Skip to main content

Full text of "Radio Today (Sep 1935-Dec 1936)"

See other formats


OassX&kSAD 
Book. JKA£L_ 

i'iuGHT DEPOSIT 



Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 



AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY of CONGRESS 





-»Aft ta .: ■ KJr * J 



Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 



▲ 



» 





» 



▲ 



1 Yearly 



Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexington Ave. 



New York City 



SEP 19 1935 

General Business 

— basic trends compared with year 
ago 

— general business up 17% 

— steel production up 50% 

— electric-power output up 1 2% 

— industrial production up 20-30% 

— Stock Exchange sales up 300% 

— construction averages up 20% 

— travel to Europe highest since '29 

Radio Outlook 

— 60 to 100% production increase 
announced by leading set-makers 

— set sales up from 2,027,000, 1st 
half '34 to 2,453,000 1st half '35 

— third-quarter figures so far indicate 
1 5 to 20% increase over last year 

— industry leaders predict continuing 
sales pace this winter 

Broadcasting 

— broadcasting billings, network and 
local, for Sept. top 1934 by 20% 

— return of favorites to Fall programs 
will keep interest at high pitch 

— networks hang "standing room 
only" sign on available time; de- 
sirable hours practically sold out 

— big chains hike Sept. income $525- 
000 over last year 

Farm Market 

— farm income up average of $36,- 
000,000 a month over last year 
rising commodity prices, increased 
AAA payments, improve farm 
buying power 

— wheat, corn, oats, hogs, butter, 
eggs up 30 to 100% compared to 
year ago 

— sale of battery receivers doubles 

— new windmill generator expected 
to open wider farm radio market 



Tube Situation 

— metal-type shortage still continues 

— factory production vigorously 
pushed 

— higher "metal" costs attacked 

— future advantages for "metal" 
claimed 

— 12% of new receivers, metal-tube 
exclusively 

— tube types increased, eventually 
simplified 

— new construction possibilities 



The War Against Radio 

— newspaper publishers blast broad- 
casting 

— propaganda aims to discredit radio 
advertising (page 10) 

— publication of distorted facts gives 
public wrong impression 

— attack involves everybody in radio 

— does it mean war? 

— open break may mean expansion of 
news broadcasts 

— will facsimile prove radio's weapon 
for counter-attack? (page 22) 



Radio's four basic indexes 
all point up! 



Year Sept. 
Ago 1935 



Year This 
Ago Month 



Last This 
Month Month 



Year This 
Ago Month 



GENERAL 
BUSINESS 



SALES OF 
RADIO SETS 



MONTHLY BROADCASTING 

VOLUME • BILLINGS 



• SEPTEMBE 



935 



-^s 



On the Air, 
as in the Air 




^hmvmanskip 




holds the crowds! 

Showmanship of the kind that sus- 
tains and increases your market for 
finest radio receivers 



Showmanship wins and holds the crowds — 
in the breathless "delayed opening" para- 
chute drop, or the carefully-built radio 
program. Showmanship delivers the enter- 
tainment the whole world wants — thrills, 
laughter, tears, romance. Without these, 
there is no entertainment, no audience — 
and no receiver sales! 

Showmanship has made the programs on 
NBC Networks the outstanding entertain- 
ment of radio since 1926. Day in and day out, 
sponsored and sustaining programs on NBC 
attract the greatest air audience in the world. 

Your prospects are in this audience. They 
find radio worthwhile because of the fine 
programs they hear. NBC showmanship 
therefore makes a priceless contribution to 
your business. 

For maximum sales effectiveness, feature 
not only the fine instruments you have for 
sale, but also the outstanding NBC programs. 
They are one of your biggest sales assets, 
providing the incentive to own better re- 
ceivers for the reception of programs that 
were never so appealing to the public as 
they are today ! 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO., Inc. 

A Radio Corporation of America Subsidiary 

NEW YORK . CHICAGO . WASHINGTON ■ SAN FRANCISCO 




'Emerson 



SMf-2> 



High Fidelity — .Model 105 — $129.95 

11 -tube console — continuous wave - 

range — 16 to 555 meters — with METAL 

tubes — 12-inch Dynamic Speaker — 15 

watts output. 




Emerson Model 102 — $S9.95 

S-tube AC — continuous wave-rangre — 16 
to 555 meters — with METAL, tubes — 10- 
inch Dynamic Speaker — 7 watts output. 




Emerson Model 101 (AC* — $59.95 
Emerson Model 101-U (AC-DC) — $69.95 

3-bfind. 6-tube — with METAL tubes — 

3 watts output — 10 - inch Dynamic 

Speaker. 




"Re-Creates 

the Artist 

in Your 

Home" 



1 Q GREAT 
1.J7 MODELS— 
Table types, Consoles, Bat- 
tery and Auto Sets — $14.95 
to $129.95. METAL TUBES 
— new, exclusive features — 
all backed by powerful pro- 
motion. 

Distributors — Dealers — send 
for complete Catalog and de- 
tails of the livest merchan- 
dising proposition in the in- 
dustry. 



Radio 





"Duo-Tone" Model 107 — $44.95 

3-band. 6-tube AC-DC — with METAL 

tubes — Identical Grille front and back — 

dust-proof Dynamic Speaker. 



'•Duo-Tone" Model 100 — $U4.95 

2-band. 6-tube AC-DC — with METAL 

tubes — Identical Grille front and back — 

dust-proof Dynamic Speaker. 




Model 110 — Compact — $29.95 

2-band. 5-tube AC-DC — Aeroplane Dial 

— dust-proof Dynamic Speaker — Walnut 

Cabinet 




Model 10S — Compact — $24.95 

2-band. 5-tube AC-DC — Aeroplane Dial 

— dust-proof Dynamic Speaker — Bake- 

lite Cabinet. 



Model 109 — Compact — $14.95 

AC - DC Superheterodyne — illuminated 
Aeroplane Dial — Bakelite Cabinet. 



VOTE: All Prices Slightly Higher in West and Sonth. See Complete Emerson Line 
at .National Electrical <fe Radio Exposition, Grand Central Palace, September 18-28. 



EMERSON RADIO AND PHONOGRAPH CORP., Ill Eighth Ave., NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Atm5%ter I£emt 



. NE WTONB r USMP ; . :f "-Xq 
A up front on the selling i ^ alf and 

in the magazines about th for 19 36 

in metal-tube Atwater Kent » > ^ ^ mbes 

youknowwhatasell ngPOi ^ ^ Awater 

have already become Look laborat0 ry engi- 

Kent has done with then. ^. fc 

neers have specially desig w tms tbe 

7 ,*,• Ken/, Preside"' 
4. Atwatei Kent, r .._ 

ara.N THE ABATER KENT RAD.O HOUR 
AGMNT GOESONTHEAIRV epresented 

•„ hear the brilliant guest arust ^ ^ , 
Millions will hear tn Radi0 H 0urs 

°° the rrSgttS September 19* ove Color ^ 
at 8:30 p- »•' Degl , These millions will neii 
coast-to-coast network T^. roo/b ReC When 

"* — ' *? t f o bu y rt« will mean *»££^36 
they . *%£££* the radio they want 
S-tube Atwater Kent. 




-,'. 










COMPARE this metal tube chassis with 
any other make at any price. See how 
Atwater Kent famous precision work- 
manship has adopted the new metal 
tubes to create a new tone realism. 



MODEL 856. A 6-tube compact 
with METAL tubes, 3-range tun- 
ing. 7 tuned circuits. 3-gang con- 
densers. Accurate 2-speed tuning, 
$56.60. 





MODEL 337. Standard and 
short-wave reception. 7 
METAL tubes, 3-range tuning, 
7 tuned circuits. 3-gang conden- 
ser. 2-speed tuning. $64-50. 



MODEL 184. A 4-tube com- 
pact. 4 tuned circuits, tone con- 
trol. Illuminated dial. Vernier 
tuning. Rich tone quality. 
$27.50. 
— — — — 



RADIO HOUR 



Radio Today 




September, 1935 



RAYTHEON 



TRADE MARK 



presents 





DO 



and 



^ 



i 



f 

r 




MODERN RADIO SERVICE 
AND MERCHANDISING 



Raytheon's 33 New Tube Deals 

offer a wide range of service equipment, 
designed to meet 1935-36 conditions 
including the special requirements of 
metal tubes and octal sockets. 

"TUBE TALKS" Modern Radio Serv- 
ice and Merchandising (including tube 
complements). This 48-page book is hot- 
off-the-press, full of sales ideas, service 
tips and constructive suggestions, which 
have been tried out and proved in actual 
practice. Subjects cover not only radio 
tubes but also include sound methods 
applicable to all radio products. 

Finally, 30 of the 48 pages are devoted 
to a tube complement section which lists 
the types and numbers of tubes required 
by various model receivers of 25 well- 
known radio manufacturers. This data 
covers over 2,000 models. This informa- 
tion should be available for reference, 
in all dealers' sales and service departments and by all independent service men. 

This is the start of a service reference library. The binding, designed especially 
for this book, permits the addition of supplementary pages which we will supply 
periodically . . . We believe this book is unique and is worth many times the price 
placed upon it. First edition is limited Mailed prepaid for 50c 

Ask your Jobber for complete details of Raytheon's New Tube Deals or write to 

RAYTHEON PRODUCTION CORPORATION 

Genera/ Safes Office: Dept.T9, 30 East 42nd Street, New York 



I 



mj= 



RAYTHEON PRD0UCTIOH CORPORATISM 



Radio Today, published monthly by Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexington Avenue, New York City. 
Subscriptions Yearly, $1 in U. S. ; $2 in Canada and fo;eign countries. Contents copyrighted. 



Radio Today 



to date 




LOOK FOR THE RADIO 

WITH 

THE BIG BLACK DIAL 



August 20 
42,314 Consumers 
have asked 
the factory* for 
particulars of the 

1936 




-* LONG-DISTANCE «- 



RADIO 



*In response to our 
opening advertising 



INVESTIGATE 



ZENITH RADIO CORPORATION 

3620 IRON STREET, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Visit the Zenith Exhibit, Booth No. 53, Main Floor, National Electrical and Radio 
Exposition, Grand Central Palace, New York City 



September, 1935 



...and 5>saaiL@@'i 

MARGIN OF LEADERSHIP 
CONTINUES TO GROW! 

Philco, in 1935, had the biggest Spring 
in its history. Philco, in 1935, had the biggest Summer in its history. Philco 
enters this Fall with more orders on its books than ever before.— Philco today 
is employing 40% more people than in its previous record year of 1934. 



fjl "Be sure you're right — then go 
ahead" is as good a motto today as 
when old Ben Franklin first set it in 
type. 

fj Philco has made that motto its 
own. With one important change! 
Philco's version reads "Be sure you're 
right— then full speed ahead!" 

C]J Following that policy has meant 
top speed at all times in the develop- 
ment of worth-while scientific and 
engineering ideas. 

€J But a score of times in the past ten 
years Philco's adherence to another 
basic principle— " Proven worth is 
preferable to risky experiment "— has 
saved Philco dealers from embar- 
rassing moments with dissatisfied 
customers. 



€J Philco dealers know they can put 
full trust in the decisions of the Philco 
research laboratories . . . the largest 
in the world devoted exclusively to 
radio engineering. That faith in Philco 
was a potent factor in making Philco 
the leader in the industry in 1930 . . . 
and keeping Philco first ever since! 



fl 



Philco is first 

• in engineering 

• in worth-while features 

• in fine tone 

• in foreign reception 

• in cabinet design 

• in complete selection 

• in price range 

• in value 

• in national advertising 

• in merchandising assistance 

• in public demand 

• in sales 

• in DEALER PROFIT 



PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 

Philadelphia • New York • Chicago • San Francisco • Toronto • London, England 



Radio Today 



©C1B 



275044 



Staff— 

Dakrell Bartee 
Franklin S. Irby 
Randall R. Irwin 
G. H. Mayorga 
M. H. Newton 
J. E. Osmun 
John F. Rider 
B. Spinetta 
V. K. Ulrich 



Lee Robinson 

Sales Manager 



RADIO 
TODAY 



Orestes H. Calhw ell 
Editor 

M. Clements 
Publisher 

■180 Lexington Ave. 
New York City 
Tel. PLaza 3t-13-;0 y 

Vol. I, No. 1 



Basic indexes up 17% 

* The September busi- 
ness indicator points upward 17%, 
compared with a year ago, judging by 
substantial increases in all the com- 
ponents which make up the basic 
business index. 

Conspicuous advances in key pro- 
duction figures for the month moved 
the general index upward to brightest 
levels since the leap which followed 
the temporary tonic of NRA two 
years ago. With estimated normal at 
100, the index now stands at about 
88 — several points over last month, 
and nearly 13 points above a year ago. 

Steel and construction soar 

* Iron and steel produc- 
tion rose 50% above figure for same 
period last year; meanwhile construc- 
tion contracts show increased building- 
activity to the tune of some 20%. 

Money in circulation is up 4% over 
last year. Small in percentage, it 
means 215,000,000 in dollars, and that 
will buy a lot of 89-cent radio tubes ! 

Interesting luxury note is that num- 
ber of Americans travelling to Europe 
is now at highest peak since '29. This 
shows tendency to spend, a healthy 
sign for radio — long considered a 
necessity item, though still in the 
semi-luxury group for a good many 
families. 

Radio folloivs basic trends 

* Keeping pace with 
basic conditions, radio-set sales and 
broadcast advertising also show satis- 
fying increases. 

Preliminary figures so far for cur- 
rent quarter indicate 15 to 20% over 
last year for last half of 1935. Some 
manufacturers (they themselves 
state) have even had the temerity to 
schedule 60 to 100% production in- 
creases this Fall. 

Set makers report sales for first 
half '35 around 2,453,382 units, com- 



pared with 2,027,032 same period last 
year, with average price considerably 
higher. This ups 1935 half some 
425,000 units, or about 21%. 

Broadcast billings 
mount 20% 

* Sale of time shows 
broadcasting also following same up- 
ward swing. Broadcast billings in 
IT. S. for September will top 1934 fig- 
ures at least 20%. Total for sale of 
time local and network will reach 
$6,166,770 this month, compared with 
$5,121,314 September, '34. NBC will 
hike September income some $223,000 
over same month last year, while 
CBS figure is reported as $299,000 
up, an increase of 43% over Septem- 
ber, '34. Billings at NBC this month 
are reported as over $2,000,000, with 
CBS expecting at least $1,000,000. 

Network figures for 12 months end- 
ing August 31st are impressive. NBC 
reports total time sales $30,887,415 ; 
CBS, $16,843,144, total increase of 
some 23% over previous 12-month 
period ('33-'34). 



I ALL BROADCASTING UP —TO SPEND 
$100,000,000 THIS SEASON . I 



$ 16.800,000 £ 20.I6O.OOO 



$30,800,000 £3S,+iO,000 



OTHER 
STATIONS 



H 



4+0,000,000 ^+5,000,000 



Metal-tube shortage 

* While the production 
of metal tubes is still behind the de- 
mand, and undoubtedly will continue 
so for some time to come, factory ex- 
ecutives feel that they are making 
good progress in catching up, so that 
by the end of the season, at least, 
metal-tube manufacture will meet all 
requirements. "Shrinkage" has been 
reduced, and air-leakage controlled, 
factory men declare. 

Some radio-set manufacturers re- 
port that they are getting all the 
metal tubes they need; others have 
substituted octal-base glass tubes, or 
standard glass tubes in sets being- 
shipped out during recent weeks for 
the 1935-36 season. 



Retailers on upgrade 

+ Retailing, after usual 
Summer lull, has again turned up, 
showing more than seasonal advance ; 
expectation in most lines is for larger 
than normal increases this Fall and 
Winter, with possibility of slightly 
more than seasonal recession next 
Spring and Summer. 

Retail sales, according to the Na- 
tional Industrial Conference Board, 
showed a tendency during the Sum- 
mer to decline more than the usual 
seasonal amount, but are still well 
above 1934. Department-store sales 
show a gain of 7.8% over last year, 
while rural sales (including mail or- 
der) are up 28.6%. 

Automobile sales form a bright 
spot in the picture, sales of passenger 
cars running consistently 25% higher 
than '34, while commercial car sales 
show an even greater increase. 

Situation in radio trade is still 
somewhat unsettled due to indecision 
caused by metal tubes. Retailers and 
wholesalers alike are waiting for pub- 
lic to indicate its own choice, with 
opinion tending toward belief that 



September, 1935 





He Proposed 'Em. 



He Disposes of 'Em. 



Here are two top figures in metal tubes today. W. C. White, GE engineer who 

developed the new tubes {left) and R. J. Cordiner, radio sales manager of 

General Electric (right) who has made merchandising history with them. 



free) time believed behind the move- 
ment. 

Similarly instigated is Eudd Bill 
(Rep. Rudd, D, New York) which 
calls for reallocation of all wave- 
lengths, with one-quarter of facilities 
reserved for non-profit organizations 
of the type mentioned above. 

Typical of the anti-radio viewpoint 
in Washington is recent blast by Com- 
missioner Payne, condemning radio 
as "battling for no rights" and "dan- 
gerous of becoming too influential 
politically;" and the Sept. 2nd com- 
plaint by Rep. Fish (R., New York) 
that KOA had "censored" his talk 
and demanding a Washington inves- 
tigation. 

With radio at mercy of selfishly in- 
terested politicians, future of broad- 
cast set-up needs jealous guarding by 
those who want to see radio expand 
and progress, rather than become 
football for political oligarchies that 
are liable to change every four years. 



curiosity will bring unusually large 
store traffic this season. 

With larger than normal number 
of prospects coming in to see what 
metal tubes are all about, most deal- 
ers lean to belief that good selling will 
result in sales of sets carried, whether 
metal or glass tubes are used. In- 
creased store traffic due to new-tube 
curiosity is seen as biggest sales ad- 
vantage this year. 

Broadcast stations 
seek to increase power 

* Forty-two million peo- 
ple living in the United States are 
still outside of the primary service 
range of any broadcasting station. 
Such listeners can get only "second- 
ary service" — occasional fortuitous 
listening when conditions are good — 
not steady, strong signals overriding 
static. Only solution is, of course, 
higher power all-round. 

Recognizing this, Federal Com- 
munication Commission now turns 
more sympathetic ear toward more 
kilowatts. Report is FCC may de- 
mand all clear-channel stations to 
go to 50 kw., at least. Commish also 
looking more favorably on 500 kw. 
applications, which it formerly re- 
garded with horror! Several of these 
aspirants to "match Crosley" are 
known to be getting quotations on 
giant transmitters — among them 
WGN, WSM, WHAS. Regional 
stations are seeking increases to 5 
kw., raising the whole power level on 
a channel without altering the inter- 
ference pattern. 



Congressional meddling 

* Are dangers of polit- 
ical control of radio, feared since 
formation of the first Radio Commis- 
sion in 1927, now becoming apparent? 
Rep. Scott (D., California) just be- 
fore Congress adjourned, introduced 
bill to set up Broadcasting Commit- 
tee to investigate radio; demands of 
political, religious and social reform 
groups for more (and incidentally 



Tragic irony 



* Ironical and pathetic 
were the circumstances under which 
the parents of Wiley Post learned of 
the death of their famous son. 

Radio flashed the tragic news of the 
crash to countless millions the nation 
over; but sympathetic friends, calling 
on the senior Posts, were the first to 
bring them the news. Their set was 
out of order; and no newspapers 
reached the remote village for hours. 




Life is a song — 
but only as long as the good old volume curve points upward. Happy harmony 
here is being supplied by Judson Sayre (center) newly appointed assistant to 
RCA-Victor's president — with words and music by Ray Rosen, Philly dis- 
tributor (left) and E. T. Cunningham, RCA-Victor chief. 



8 



Radio Today 



Radio in next election 

* The Republican 
National Committee started some- 
thing when it chose a radio director 
in the person of Thomas G. Sabin, 
to organize political broadcasts for 
the presidential campaign, 1936. 

Plans at the studios for the party 
ballyhoo are not complete, although 
indications are that when the broad- 
casts get under way, both the Re- 
publicans and Democrats will pre- 
sent regular programs on announced 
times and stations through the pe- 
riod, rather than spotting the mate- 
rial at random. Educational pro- 
grams and band music, besides the 
regular verbal attack, have been 
suggested. 

High-poiver abroad — Cohan 

* High-power broadcast- 
ing is more common-place in Europe 
than in the United States, reports 
Edward K. Cohan, technical director 
of the Columbia Broadcasting Sys- 
tem, who has just returned from a 
summer inspection tour of a dozen 
countries over there. Besides the 
500 kw. Moscow transmitter, 100 kw. 
stations are plentiful. Droitwich 
has 150 kw. ; Luxembourg 250 kw. ; 
Vienna 120 kw. ; Rome 100 kw. 

Russia now has thirty-three broad- 
casting stations of all sizes. Much 
of the time these are operated as a 
network, with wire or radio links 
between Moscow-central and the out- 
lying transmitters. Short-wave con- 
nections have been used; in some 
cases the local outlet merely picks 
up and rebroadcasts the 500 kw. 
broadcast signal from Moscow. 

Mr. Cohan was greatly impressed 
with the engineering refinements of 
broadcasting operations in England. 
The British Broadcasting Company 
has 2,000 employes, more than 40 per 
cent of whom are engineers. 

Average price, $76; 7 tubes 

* A survey of Radio 
Today's listing of home receivers on 
following pages of this issue brings 
some interesting figures to light. The 
average price of receivers is $76. The 
radios included range from $9.95 in 
price for a table compact to $985 for 
a 16-tube deluxe console. 

About 12 per cent of the models are 
equipped exclusively with metal tubes 
and 19 per cent are supplied with a 
combination of metal tubes and glass 
tubes. Approximately 65 per cent 
employ the old-type glass tubes while 
the balance of 4 per cent represents 
the use of metal-glass tubes. Some- 
what less than seven tubes is the av- 
erage number found in the new model 




What chance has a parts manufacturer between two set makers? George Scoville 

(left) vice-president, Stromberg Carlson, and Jim Skinner (right) president, 

Philco, look ready to take the victim over the hurdles. Victim (center) is 

Fred Williams, general manager. International Resistance. 



radios. A comparison of four out- 
standing manufacturers shows that 
the average number of tubes employed 
in their receivers is practically the 
same. 




Leo J. Fitzpatrick, general manager 
of WJR, Detroit, is the new prexy of 
National Association of Broadcasters. 
Known as a guy who "stands no non- 
sense," he is expected to make NAB's 
new year a lively one. 



The all-wave and skip-band trend 
is being adhered to again this year, 
more than 85 per cent of the receivers 
having coverage on two or more 
bands. A few of the higher-priced 
models provide a band in the vicinity 
of 150 to 400 kilocycles, the percent- 
age being slightly more than fifteen. 

International plot 

* European ether is by 
no means sacred to the American 
manufacturers of radios, and since 
last June the RMA has been consid- 
ering a serious invasion. The Export 
Committee of the Association, guided 
so far by Arthur T. Murray, Spring- 
field, Mass., finds itself all mixed up 
amid the lofty and slow-moving 
negotiations by the State Depart- 
ment, involving new reciprocal trade 
agreements with continental neigh- 
bors, especially France. 

Farewell to EAT 

* EAT, radio station at 
Addis Ababa, will probably be much 
in the news before this Ethiopian 
business is over. It is Emperor Haile 
Selassie's link with the outside world, 
and ordinarily works with London. 
Probably the first effort of the attack- 
ing forces will be to bomb EAT and 
blow it to bits, thus shutting off com- 
munication with Europe. And EAT 
is a brand-new job, too — in opera- 
tion hardly a year! 



September, 1935 



THE WAR AGAINST RADIO 

Newspaper attacks threaten livelihood of entire radio industry 



• AFTER seething behind the 
scenes for many months, the attack 
of the organized newspapers on radio 
broadcasting has finally been brought 
out in the open. In the headlines of 
newspapers all over the country, 
bitter charges are hurled against 
radio. 

Does this mean war? Does this 
mean a long and bitter fight between 
two of America's great industries? 
Does it mean that America's two 
greatest mediums of public service 
and communication will lock horns 
in a battle royal, from which one or 
the. other must emerge dominated 
and suppressed? 

Does it mean prolonged hostilities 
between the 2,000 daily newspapers in 
the United States, and the 600 broad- 
casting stations ? 

Those are the questions everybody 
in the newspaper and radio worlds 
is asking today, after the publication 
of the latest blast against radio broad- 
casting by the American Newspaper 
Publishers Association, the organiza- 
tion that claims the membership of 
practically every large newspaper 
publisher. 

While the newspapers' attack is 
aimed primarily at broadcasters, to 
discredit radio as an advertising me- 
dium, its eventual and insidious 
effects must be felt by everybody in 
radio — manufacturers, distributors, 
dealers and service men alike. 

Stab in the heart 

For broadcasting is the very life- 
blood of the whole radio business. 
Broadcasting sells radio sets. Broad- 
casting is the foundation of the busi- 
ness of every radio set-maker, jobber, 
retailer and repairman. 

If newspapers' attempt to discredit 
and weaken broadcasting succeeds, 
the direct effects will be felt all the 
way down the line. In every home of 
every man in radio. 

Destroy the present high standards 
and necessary incomes of broadcasters 
— and radio factories will be empty, 
jobbers might as well call in their 
salesmen, dealers close up their stores, 
and radio service men get themselves 
jobs as office-boys with their local 
newspapers. "Grass will grow in the 
streets of our industry" — perhaps. 

Looked at from any angle — that 
of the public or that of the radio 



industry — this well-organized at- 
tempt to discredit broadcasting is 
serious. For it is nothing short of a 
widespread effort to have the finest 
programs now on the air withdrawn 
— the public deprived of its most 
popular and economical form of en- 
tertainment — chief contact with the 
outside worid taken away from mil- 
lions of city and rural homes. 

Press conflict old 

Conflict of interests between press 
and radio is nothing new. Tears 
ago, far-sighted broadcasters saw the 
opportunity for radio to bring the 
people of America a fast-moving news 
service that would inform them of 
important news events all over the 
world, almost as soon as these hap- 
pened; no need for waiting several 
hours for newspapers to be published 
and bought in the streets. 

In fact, the birth of broadcasting 
itself, as every radio man remembers, 
actually occurred through a news 
broadcast — the election returns from 
KDKA at Pittsburgh in 1920. 

For more than ten years — while 
newspapers saw circulation-building 
values in radio for themselves — 
radio and press co-operated in the 
public interest. Newspapers, some- 
what unwillingly, gave publicity to 
radio program listings and even fur- 
nished news to broadcasting stations. 

But a few years ago, a sharp change 
in the attitude of newspapers toward 
radio began to be apparent. News- 
papers saw their advertising revenues 
decreasing rapidly, while radio adver- 
tising made great strides forward as 
a new form of reaching the public 
with a sales message. Newspapers 
began to fear this new force, both as 
a news service .to the public and as 
an advertising medium for large na- 
tional advertisers. One big press as- 
sociation is reported to have a stand- 
ing order to its staff that even the 
word "radio" must not go out in its 
dispatches. 



So newspaper publishers began 
definitely to turn against radio. 
Sniping began as early as 1930 and 
before, when some newspapers dis- 
continued publication of radio pro- 
grams. But even that unpopular 
move made dramatically apparent the 
strong hold that radio had obtained 
on public opinion. People turned 
from those program-less newspapers 
to the wiser newspapers which did 
carry the program listings. Radio 
had won its first press skirmish by 
sheer force of public interest. 

Flash news 

Hostile attitude of the press by 
now was such that broadcasters, feel- 
ing the growing antagonism of the 
newspapers, made preparations to set 
up their own news-gathering facili- 
ties. The Columbia Broadcasting 
System, in 1933, actually started and 
operated a widespread news service 
for the benefit of its listeners. The 
National Broadcasting Company 
made similar plans and had its or- 
ganization ready to start full blast 
when and if the newspapers refused 
further co-operation. 

But a quick move on the part of 
the newspaper interests prevented full 
operation of such plans. Press asso- 
ciations and newspapers moved 
swiftly to force broadcasters out of 
the news service field. Under impli- 
cations of a threatened newspaper 
campaign to destroy radio broadcast- 
ing, and in order to prevent open 
warfare between the press and radio, 
the broadcasters agreed to formation 
of the Press-Radio Bureau early in 
1934. It was an agreement signed 
literally with a gun pointed at the 
Heads of the broadcasters. It was an 
agreement which irked the radio men 
who assented to it, and brought down 
on their heads bitter condemnation 
from the whole radio industry when 
the unsatisfactory results to radio 
listeners were revealed. 



Nets up, 416% N ^S2Slr 

Advertising 

1928 $230,000,000 

1929 260,000,000 

1930 230,000,000 

1931 205,000,000 

1932 160,000,000 

1933 145,000,000 

1934 163,000,000 



Tear to Tear 


Radio 


Tear to Tear 


Ratio 


Network 


Ratio 


(1928 = 100) 


Advertising 


(1928=100) 


100 


$10,252,497 


100 


113 


18,729,571 


182 


100 


26,815,746 


261 


89 


35.791.S99 


348 


70 


39,106.776 


381 


63 


31,516,298 


307 


71 


42,659,461 


416 



10 



Radio Today 



By the terms of this abortive com- 
pact, leading and powerful press assp- 
ciations agreed to supply incomplete 
news bulletins to radio stations, to a 
limited and restricted extent. In re- 
turn for this abbreviated "service" 
(for which the stations paid) the 
broadcasters agreed to discontinue all 
plans for perfecting their own news- 
gathering facilities. 

The Press-Radio Bureau service 
has, of course, never been altogether 
satisfactory to the radio industry nor 
to the public. Its news is limited to 
a few restricted five-minute periods 
a day; bulletins are skimpy and un- 
satisfying; listeners are referred to 
local newspapers for full details, and 
the news cannot be broadcast until 
it has been published elsewhere. 



PROPAGANDA! 



National Radiol 
Advertising OU! 
70PX.inl934\ 



Sk 



Jn Radio 'Ad, 



° f the S.WI 



D 



Radio scoops press 

Also, the ill-starred Press-Radio 
Bureau, depending upon the press 
services for its news flashed to co- 
operating broadcasting stations, has 
made several bad boners for which 
radio got the blame. One after an- 
other, in a series of some of the big- 
gest news events of the year, the press 
services got their first tips dead wrong, 
and sent out to broadcasting stations 
erroneous news flashes, which later 
had to be corrected. 
Look at the record : 
— Press associations told broad- 
casting stations the Macon hit a 
mountain; it fell in the ocean. 
— Press associations said Haupt- 
mann got life imprisonment ; he 
was condemned to die. 
— Press associations got the famous 
Gold Clause decision of the Su- 
preme Court completely cock- 
eyed right from the start; more 
apologies and more corrections. 
Meanwhile, new special radio news 
services for broadcasting stations 
have come into the picture — like 
Transradio — getting things right, 
getting them fast. 

— got the Macon story right; got 
the Hauptmann story right; got 
the Gold Clause story right. 
— first with confirmation of rumors 
of the deaths of Will Rogers and 
Wiley Post. 
— first by half an hour with news 
of the death of Queen Astrid of 
the Belgians. 
Radio cannot afford to be wrong; 
once the news is broadcast, it cannot 
be called back; newspapers have time 
to stop the presses, destroy the papers ; 
radio must stand or fall on its own 
speed and accuracy. 

Radio can not only get the news 
fast and right, but it can put the 
news into the homes of America min- 



<pt 



RA^O 



\ s ot 



utes and hours before that same news 
can be read in the newspapers. 

What the outcome of an open break 
between radio and newspapers will be, 
only time will tell. Meanwhile, the 
American Newspaper Publishers' As- 
sociation, through its latest pamphlet, 
"Yardsticks on the Air," has made a 
definite attempt to discredit radio, 
both in the eyes of the public and in 
the opinions of national advertisers 
whose fine programs have made radio 
broadcasting the popular institution 
it is today. 



MANY ADVERTISERS 
QUIT USING RADIO 

SurvtyShows70.6% olThost on 

Air From 1 929 Throagh 1933 

Had Dropped Oat in 1934. 



Full of distorted and misleading 
"information" this "analysis" of radio 
issued by the newspapers is laugh- 
ingly akin to Italy's claims against 
Ethiopia. Only one part of the story 
is told and that part often inaccurate. 

Theme song of the statistician who 
authored this specimen is that 70 per 
cent of the advertisers who used radio 
in 1928 had dropped out by 1934. 
That's true, as far as it goes. 

What the newspapers did NOT 

(Please turn to page 30) 



BUT HERE ARE THE FACTS! 




"'°NALtl^ KV 



Broadcast advertising has mounted while newspaper and magazine 
d-eclined (zero percentage equals 1928-1932 average) 



» ,NO 



advertising 



September, 1935 



11 



RECEIVERS TODAY 



* SEPTEMBER plunges radio 
into the most interesting season of 
radio's most interesting year — the 
season which brings disclosure of 
the new models to the trade and pub- 
lic. During the past nine months, 
engineering and production depart- 
ments have been laboring, literally 
night and day in many cases, to pre- 
pare the designs and the products 
which are now appearing for the 
1935-36 season. We know that prog- 
ress in the radio art has been, and 
still is, rapid, and it is interesting 
to review the advances which form 
the features of the present season. 

Metal tube complications 

As a plan of review, the develop- 
ments of 1935-36 may be divided into 
those pertaining to circuits, and those 
more wholly mechanical. Each of 
these groups may be separated into 
items which are universal, or nearly 
so, throughout the industry, and 
those which are individual to one 
manufacturer, or at most a few 
companies. 

Considering first the circuit de- 
velopments of universal sort, the 
outstanding item of the year is of 
course the metal tube. Here the 
situation is made complicated by 
the use of more than one type of 
metal tube. For certain intermediate 
types partly glass and partly metal 
have been introduced as well as the 



all-metal type. These additional 
types utilize previous structural 
methods to a considerable extent, and 
are therefore more readily produced 
this year. They are intended to be 
interchangeable with the new all- 
metal type of tube and thereby to 
assist in meeting the full tube re- 
quirements of the industry, until all- 
metal tube production is able to 
catch up. The all-metal tube is a 
revolutionary change in tube con- 
struction, and its advocates believe 
it will bring about, within a very 
few years, marked improvements in 
performance and reliability of tubes 
and receivers. Most of the receiver 
manufacturers have equipped at 
least several models with metal tubes 
this year, and there is little doubt 
that future receiver designs will 
utilize metal tubes extensively. The 
year 1935 will be remembered as the 
year of the metal tube introduction. 

More tubes — better sets 

It appears that a trend to more 
tubes in the medium and higher 
priced receivers is definitely estab- 
lished. The number of receivers 
using from ten to twenty-five tubes 
is considerably larger than last year. 
The additional tubes are used for 
better and more refined performance, 
such as less distortion, more output, 
better selectivity without effect upon 
fidelity, better volume control, better 
tuning indicators. 




Midnight-blue mirror-glass Sparton console, chromium-steel trim, styled by 
Walter Teague, famous designer. Contrast with ip2j model 



Also, it appears -that there is a 
trend to somewhat greater emphasis 
upon the better receivers. It seems 
to be more recognized that both per- 
formance and reliability can not be 
built into the complex and critically 
adjusted instrument which is the 
modern broadcast receiver, for sale 
at $13.98. Prices range from twenty 
to six hundred dollars, with "full per- 
formance" models, that is, models 
having features such as automatic 
volume control, bass augmentation, 
etc., ranging from about forty dollars 
up. 

"Higher fidelity" 

High fidelity has received atten- 
tion and all manufacturers have im- 
proved tone quality in their better 
models with increased high frequency 
response and "cleaner" bass. A vital 
part of high-fidelity circuits is the 
"band-width control," and there has 
been considerable improvement in 
both constructional and performance 
aspects of this feature. Methods de- 
pending upon variation of inductive 
coupling between intermediate-fre- 
quency tuned circuits are standard 
practice. 

Many manufacturers have intro- 
duced this year another wave band, 
that below 550 kc, for reception of 
weather reports sent out regularly by 
airways stations. 

The use of additional wave-bands, 
or short waves, giving foreign broad- 
cast, amateur and police call recep- 
tion, should perhaps not be classed 
as a 1935 feature, as it became stand- 
ard practice last year. The 1935 
models conclusively show, however, 
that "short waves" have become an 
accepted and expected feature of 
broadcast receivers, and are here to 
stay. 

"Hoiv's your antenna?" 

The importance of efficient anten- 
nas is now widely recognized, and all 
manufacturers are making recommen- 
dation for, and many specific provi- 
sion for, suitable antennas for broad- 
cast receivers, especially for all-wave 
use. The importance of having good 
antenna installations can not be em- 
phasized too strongly. They are in- 
dispensable to satisfactory foreign 
short-wave reception, and give worth- 
while improvement even in domestic 
broadcast reception. 

Accent on bass 

In the sets themselves, a number 
of circuit developments are found to 
be widely utilized this year. Bass 
augmentation (whereby amplification 



12 



Radio Today 



of the bass register relative to the 
treble is increased, on low volume 
adjustments) is practically universal, 
and has been refined in method and 
performance. 

Chassis layouts better 

In the department of mechanical 
features of the year, we find no 
radical innovations in cabinets, minor 
variations in design and decoration 
forming the differences from last 
year. But there is considerable im- 
provement in details of chassis struc- 
ture. It is noteworthy that parts 
such as trimmer condensers, electro- 
lytic condensers, i-f transformers, 
upon whose quality continued satis- 
factory service depends, have been 
refined and improved in the new 
sets. Several manufacturers have 
introduced special features of con- 
struction aimed at simplifying the 
layout and wiring of the chassis, 
which are effective and generally ex- 
cellent. Keceivers have increased 
greatly in circuit complexity and 
number of parts during the past few 
years, and mechanical design has not 
kept pace in accommodating the 
added parts efficiently and reliably. 
It was often said of last year's sets 
that they resembled birds' nests in 
under-chassis appearance. This year 
apparently marks the beginning of 
efforts to improve in this respect of 
workmanlike layout. At least two 
manufacturers have eliminated scores 
of short wires and soldered connec- 
tions by designing parts with termi- 
nals which fasten together directly. 
Improvements in this direction pro- 
duce more efficient manufacture and 
greater reliability in service. 

New dials 

A number of special features have 
appeared. One manufacturer has a 
new form of dial which is particu- 
larly beautiful in appearance, espe- 
cially when the set is turned on, and 
effective in use. Another type of 
dial has a scale which is straight and 
marked like a ruler, and the pointer 
travels horizontally back and forth. 
The graduations are printed on a 
cylindrical form which rotates 
through an angle as the wave band 
is changed. Since only one scale is 
exposed at a time, tuning is made 
exceptionally easy. 

Another has a new tuning indi- 
cator tube of the cathode-ray type, 
instead of the previously used tun- 
ing meter or shadow meter. When 
the receiver is in operation the ex- 
posed surface of the tube is lumin- 



ous with a green light. A dark sec- 
tor extending downward from the 
center narrows as the station is tuned 
in, and when it is narrowest, the re- 
ceiver is perfectly tuned for best re- 
production. The indicator thus re- 
sembles an eye. 



"Volume range expander' 

One manufacturer has announced 
a circuit innovation of considerable 
importance. This is the "volume 
range expander." Broadcast station 
operation and phonograph recording 



require some compression of volume 
range, that is, reducing loud sounds 
and increasing weak ones in order 
to overcome certain practical difficul- 
ties of transmission and recording. 
The original relative values of loud- 
ness can be restored at the receiver 
by circuits which make loud sounds 
louder and weak sounds weaker. 
Such a circuit is the "volume range 
expander"' placed on the market for 
the first time this year. It is avail- 
able in high priced instruments only, 
but should have influence in raising 
the standards and ideals of high 
quality sound reproduction. 



TUBES TODAY 



Metal-tube production 
behind 

* Delays in production, 
and higher initial costs of the new 
metal tubes, are two issues around 
which rages the present internal con- 
troversy in the tube field. 

Revolutionary manufacturing proc- 
esses were required for the new metal 
tubes; this has made refinements in 
factory methods difficult to plan at 
outset. With terrific pressure on the 
plant, the resulting "brute force" 
methods have meant high unit pro- 



duction costs, factory men admit. 
("More than a dollar a tube" runs one 
rumor.) 

Demand for the metal tubes still 
exceeds the supply and will continue 
so probably the rest of the season. 
By next season, however, the slack 
should be caught up. 

Shrinkage has been high on the 
metal tubes, some claims being made 
that 50 to 75 per cent of the tubes 
produced had to be discarded. There 
were many new fundamental problems 
faced in going to metal envelopes, 
but these are now being licked, fac- 























ito 
























130 


















\C.KJ 


















no 
















UJ 

o 


|(JU 








Cons 

s 


oles 






0. 


- <~jO 








J 










OO 

- 70 


Totrc 


il ^ 












UJ 

o 

<< 


Busir 


11 -** 
less 












UJ 


' 60 
















\ 


oO 


















tO 


Table Models -* >>v » 












" 30 


















20 






Coir 


ipacrs- 


S 








\o 


1929 


1?30 


19^1 


1?32 


1933 


1W 


1935 



Average price of all types of sets on the upgrade 



September, 1935 



13 




Television is becom- 
ing a big-scale gov- 
ernmental enterprise 
in England. Here's a 
glimpse into the 
Baird studio in 
London. 



At "Radiolympia," 
the London radio 
show, this leather- 
ette-covered kitchen 
receiver was featured. 



RADIO TODAY-IN PICTURES 



Television, transceivers, crime detection, 
point future uses of radio principles 



"Transceivers" which both send 
and receive 25 miles or more, may 
soon be a new general retail 
item for radio dealers. 




Right — Radiations 
from this "frisher" 
detect the presence of any 
concealed weapon. 




14 



Radio Today 



tory executives feel. Air leakage was 
one of the difficulties experienced in 
the early stages of metal-tube produc- 
tion. Such leakage troubles are now 
in hand, and are safeguarded against 
for customers' protection by holding 
back the tubes and re-testing them, 
thus giving a double-check on factory 
tests, before the tubes are shipped. 

Meanwhile, some receiver manu- 
facturers, unable to get their require- 
ments of the metal tubes, are ship- 
ping sets with mixed tube comple- 
ments, filling in with both standard 
glass tubes and glass tubes with the 
new octal base. 

Glass vs. metal-tube costs 

* Against the metal tube 
is brought the complaint that it has 
unnecessarily increased the number 
of tube types required for the dealer's 
stock; also that the present higher 
prices of the metal tubes are raising 
the prices of radio sets to the public. 
Metal tubes are being furnished to 
set makers at prices nearly twice the 
cost of the familiar glass tube, and 
this has opened an opportunity for 
glass tubes with octal bases, which 
can be supplied at substantially lower 
prices. Similar differentials exist in 
the retail list prices of the various 
tubes offered for replacement. For 
example, the table shows the prices 
of glass, metal, and metal-glass equiv- 
alents. 

Tube Price to Retail 

No. Set Mfr. List Price 

6A7 glass 38 cents $1.35 

6A8 metal 70 cents 1.70 

6A8g octal-glass ... 41 cents 1.70 

0-42 glass 32 cents 1.10 

6-P6 metal 60 cents 1.75 

6-F6g octal-glass ... 35 cents 1.40 

On an average receiver, it is 
claimed that the difference in cost of 
metal as against glass tubes may add 
$2.50 factory cost to the set, and that 
this item when carried to the retail 
purchaser at a multiplier of four, 
means an increase in retail cost of 
about $10 per set. 

Development expense — 
initial prices 

* Metal - tube advocates 
point out that despite staggering 
amounts of money spent on metal- 
tube development, some of the new 
metal-tube types are priced actually 
lower than were the corresponding 
glass tubes when originally intro- 
duced. 

Thus the 6A7 glass tube above 
cited first appeared at $2.20 list, in 
comparison with the initial metal 
price of $2 list. 

Similarly the 42 glass tube was 
originally priced at $2, in comparison 



with the initial price of the corre- 
sponding 6F6 metal at $1.75. 



More- 



-or 



less- 



-types 

* What will be the effect 
of the metal-tube program on retail 
tube stocks? In pre-metal days, the 
number of tubes needed was about 
150 to meet all requirements. The 
metal line has added more. Since 
many a dealer sells only about 350 
tubes a year, the necessity of carry- 
ing additional items puts a burden 
on the smaller merchant, driving tube 
business into hands of chain stores. 

On the other hand, behind the 
metal-tube program is the purpose to 
handle all future tube requirements 
with a small number of types, so that 
dealers' stocks will eventually be 
much simplified, say those pushing 
metal program. 



Redesign — 
neiv construction 

* Xew possibilities for 
tube construction are unfolding as 
the metal-tube plan develops, say en- 
gineers on the job. At present, all 
hands agree, any advantage in per- 
formance comes from the extra shield- 
ing which metal construction pro- 
vides, and reduction in microphonics. 

Present internal construction fol- 
lows closely old glass practice, but 
future models will be able to utilize 
metal envelope for radical redesign. 

Preliminary laboratory experiments 
are being made with a "metal-spray" 
sealing process to replace electrical 
welding of the outer envelope. By 
first heating the parts, and then flow- 
ing on metal from a spray-gun, the 
inventor thinks he has a cheaper sub- 
stitute for electric welding. 



AUTOMOBILE-RADIO ACTIVE 



* The new policy of the 
automobile industry in bringing out 
its new models in October instead of 
at the first of the year, has brought 
new seasonal activity into the auto- 
radio field as well. The increasing- 
number of sets installed at the fac- 
tory has resulted in large initial Fall 
orders which have speeded up some 
radio-set makers' auto-radio volume 
by 100 per cent or more. 

Latest word from Detroit also in- 
dicates that this Fall's auto radios 
give better reception and are more 
pleasing in appearance. Adoption of 
the steel roof by many of the auto- 
motive manufacturers has necessi- 
tated a change in the antenna system, 
as a result certain definite improve- 
ments have been incorporated. 

By using an antenna of the plate 
or strip type under each running 
board, ignition noise is reduced; in 
addition this type antenna does not 
respond well to frequencies higher 
than the broadcast band, thereby 
eliminating much of the high-fre- 
quency interference which formerly 
forced itself past the first detector 
and made its way into the output. 

The sensitivity of the receivers has 
been increased more than enough to 
compensate for the reduced antenna 
pick-up. Some of the receivers will 
give an output of one watt with an 
input of but a single microvolt. Im- 
provements in filtering the ignition 
system and reduction of noise pick- 
up by the antenna, as well as better 



receiver design, have made it possible 
to successfully employ this higher 
sensitivity. Reception at a distance 
is increased accordingly. 

Instead of the square, sharp-cor- 
nered cabinets, the Fall models are 
housed in cases of pleasing propor- 
tions and appearance with a definite 
leaning towards streamlining. Most 
of the automobiles are so designed 
that the controls become an integral 
part of the instrument panel. 

Efforts are being made to increase 
the frequency response of the speaker 
— the most notable being the use of 
the header speaker attached to the 
ceiling above the windshield. The 
high-frequency response is consider- 
ably increased. Experiments are be- 
ing conducted using the dash and 
other parts of the car as a baffle. 

Other problems such as brake static, 
road static, tire static, antenna insula- 
tion are receiving much attention. 

Aside to FHA 

* The RMA, thinking of 
everything, has a definite feeling that 
the FHA should not stop at the 
wrong place in its financing radio 
sales. The manufacturers have, opti- 
mistically, applied for the further 
financing of receiving sets selling at 
$75 or more, which the FHA so far 
has avoided unless when the sets were 
built in. If the FHA allows refrig- 
erators, argues the RMA, why not 
the more expensive radios? 



September, 1935 



15 



THIS INTERLOCKING 
RADIO INDOSTRY 



* IF A FLY bites a horse in the 
neck, the horse is annoyed all over. 
You can't isolate the pain or the re- 
action. The horse isn't built that 
way. 

Similarly, you can't do anything 
in any part of an industry as inti- 
mate and complex as radio, without 
affecting every other part. 

Fifteen years of progress under the 
trial and error method in radio have 
shown that whatever development 
comes next, in research, broadcasting 
technique, retailing methods, or even 
just plain listening, will invariably 
affect everybody in the industry. 
From manufacturer to consumer — 
from Eddie Cantor to the service 
man around the corner — everybody 
in radio has a stake in whatever hap- 
pens on its remotest fringe. 

Radio today is as full of startling 
events as a free-for-all in a Klondike 
dance hall. New tubes, new sets, 
new selling methods, new programs, 
pop up overnight and are accepted as 
commonplaces almost before they're 
out of short pants. Facsimile and 
television have long since passed out 
of the stage of visionary speculation. 
Both are settling down onto a solid 
basis of laboratory achievement. 
Radio is beginning to juggernaut to- 
ward greater things. 

So don't let any body tell you that 
radio is slowing up, that the indus- 
try's youth is behind it. After fifteen 
years of radio development since the 
beginning of broadcasting, radio 
hasn't hegun to get started yet! 

All in same boat 

Out of the smoke and fire of the 
past decade of prosperity and depres- 
sion, one fact stands out — like a 
lighthouse in a fog: Common inter- 
ests thoroughly interlock all of the 
factors in the radio industry. 

We've all got our dogs under the 
same table — we're all in the same 
boat — anyway you want to say it. 
New developments already announced, 
as well as those still in their forma- 
tive stages, only serve to emphasize 
the close association between all the 
various elements in radio. 

Look at it this way. Without re- 
search in radio and electronics, we'd 
have nothing to sell. Without deal- 



ers and jobbers, manufacturers would 
have no market. Without manufac- 
turers, the dealers and jobbers would 
have no products to distribute. With- 
out broadcasters, radio sets would 
become useless pieces of mechanism. 
And without the radio industry and 
trade, broadcasters would have no 
listening audience. 

When the manufacturer finds it 
unprofitable to produce, or the trade 
to distribute, then research has no 
practical use and drifts into the calm 
of an academic Sargasso. 

Interlocked? Interdependent? 

So much so that nothing in the 
future can dis-entangle the ties that 
bind the present factors in radio. 
Indeed, the future, with its new de- 
velopments and services, merely pre- 
sages stronger and more tightly ce- 
mented mutual interests between set 
makers, set sellers, set fixers, and 
program transmitters. 

Must know 

With interlocking interests and 
mutual problems so obvious, it is 
clear that every factor in radio must 
keep abreast of the developments in 
every other phase of the industry. 
Broadcasting, manufacturing, engi- 
neering, wholesaling and retailing 
are not now and probably never have 
been self-centered and independent 
functions. The need for frequent 
and authoritative interchange of news 
and information within the radio in- 
dustry has never been more acute. 
The need will grow as new develop- 
ments carry radio forward to public 
services and sales opportunities un- 
dreamed of a few years ago. 

Broadcasters, for example, must 
keep abreast of new developments in 
radio products. With more than 
20,000,000 automobiles in use, a fast 
upward surge in auto-radio installa- 
tions may increase the broadcasters' 
markets and offer new circulation 
figures for broadcast advertising 
salesmen. Facsimile broadcasting and 
television, sooner or later, must in- 
evitably reshuffle the whole structure 
of policies and methods in the prep- 
aration of radio programs and the 
sale of time. The market for radio 
on non-electric farms is right now 
taking on a sudden expansion, offer- 



ing broadcast advertisers a better 
opportunity to reach the farm mar- 
ket. In all of these developments, 
the broadcaster as well as the radio 
trade has a vital concern. 

And manufacturers must know 
what's going on, not only in manu- 
facturing and merchandising, but in 
broadcasting and research. Manu- 
facturers must know when new serv- 
ices such as facsimile and television 
will be ready for the market so that 
the trade and broadcasters may co- 
operate in the public interest for the 
inauguration of such services; they 
must know and assist in the solution 
of wholesale and retail problems, for 
without a prosperous distribution 
function, manufacturing can hardly 
hope for profits. 

Tell Mr. and Mrs. 

And the retail and wholesale trades 
themselves, besides being kingpins in 
merchandising, must be able to in- 
terpret developments in each of the 
other fields, not only from the stand- 
point of conducting their own busi- 
nesses more intelligently and more 
profitably, but from the position of 
interpreting them to their customers. 

Rural dealers, for instance, must 
keep fully informed as to new prod- 
ucts that may revolutionize farm sell- 
ing; city dealers must be alive to 
sales opportunities offered by experi- 
ments which may have their inception 
in the metropolitan areas ; all dealers 
must keep in touch with new pro- 
grams and the most popular programs 
to use as effective arguments in 
selling. 

Service men, too, must know how 
to install and service new sets, new 
circuits, new types of radio products 
as they appear on the market. These 
are just a few of the interlocking in- 
terests of everybody in radio, but 
they serve to indicate the importance 
of keeping informed on every phase 
of the radio business. 

Radio today is a fast-moving in- 
dustry. The future offers tremen- 
dous possibilities. Some of these 
possibilities are already common 
knowledge, and are eagerly antici- 
pated by the public. Others are still 
in the laboratory and no word of 
them has yet leaked out. But every- 
body in radio today is going to have 
to step lively from now on, to keep 
pace with these new forces. 

Look at the record. Yesterday it 
was crystal sets, ear-phones and acid 
batteries. Today it's auto radio, new 
tubes, and flossy cabinets. Tomorrow 
it will be television, facsimile — and 
God knows what! 

Yes, sir, this may be a cock-eyed 
business. But boy, it's going places ! 



16 



Radio Today 



HOW MUTUAL INTERESTS BIND 
ALL RADIO MEN TOGETHER 




PROMOTION 

■ INCREASES SALES VOLUME —3 OF PROGRAM 

KAUIU ^ / A FEATURES 

MANUFACTURER *«** n >/ 



RADIO 
DISTRIBUTOR 






QUALITY f\/v t 






SERVICE 

MAN 



HIGH 



POWER 



RE- STYLING 



OF SETS 



S^'o* 



AUt »e«c 



■ A ^ R 1A?« Audience 
«ND SETS PER HOUSE 




' ADD "IONAL «5 



XJ PROPER 
*0K* i MERCHANDISING 



CORRECT 
INSTALLATION 



COMPETENT 
SERVICING 



FEDERAL 

AND 

GOVERNMENTAL 



INCREASES 



KV jo\e»* c£ 



#r 



< 


4 




ii 


1 


c 




\ 


( 

* 


r 






1 


s 
r 


/ 


\ 


» 


r 




i 


■ 


C 


s 




u 



LISTENING PUBLIC 

20,000,000 HOMES WITH RADIOS 



RADIO TODAY 4EPTFMRCP IO*E 



kk 



ON THE AIR" 



Fall programs that will boost radio sales 



NBCs fall galaxy 

* Strings of artists lined 
up by NBC for fall programs have 
the "must" quality for listeners. Al- 
ways plans at Eockefeller Plaza for 
spectacular broadcasting events of a 
special nature, and chatter a-plenty 
about unusual hook-ups, but there's 
enough already announced on the 
regular programs to seize the inter- 
est of anyone subject to pull of big 
names. 

Witness the date made by NBC 
with gala Grace Moore, September 16, 
when the radiant warbler of the hit 
movies will be heard on WEAF Bed 
Net. Judging from the number of 
fans who flocked to "Love Me For- 
ever," the singer now has a following 
de luxe. 

Helen Hayes, woman of quality 
from the screen and stage, appears 
October 1, opening a series in which 
Miss Hayes' role remains the same. 
This feature, already a much-dis- 
cussed spot, is scheduled for WJZ 
Blue Net. 

Villa-bound Paderewski will play 
his first concert for an American 
broadcast for NBC-WJZ network in 
October. Totally Chopin, the pro- 
gram comes from the Paderewski 
quarters in Switzerland. 

Eddy Duchin and his Fire Chief 
Players get back to the air on the 
same date, October 1, and Tuesdays. 
He's the one who sweeps the orches- 
tra popularity contests, and this time 
he's on WEAF Bed Net. 

Also new and anticipated on NBC's 
list is the September 30 program 
titled Hammerstein's Music Hall. 
The Fitch Company, Cutex, Life 
Savers, Procter and Gamble, Balston 
Purina, Lorillard, American Badia- 
tor, and Ludens all will have new 
programs. 

Pope Pius XL 

The voice of Pope Pius XI will be 
heard on NBC-WEAF network on 
September 26 at 5 :30 p.m. in an ad- 
dress and papal benediction delivered 
at the close of the Eucharistic Con- 
gress, Cleveland, September 23-26. 

Jack Benny's new show September 
29, will include Michael Bartlett, 
rocketing tenor who sang with Grace 



Moore in her latest flicker. The 
Jessica Dragonette program will have 
the Cavaliers instead of the Bevelers 
from September 13 to October 18. 
Mills Brothers return to NBC via 
WEAF Bed Net, October 4. 

The latter four of NBC's half- 




Seventy years at a Steinway 



dozen big "Fall Broadcasts" are set 
for September 12, 19, 21, and 26. 
They will preview autumn news in 
fashions, literature, football and art, 
in that order. Frank Healy is mas- 
ter of ceremonies and the biggest 
shots in each field will be heard. 

Wheatena has dragged the widely- 
watched Popeye, the Sailorman, from 
the comics and has landed him, with 
benefit of spinach, in the NBC studios 
with the mike turned on September 
10. The Pacific coast network gets 
this feature three days a week. 

Tuesdays in September over WEAF 
mark the new programs of Deems 
Taylor and Sigmund Bomberg as 
commentator and conductor, assisted 
by various soloists. Composer Taylor 
is famous for "Peter Pobetson" and 
other operas and is universally ap- 
plauded as a musical critic, while 
Mr. Bomberg has "The Student 
Prince" to his credit as well as melo- 
dies like "The Desert Song." 



CBS signs headliners 

* Half a dozen of the 
country's favorites are in the impres- 
sive Autumn announcements from 
CBS. Columbia has more than its 
share of commanding air bills for 
September, returning some impor- 
tant stars to the air who rank second 
to none in listener interest, and spon- 
soring new names which rate sensa- 
tional spots. 

Alexander Woollcott, glib with 
some of the finest stories in the lan- 
guage, will greet his fans on October 
6. Able Eddie Cantor and his stooge 
are due for October 6, and of course 
by that time the new daily schedule 
for the crack "March of Time" broad- 
cast will be well under way. 

A nation-wide WABO broadcast 
gets Lawrence Tibbett on September 
24, on a program definitely the sub- 
ject of talk among most musical fans. 
October 1 sees the appearance of 
Kate Smith again, with A&P, to sing 
three times a week and on the same 
day an elegant newcomer, Deane 
Janis, gets under way. 

Atwater Kent will be back to CBS 
on September 19, pretentious as ever, 
concentrating on concert and operatic 
stars with a huge concert orchestra. 

Harvester Cigar, M a 1 1 e x , and 
Camel will have new programs for 
CBS on September 12, September 15, 
and October 1, respectively. 

Henry and highbrows 

Ford's CBS Sunday hour, Septem- 
ber 29, uses tops musicians until De- 
cember 22. This list includes Jascha 
Heifetz, Lucrezia Bori, Julius Huehn, 
Dalies Frantz, Bichard Crooks, Jo- 
seph Szigeti, Mischa Levitzki, Cyrena 
van Gordon, Kirsten Flagstad, Albert 
Spalding, Lauritz Melchoir, Elizabeth 
Bethberg, and an operatic quartet 
consisting of Grete Stueckgold, Kath- 
ryn Meisle, Bichard Crooks, and Ezio 
Pinza. 

Two bright stars from the Metro- 
politan Opera will open a concert 
series on October 2 with WABC. 
Lily Bons, soprano, and Nino Martini, 
tenor, will be heard weekly with a 
concert orchestra directed by Andre 
Kostelanetz. 

Burns and Allen, comedy pair with- 
out an equal, have been signed by the 
tomato juice section of Campbell's 
Soup, for a new series beginning 
October 2. CBS will add 29 stations 
to the old Burns-Allen network for 
these new Wednesday programs. 

Phil Baker, one of the four-star 
radio personalities, has been signed 
by CBS for a Sunday series begin- 
ning September 29. 



18 



Radio Today 



Mutual s merry-go-round 

* At a time when the 
go-round in Washington is specially 
merry and the place throbs with po- 
litical intrigue, Mutual steps in and 
fixes a hook-up with listeners. Plans 
are not complete for the government 
feature but Drew Pearson and Robert 
Allen will be on the air October 1, 
with their famous low-down on capi- 
tal developments. 

"Lamp Lighter" Jacob Tarshish 
will return to WOE, WLW, and 
WGN, four days a week, beginning 
October 1. 

The first part of the series of high- 
brow musical programs to be played 
by famous chamber music groups un- 
der the auspices of the Library of 
Congress Division of Music, will be 
heard exclusively over WOR and 
MBS beginning October 29, and run- 
ning eight weeks. Topflight quar- 
tets and sextets, such as Kroll, Gor- 
don, and Musical Art, will play 
Tuesday afternoons from 4 to 5. 

"Jeannine in Lilac Time" debuts 
with MBS on September 23, spon- 
sored by Pinaud. The feature has a 
spotlight vocalist from the West as 
"Jeannine" and a low register orches- 
tra with a male octette. 

Albert Payson Terhune's famous 
knack for telling engrossing dog 
stories will get a new medium on 
September 29, when original drama- 
tizations of his tales will be heard 
over WOR, the Mutual System, and 
WNAC, Boston. The attraction was 
announced by Mutual on the 9th of 
August, and by NBC on the 12th. 



WITH THE BROADCASTERS 




National appetite for his chatter 



Radio Research 
Bureau 

* Mission of the infant 
Radio Research Bureau is described 
as similar to the position of ABC 
(Audit Bureau of Circulation) in 
publishing. However, the new radio 
bureau will have to decide on methods 
of counting radio circulation before 
it can begin work, as leaders in the 
project do not yet agree on a sound 
approach. RRB will doubtless begin 
with examination of current methods 
for determining the right number of 
sets in the country, then to tabulation 
of auto radios and so on to accurate 
totals in reachable sets. 

Means for measuring circulation 
will be expensive, and it is understood 
that broadcasters have financed the 
early activity of the new bureau. 
Meetings are being held now among 
the 15 gentlemen responsible for pre- 
liminary plans; Arthur B. Church, 
KMBC, Kansas City, is the key fig- 
ure, and his first associates are John 
Benson, of American Association of 
Advertising Agencies, and Paul West, 
of Association of National Adver- 
tisers. 

Representing National Association 
of Broadcasters on the committee are 
Edgar Kobak, NBC; H. K. Boice. 
CBS ; A. J. McCosker, WOR, and J. 
0. Maland, WHO, Des Moines. From 
ANA are M. H. Leister, D. P. 
Smelser, Harold B. Thomas, and 
Stuart Peabody. AAAA sends Fred 
Gamble, L. D. H. Weld, George Gal- 
lup, and Charles Gannon. 

Small dailies 
resent radio 

* For those who imagine 
that all is well in press-radio rela- 
tions, recent surveys present some- 
what upsetting proof that the view 
is slightly over-optimistic. One side 
or the other still digs an occasional 
trench in the war that was supposed 
to be settled by the Press Radio 
Bureau. 

Country-sides are strewn with pub- 
lishers who consider radio a direct 
competitor in news and advertising, 
say the surveys, although the situa- 
tion is more quiet among metropoli- 
tan sheets. One survey, made among 
the members of the Inland Daily 
Press Association, ended in the dis- 
covery that nearly 75 per cent of the 
publishers questioned consider "news- 



casting" now a definite handicap to 
newspapers. It also revealed a de- 
cline in radio programs as paid ad- 
vertising and disclosed that some 
editors are actually killing stories of 
speeches after they have been broad- 
cast. The Inland publishers practi- 
cally said that they were through 
giving radio news the breaks, and it 
was important to note that only six 
of them were mixed up in station 
ownership. 



Reveals public s 
listening habits 

* What the listening 
tastes of the public are can now be 
ascertained both as to time and sta- 
tion. The commercial value of such 
information is very great just now — 
it becomes possible for the broadcaster 
to know the coverage and the percent- 
age of people in a given area who 
listen to his station; and the sponsor 
of a radio program can readily de- 
termine the popularity of his enter- 
tainment. The manufacturer can find 
out what kind of programs the public 
desires and design his receivers ac- 
cordingly. 

In one form of listener analyzer a 
record of the hours the receiver was 
operated and the station to which the 
owner was listening, is obtained on 
a paper tape driven by a clock motor. 
The tape can be made of such a 




Love her forever 



September, 1935 



19 



length as to run for over a month, 
but a week is usually a sufficiently 
long period of time, for the record 
soon becomes passe and valueless. 

Although perfected two and one- 
half years ago by Professors B. F. 
Elder and L. F. Woodruff of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy, the device has only recently been 
put into production. 

With the information obtained 
from a survey using these instruments 
installed on some five hundred to a 
thousand receivers, the broadcaster 
would be in a position to talk to his 
customers in terms of the percentage 
of the listening audience who tune to 
his station. The advertiser can then 
know the effectiveness of his pro- 
grams and advertising talks. A sta- 
tion management is able to obtain 
statistics on the value of various 
hours and charge extra prices for 
times when the listening public is 
greatest. 

The cost of conducting a survey 
of a metropolitan area by this new 
method is about one-tenth of the cost 
of conducting a similar, though less 
comprehensive, survey by telephone. 
Outstanding is the fact that the rec- 
ord covers all hours of the day. 



Radio's Pulitzer Prize 

* The annual uproar 
which accompanies the awarding of 
the Pulitzer prizes in letters may 
find itself duplicated in radio, if the 
provoking proposal of the Radio 
Manufacturers Association is taken 



seriously as it deserves. The idea 
would be to pick yearly best features 
in broadcasting, similar to the plan 
of the Pulitzer board. Probably un- 
aware of what they started in the 
way of critical fanfare, executives of 
the BMA, led by Powel Crosley, Jr., 
Cincinnati, presented the proposal to 
the National Association of Broad- 
casters, where it was roundly liked. 

European programs — Royal 

* John F. Royal, NBC 
vice-president and program mentor, 
is back from 17 European countries 
and uses the word "radio-conscious" 
to describe it all. Propaganda broad- 
casting, "Listening groups," and a 
popular passion for American dance 
music are in his report. 

Mr. Eoyal found the Germans 
planning a big new short-wave sta- 
tion. The Dutch still support their 
broadcasting by popular subscription. 
The Italians accent opera. All show 
a tendency toward world broadcasting. 

Plans for coming NBC broadcasts 
from Europe were mentioned on Mr. 
Royal's return, and it appears that 
the war zone, if any, in Ethiopia, 
will receive NBC's serious attention. 
A trial pick-up of ancient history 
lessons from the Colosseum, the 
Acropolis, the Appian Way, and other 
famous historical spots is on the way. 
Broadcasts from Greenland and Ice- 
land are also in the plans, as well 
as an increased number of exchanges 
with the British Broadcasting Cor- 
poration. 



Hearing him "Tell the Judge' 




Recognizing that everyhody Wees to listen in on court-room testimony, station 
WIP, Philadelphia, has been broadcasting traffic-court proceedings. 



Advice to listeners 

* High time, say re- 
sourceful observers, we had some 
well-planned guidance in the mass of 
programs now rampant in the ether. 

Check, says Mr. Pitts Sanborn, 
and points to the efforts of his Eadio 
Institute of the Audible Arts, as an 
earnest and systematic endeavor in 
that direction. 

The Institute, founded by the 
Philco Eadio and Television Corpora- 
tion, has had results. After only a 
few months of operation, its method 
has attracted the interest of several 
thousand scattered educators, libra- 
rians, and musical leaders. 

The Institute originally contacted 
civic leaders, community centers, 
music groups, school executives, club 
officials, welfare leaders, library 
supervisors, and other key persons 
whose activity concerns local organi- 
zations. The list of correspondents 
soon mounted to 25 grand. It prom- 
ised to become a clearing house for 
program ideas and criticism; it set 
out to sharpen the public appetite for 
the quality programs by accenting 
the advantages and special uses of 
the better program material. The 
Institute also outlined plans for lec- 
ture and discussion meetings, and 
listening groups, and it issued bro- 
chures with recommended programs 
and pertinent advance information. 
It got up a list of available literature 
on the subject and distributed it free. 
(Example: How To Utilize Eadio in 
Teaching Music.) 

Kathleen Goldsmith, Mr. Pitts' 
director, gets many letters from deal- 
ers who actually say that sales have 
increased because prospects made 
program discoveries through the In- 
stitute's work. Parent Teachers' 
Associations and similar organiza- 
tions have taken up the idea of 
"listening groups." Elderly people 
and shut-ins have unearthed new pro- 
gram possibilities to interest them. 



Studio on sideivalk 

• WIMB studios, Jack- 
son, Mich., are on the ground floor 
and are doing plenty about the pros- 
pects for a street spectacle. Main 
Studio "A" has the look of a huge 
show window, resplendent with ultra 
modern fixtures, flood lights, and new 
style reflector buttons. Not content, 
WIMB has engaged artist Allan 
Thomas to do a huge 38 by 7 mural 
for a side wall and when the finished 
canvass gets the lights on it, it's 
supposed to be the most spectacular 
spot in Jackson. 



20 



Radio Today 






Panorama of W O R 50 KW Broadcast Station 



ISOLANTITE PLAYS AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN 
THE MODERN BROADCAST TRANSMITTER 

The 50 KW. Transmitter recently built by Western 
Electric for Station WO R employs ISOLANTITE 
liberally. 

In this up-to-date station are strain insulators, concen- 
tric transmission line spacers and end seals, stand-offs, 
switches, shafts, inductance supports, power and rec- 
tifier tube supports, condenser cases, pedestals and 
many other parts of ISOLANTITE. 

To improve your equipment, specify ISOLANTITE 
insulation. Isolantite Inc., 233 Broadway, New York, 
N.y. Factory at Belleville, N. J. 

Represented by GRAYBAR ELECTRIC CO. 





fciSs „ 







WHAT DO YOU MEAN- 
RADIO FACSIMILE? 



• NEWSPAPERS and maga- 
zines printed by radio in homes 
everywhere ! 

Wait and see. 

Just as the invention of the print- 
ing press abruptly switched the course 
of civilization many years ago, today 
"radio facsimile," a new and far 
more miraculous extension of the 
graphic arts is nearing commerciali- 
zation, with the probable result of 
tremendous changes in present meth- 
ods of the distribution of knowledge 
and news. 

The new development will whisk 
printed pages into homes and remote 
places with the speed of light (or 
radio, which is the same thing) ■ — 
with a stunning effect on publishing 
and advertising fields. In fact, a 
metropolitan newspaper, complete 
with headlines, display advertising, 
cartoons, all of them typographically 
up-to-the-minute, can now be laid 
down at the most distant fireside 
without the aid of physical transpor- 
tation facilities. 

Important news events will receive 
a new treatment. Within a few 
minutes after they happen, they will 
be recorded, in full printed display 



with pictures, and will actually be 
delivered in reader homes. The pres- 
ent newspaper treatment, which re- 
quires at least six or eight hours, will 
be definitely outmoded. 

Here are the details of the devel- 
opment. 

In most cases, the Great American 
Family may sit around the radio all 
evening, let us say, but when mid- 
night rolls around, the music is shut 
off, the family retires. But the radio 
set may be made to work the rest of 
the night, using the same tubes and 
waves. Switched to a button labelled 
"Radio Newspaper" the set will get 
busy with printing a news record in 
the regular newspaper page style. 
And in the morning the family will 
find in a basket under the receiving 
set, a complete newspaper, including 
headlines, pictures, display ads, style 
forecasts, weather reports, advertising- 
offers, and whatever else is appro- 
priate to the day. What is. more 
revolutionary, the "radio" paper will 
include the news up to a few minutes 
before it is clicked out in the home. 
Compared with the metropolitan 
news sheet, which local families may 
have to travel a few miles to get, it 
will be a complete "scoop." 



nt» r»M»r» 



THE NEW YOBK SUN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 




.ii*,... 

■ YuuTbinlt Editoi 
*rr Of "P#i>tt«irt" 

ii In Dw bopc (Ij.1 
-h hfcpfry t*l»(lotie 



Newspaper page transmitted by radio fac- 
simile process developed by 0. J. Young, 
Camden, N. J. 



Radio research men call the new 
method "facsimile transmission" 
though it may well be dubbed "flash 
publishing" compared to the present 
method of newspaper production and 
delivery. 

Works all 24 hours 

It will be noted that this facsimile 
newspaper process has the special 
advantage of putting the broadcasters' 
costly and elaborate radio equipment 
to work during the early morning 
hours, when it is now standing idle. 
The 23 million receiving sets, too, 
now idle between the hours of 1 to 
6 a.m. will have work to do that will 
be vital and important to their 
owners. The "cumulative" service, 
working during the night reproduc- 
ing printed and pictorial matter will 
open limitless opportunities for new 
advertising revenues to the broad- 
casters, both in display service and 
in whatever other media this develop- 
ment may bring along with it. Since 
the radio newspaper will reach the 
very last receiving set throughout the 
country, no matter how remote, its 
advertising importance can scarcely 
be over-rated. 

The new printing attachment 
needed in the home for the produc- 
tion of the radio sheet is so simple 
that its principle of operation is 
readily understood by those without 
a technical vocabulary. 

It is generally understood that a 
radio loud speaker produces sound 
by vibrating a diaphragm, and that 
it is these vibrations, corresponding 
to the sounds of music, voice, etc., 
which set the loudspeaker diaphragm 
into movement. Thus, broadcasters 
send electrical vibrations correspond- 
ing to sounds made in their studios, 
to receivers throughout the land. If 
watched closely, the loudspeaker dia- 
phragm can be seen to vibrate par- 
ticularly when low notes (slow vibra- 
tions) are being reproduced. 

It is apparent that if the incoming 
vibrations are fed to a control mag- 
net on a moving stylus, rather than 
to a loudspeaker, the stylus (or mov- 
ing pen) will be lifted on and off the 
paper as vibrations are received. It 
follows that if the pen or stylus can 
be made to move regularly across a 
paper in closely parallel lines, one 



22 



Radio Today 



below the other, the lifting and low- 
ering of the pen will produce a pic- 
ture. Small type can be reproduced 
in the same way, if the stylus is deli- 
cately adjusted to lines made very 
close together. 

The stylus or marker on the new 
facsimile systems may vary in type 
or design but in all cases it moves 
regularly across a paper in fine par- 
allel lines, guided by the impulses re- 
ceived by the set in the same way 
that sound vibrations are reproduced 
in ordinary broadcasting. 

Replacing the loudspeaker on the 
home facsimile receiving set that is 
thus needed (1) a magnet coil to vi- 
brate the stylus instead of the loud- 
speaker and (2) a synchronous mech- 
anism to feed the marker across the 
sheet of paper, a line at a time, fol- 
lowing the photocell at the trans- 
mitter station. The synchronizing 
may be accomplished either by tim- 
ing signals sent along with the im- 
pulses, or by the use of a synchro- 
nous-motor mechanism hooked to the 
power system. 

The development of facsimile serv- 
ice in homes presents such boundless 
possibilities that some promoters of 
the system have been inspired to sug- 
gest that facsimile broadcasters be 
given a special set of shortwaves. 
Not confined to the early-morning 
period on the waves, the service would 
allow users to tune in on printed 
features of all kinds at any time of 
the day — a continuous "magazine of 
the air" — comic strips, magazine dis- 
plays, roto sections, educational ma- 
terial, and dozens of printed features 
which may be developed for that use 
specially. 

Facsimile broadcasting, it should 




be pointed out, gives the networks a 
perfect method of getting printed 
radio programs into local homes, if 
the newspapers ever decide not to 
print them. The new service may 
give the broadcasters the final ad- 
vantage over the newspapers in the 
matter of news presentation, also, if 
press-radio relations are not satis- 
factorily settled otherwise. Broad- 
casters now have it in their power 
to deliver a complete newspaper into 
radio homes, which may be the next 
step, with display ads to finance it. 
Plans for the use of facsimile cou- 
pons, to give advertisers a definite 



check on audiences, have already been 
projected. 

The inevitable commercialization 
of facsimile transmission seems cer- 
tain to lead the current newspaper 
owners to a back seat. The process 
of news and ad distribution will take 
on a lightning speed which will mark 
present lumbering newspaper plants 
as relics of a by-gone day. Awakened 
to facsimile possibilities, its enormous 
advantage, its directness of opera- 
tion, the public will regard delivered 
newspapers as ridiculously slow and 
obsolete, except for review material. 
Quick news will go to the air. 



TELEVISION TODAY 



Facsimile receiver of W. G. H. Finch, 
Washington, D. C. 



* FIRST JOB of the new 
joint Television Committee recently 
appointed by RCA and NBC, to oper- 
ate under chairmanship of Dr. W. R. 
G. Baker, will be to coordinate pres- 
ent knowledge of television art. 

Was found that specialists work- 
ing with committee, while possessing 
profound knowledge of their own 
fields — cathode-ray tubes, transmit- 
ters, short-wave characteristics, etc. 
— were not sufficiently familiar with 
other possibilities outside own spe- 
cialties. Television art is so com- 
plex that each specialist must know 
much about interrelation of his own 
field to potentialities in other divi- 
sions. 

Field tests come next, and appara- 
tus is now being built for these. 
That million dollars mentioned is 
really going to be spent, but it may 
be a year before field tests get fully 
going. "At least a year or two" be- 
fore television turns into Fifth Ave- 
nue, is the cautious answer given to 
the question everybody asks. 

Independents Plan Network 

Plans for an independent nation- 
wide television network have been 
discussed in New York and Washing- 
ton during recent weeks. It is pro- 
posed to set up fifteen 20-kw. key 
stations at $100,000 each; forty local 
5-kw. stations at $25,000 each; and 
250 beam relay stations having a 25- 
mile range for interconnecting the 
network stations. Initial cost is esti- 
mated at four millions dollars, with 
operating cost of one million dollars 
yearly. 

In Philadelphia, Philo T. Farns- 
worth has been demonstrating his 
television system to audiences in his 
Germantown laboratory. The trans- 
mission consisted of Mickey Mouse, 



a musical comedy, and an orchestra's 
performance, and was received on a 
screen 5yi x 7 inches. While remark- 
able clarity for the images was 
claimed, at times they were observed 
to oscillate. The Farnsworth trans- 
mitter employs the oscillight and 
magnetic focussing in the studio 
pick-up. 

Reinforcing the television develop- 
ment program is the announcement 
of FCC authorization for the co- 
axial television cable designed by the 
Bell Laboratories, to be laid between 
Philadelphia and New York. Such 
million-cycle cable, costing about 
$6,000 per mile, offers a possibility of 
piping television programs over the 
country in the manner of today's 
chain broadcasts. The initial 90-mile 
installation will represent an invest- 
ment of a million dollars, with ter- 
minal equipment for 200 telephone 
channels all carried over the single 
conductor. 

English Progress 

In England television has been pre- 
sented to the public, but low-defini- 
tion, 30-line pictures have been the 
rule. The transmissions, twice a week, 
last from half to three-quarters of an 
hour. Live talent is used and the 
pictures do have an entertainment 
value for short periods — on the order 
of half an hour. It is estimated that 
less than one hundred families in 
England have television receivers. 
The British Post Office hopes to have 
high-definition- transmission late this 
winter or early in the spring. Ultra- 
high frequencies will be employed in 
presenting daily programs of about 
three hours' duration. The minimum 
price of television receivers available 
in Great Britain is estimated to be 
$250. 



September, 1935 



23 



WHAT I WOULD STOCK THIS FALL 



Merchandiser talks about radio dealer s buying problems 



By H. L. M. Capron* 

* MANY persons who have spent 
the best years of their lives in the 
radio business, and who certainly 
should know it, hold the opinion that 
the year 1935 will rival good old 1929 
in point of sales. In support of this 
belief the facts and trends of the in- 
dustry are freely quoted. They cer- 
tainly point to a great year. 

Nationally, about 63 per cent of the 
homes now have radio, ranging from 
a low of 24 per cent in Mississippi and 
28 per cent in Arkansas, to a high of 
90 per cent in the District of Colum- 
bia, 90 per cent in New York, 87 per 
cent in New Jersey, 82 per cent in 
Illinois and 80 per cent in Maryland. 

In spite of this apparent market 
saturation, these are the facts which 
point to a banner year's business : 

1. About 15,000,000 of the radios in 
use are from 3 to 7 years old, and may 
properly be classed as obsolete. 

2. Excellent compact radios have 
found a very definite demand as per- 
sonal and "second" radio. 

3. The trend in unit sales has been 
sharply upward since 1932. 

4. The trend in unit prices has been 
upward since 1933. 

Flood tide 

The flood tide of the replacement 
market has started to flow strongly, 
and this year the following influences 
will speed it up : 

1. All-wave radio that will really 
give good foreign reception. 

2. All metal tubes, around which a 
great selling story will be woven. 

3. Higher fidelity, a much closer 
approach to really lifelike tone, which 
every radio owner wants. 

4. The greatest collective manufac- 
turer's advertising campaigns since 
1929, which cannot but create a 
greater urge to buy these really bet- 
ter radios. 

Each dealer will probably get his 
full share of this added business if 
he goes after it. And he may be rea- 
sonably sure that if he is not getting 
it, that his competitor is. 

Planning your purchases and stock, 

*For the past 14 years manager of 
one of the largest retail radio busi- 
nesses in the world. Charts and fig- 
ures compiled by Mr. Capron from 
original sources. 



and your sales promotion, is going to 
be mighty important this year, too. 

Too heavy stocks are certainly to 
be avoided, though one major manu- 
facturer already reports sales in ex- 
cess of supply. 

Based upon the records of many 
stores in all parts of the country over 
a period of ten years, you may reason- 
ably expect to do 8% of your total 
year's business in September, 11% in 
October, 14% in November, and 
18^2% in December. If you take 
your actual August business as 5%, 
the above ratios will serve as an ex- 
cellent guide to your buying. Total 
business should range between 22% 
and 25% better than 1934. 

Money in the pocket 

Do not buy discounts, for long dis- 
counts are no more indication of 
profits than long odds are an indica- 
tion of large winnings at the track. 
You have got to SELL the radio 
AND GET THE MONEY before 
you can count a profit earned. 

Because of uncertainty in the tube 
situation, protect your position by 
having in stock sets using all three 
types of tubes — glass, metal, and the 
glass-metal combination. 

Give full importance to the co- 
operative selling helps that the manu- 
facturer will give you, and the long 
time reputation, too. 

Based upon an annual business of 
$10,000, a model stock would be 
comprised of : — 
COMPACTS— 33% of total units, 

and 12% of total value. 
TABLE MODELS-^0% of total 
units and 32% of total value. 



CONSOLES— 27% of total units and 
56% of total value. 
Within these broad classifications 
the ratios and price ranges constitut- 
ing the best sellers are : 







COMPACTS 




2 


leaders @ 


$10 to $15 


$30.00 




2 


@ 


20 


40.00 




4 


@ 


25 


100.00 




1 


(n> 


30 


30.00 




1 


@ 


35 


35.00 


$235.00 




TABLE JIODELS 




2 


@ 


30 


60.00 




2 


@ 


40 


80.00 




4 


@ 


50 


200.00 




2 


@ 


SO 


120.00 




1 


@ 


70 


70.00 




1 


" ' @ 


90 


90.00 


$620.00 






CONSOLES 




1 


<g> 


50 


50.00 




1 


@ 


70 


70.00 




■A 


@ 


110 


330.00 




1 


@ 


125 


125.00 




1 


& 


175 


175.00 




1 


(a) 


275 


275.00 


$1,025.00 



This model stock for a ten thou- 
sand dollar business has a retail value 
of $1,880, and an average unit value 
of $62.66 It is not a complete assort- 
ment, but concentrates in fast-moving 
price ranges, and is a perfectly safe 
commitment for October. 

If your annual volume is in excess 
of $10,000, this stock can be built up 
to one appropriate to your business 
by adding 50% in each price range 
and classification, and $500 to broaden 
assortment and price range for each 
ten thousand dollars by which your 
business exceeds the base. 

Model stocks should be maintained 
on the basis of actual sales plus the 
expected normal sales of the next 
month. The chart of monthly per- 
centage of annual sales will be a 
guide in this direction. It is desir- 
able to keep adequate stocks for cur- 
rent demand so that your customers 
may receive immediate delivery, and 
yet kept small enough so that ware- 



20 

15" 

-10 

5 
































K 






5tai 

5 


i 


















lormai r< 
adio sale 


1 

































































<iu<a<DD5iiJUOuj 

■^"-5<2 — > — » < <0 O Z O 

Relative business the radio dealer should expect to do, month by month 



24 



Radio Today 



housing, investment, interest, insur- 
ance, and handling may be within 
reason, and new developments, or a 
sudden shift in consumer preference 
may not require liquidation at a loss. 

1. Annual National Eadio Sales 

This chart tells a mighty interest- 
ing and important story. 

In 1929 radio sales reached a peak 
of $600,000,000.00 and fell to about 
$130,000,000.00 in 1932. That is a 
loss of 78%. It is staggering. But 
look at the sales curve turn sharply 
upward in 1933 and 1934 — while most 
business is making but small gains. 
That indicates the degree with which 
the replacement demand — and the 
"second'' set need — has set in. 

In 1934 we actually sold more units 
than 1928— and only 10% less than 
1929. With metal tubes— all-wave— 
and- higher fidelity we should sell 
more units in 1935 than in 1929. 

All of the trends indicated on this 
chart breed encouragement — even en- 
thusiastic optimism. 

With a total of some 25,000,000 
radio sets in use — and a normal re- 
placement cycle of 5 years — it is in- 
dicated that normal replacement busi- 
ness should be 4,400,000 radio — plus 
500,000 new families yearly — and we 
actually look forward to a normal sale 
of more units than our previous peak. 
What a business to be in. 

If our normal business settles down 
to some 4,900,000 radio per year — it 
becomes quite apparont that our dol- 
lar volume — and that is what we "pay 
off" on — will be vitally affected by the 
"average unit price." Every dealer 
can lend his efforts in his own inter- 
ests as well as the industry's — by ad- 
vertising — displaying and selling — ■ 
the highest quality, highest priced 
radio models. 

2. Best Selling Price Ranges 

This chart, when compared with the 
Sales Chart, plainly shows how pro- 





















ou 


















I J 








v Averaqe Unib Prices 




/ U 








\s 


in dollars 


• • 


fcj 














s 




l~60 


















o J 


















OU 


















t5 




/ v\ 








* 


* 


^0 


/ 




\ % 


Number «ji aeia j>oiu in ,- 
* >. _ hundred thousands,-' f 


* 


05 


/ 






% 


k* 1 ' 




/ 

• 




yj 










V 








63 


Dollar value of sets 


^ x 










20 


in tens of millions 


•' X 










1 5 


















IU 


192fi 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 



Chart No. 1 — How total U.S. radio sales have run, year by year, compiled 
from Government reports 



found an effect table models and com- 
pacts have had on our industry. 

They tore down the average unit 
price and put everyone on his mettle 
to make a profit — and they weeded out 
the weak. But they revitalized the 
industry — perhaps revolutionized it. 
They broadened the market base 
greatly, and filled the need of the 
"personal radio." Table models even 
overlap the console price demand, too 
— because it is a fact — that the table 
model, dollar for dollar, represents a 
much better radio. Doesn't that chart 
indicate to you that the public is buy- 
ing quality — and wants the best it 
can afford? It does to me — and that 
is very important in your buying and 
selling to keep in mind. 



There is one sour note struck by 
this chart, too. 

Notice that the 1935 trend in com- 
pact price range has turned down. 
Many manufacturers — in a mad searcli 
for sales — have given chain, depart- 
ment and some big radio stores com- 
pact radio sets built with low price 
as the only consideration. When 
these are consistently advertised — 
and superlatives are used to describe 
them — it is natural for the public to 
believe that a ten-dollar bill will buy 
a good little radio. That's the power 
of suggestion. 



$10 jalopies 



















lOO 
















90 






%K Consoles ^\y^>', 






60 














■ 70 














60 

- so — 


Table 














Models ^s$; 












fO 












tTTTTTT 




30 














Wo 


1 1 1 1 1 
mpachs 


20 














+*- *»*, 


"-UJ4 


10- 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 



Chart No. 2 — Price ranges of various types of sets 



A very large number of stores are 
now selling these sets. 

The writer has tested dozens and 
dozens of them — and has yet to see 
the first one good enough to put his 
name on. 

Advertising and selling inferior 
radio at any price is a very short- 
sighted policy — if you want to stay 
in business. The customer certainly 
cannot be satisfied with a poor radio — 
and it is a fact purchasers soon for- 
get what they paid — but long remem- 
ber what they got. 

Think twice before you buy such 
radio — and send the customer away 
having spent half what she should — 
with a radio that isn't worth half 
what she did pay. 



September, 1935 



25 




THE FARM MARKET FOR RADIO 



ENGINEERING 



Ken-Rad 

RadioTubes 

DEPENDABLE LONG LIFE 



First-class engineering 
methods used. Write for 
complete information. 



Glass or Metal 
Radio Tubes 




THE KEN-RAD CORPORATION 

Incorporated 

Division (if 

The Ken - Rad Tube and Lamp Corp. 
OWENSBORO, KY. 

Also Mfrs. of 

Ken - Rad Incandescent Electric Lamps 



* Rural America's great 
radio market has long remained un- 
developed, because not until now, 
Autumn, 1935, has there appeared 
the combination of factors which 
gives radio dealers special opportuni- 
ties in the field. 

Upturns in farm product prices, the 
more substantial after-effects of the 
first New Deal farm legislation, the 
development of completely satisfac- 
tory sets for unwired homes, and the 
appearance of reasonably priced sets 
not requiring the use of storage bat- 
teries, appear this Fall in a combina- 
tion altogether new in its advantages 
to dealers. 

Some two dozen of the leading 
radio manufacturers have by this 
time perfected improved sets to be 
offered to rural listeners at new low 
prices with all the features of the 
finest all-electrical sets built. The 
new batteries designed to accompany 
the improved sets are cheaper and 
smaller and have features of sim- 
plicity, constant voltage, high capac- 
ity, and long life which are certain 
to give dealers the final selling point 
where it is needed. 

As the news reels have pointed out, 
the drought and dust storms are all 
past, and the agricultural areas have 
settled down to reaping good harvests 
for which better prices are paid. Rural 
disasters have been replaced by 
swelled incomes. The latest com- 
merce report reveals that the national 
income from farm products in June 
was $438,000,000, and that farmers of 
the nation received additional cash 
benefits from AAA payments boost- 
ing their total income to $487,000,000. 
Last year at the same time the income 
from products amounted to $422,000,- 
000, and the cash benefits amounted 
to only $29,000,000. Thus the farm- 
ers had $36,000,000 more to spend for 
that single month than they had last 
year, and this is representative. 

Untouched 

Pointed researches among the ten 
million American families living in 
unwired homes show the untouched 
nature of the districts. Local owner- 
ship of telephones and automobiles 
has reached a much higher per cent 
than that of radios, even in propor- 
tion to the positions they hold in the 
levels of country life, and the ease 
with which they can be financed. 

By this time, taxes for the farmers 
have been reduced at least one-third 
from their peak. This, together with 



the fact that much of the first cash 
benefits paid through AA A curtail- 
ment was used to pay debts rather 
than to buy home equipment, again 
marks the farmer as a good radio 
prospect this Fall. 

No longer do farmers have to be 
wealthy to be counted as promising 
radio sales prospects. When radio 
manufacturers first made a play for 
their business, after the all-electrical 
sets had swept the country, the cheap- 
est air cell battery set they could buy 
was priced at about $150 complete. 
Now, the field has been developed 
until sets may be bought for as little 
as $32.50. With radio prices down, 
and farm budgets sound again, deal- 
ers should find a fertile field here. 

Slow to see 

E. £. Horine, engineer for the Na- 
tional Carbon Company, battery man- 
ufacturers, has' pointed out that 
''manufacturers were slow to see the 
possibilities in the rural field, and 
even yet do not have in many cases 
a system of distribution which is flex- 
ible enough to reach all rural districts 
properly, due to exclusive territory 
plans." 

"But the new scale of prices and 
the improvement of the sets show an 
awakening," was Mr. Horine's con- 
clusion. His company became inter- 
ested in the country's unwired homes 
about five years ago, and since then 
has spent thousands of dollars de- 
veloping an improved battery for 
them. 

Proof of the serious attention that 
other prominent manufacturers are 
now giving to these rural districts is 
the appearance of the new windmill 
generator. This device operates on 
the same principle as an automobile 
generator except that it is powered 
by a small and inexpensive propeller 
in the wind. Several manufacturers 
are now placing these units on the 
market and predict for them a great 
opportunity for creating radio sales 
in farm areas. 

With broadcast programs steadily 
growing finer and more interesting, 
radio manufacturers have looked 
about to see where most of the fam- 
ilies without home electricity service 
are living. It has been found that 
they are not grouped in the states 
which are regarded as typically agri- 
cultural, but are found in great num- 
bers in states which are essentially 
industrial. 



26 



Radio Today 



THE MOST IMPORTANT NEWS 
ON FARM RADIO IN 15 YEARS! 



O 



THE FAMOUS EVE READY 

AIR CELL "1000 HOUR" 

"A" BATTERY 

FORMERLY 



OAND NOW, NO MATTER 
WHAT KIND OF BATTERY 
SET YOU OWN, YOU JUST PLUG-IN 
EVEREADY"B"AND"C" BATTERIES! 




$ 



gso 



NOW 
ONLY 

$ 5» 



Think of it! Oniy $j.9o for the famous Eveready Air 
Cell "A" Battery ! It never needs recharging throughout 
its life ! Even if you use your radio set three hours every 
day, this battery will give you a full year's service. It 
brings you the finest, economical, trouble-free recep- 
tion! Eveready engineers made this low price possible 
by concentrating more power-making materials into 
less space . . . giving you, also, a more convenient- 
sized battery. 

Saves & to % your yearly "A" power cost ! 

Your initial expense is your only expense with an 
Eveready Air Cell. Because it never needs recharging, 
the Eveready Air Cell costs only about half as much 
per year as the average yearly cost of charging other 
kinds of "A" batteries, and only about Vi as much per 
year as dry "A" packs. And, in addition to t his sa vi 
gone forever is the nuisance of rec 
Battery or freque ntly. 



THESE WIRING TROUBLES 
GONE FOREVER! 




Each new Eveready "B" Battery and Eveready "C" 
Battery is equipped with a 3-hole socket and a handy 
removable plug. Wires from the set are connected to 
the plug and the plug stuck in the battery — as you 
plug in a radio tube — and the correct battery connec- 
tions are made. When you need a hew battery, you just 
pull the plug out of the old one and stick it in the new 
one. No wiring troubles ! These new plug-in Evereadys 
can be put right on the set you now have, without 
any change in the set. 

The socket holes are arranged so that they will go in 
only the right way — you can't make a wrong connection ! 

Start now— with your present set— to enjoy the 

trouble-free, economical radio entertainment 

these engineering feats make possible 

Your dealer now has these great new Eveready Bat- 
teries. Stop in soon and let him point out the bigjyj^ 
vantages these Evereadys have o ver all 
farm radio "B" and "C'L 




September, 1935 



27 



pioneering wins iea[ 



Year after year RCA has pioneered in radio, being 
the first to present discoveries, inventions and 
developments that have made radio what it is 
today. Vast sums have been made by those who 
followed RCA leadership — including jobbers 
and dealers. Still greater rewards await those 
who handle RCA products now and in the 

.. .- - 




Pioneering pays RCA ... it 



future. And that's your c 
Today the public is be 
certain of the fact that if 
must come to the origina» 
Let's look at the result c 
public acceptance of the 
are the actual figures: 




AVERAGE 
RCA VICTOR 
CONSOLE SALE 



* 



ill 



$ 



67 



Average console sale 
last year 

(McGraw-Hill figure) 



Already a great leader— RCA Victor 
C13-2, giving you the "Magic Eye", 
the "Magic Brain", and RCA Metal 
Tubes in a handsome console for 
only $189-50 list! A terrific value 
with its three sure-fire features, its 
12-inch speaker, its 5 bands tuning to 
140-410 and 540-60,000 kilocycles! 
All prices f. o. b. Camden, N. J., 
subject to change without notice. 



■I 



^m 



CA pioneering pays you 



nee for more profits! 
ming more and more 
ey want the best they 
ource of radio — RCA. 
his swiftly increasing 
uth about radio. Here 



Average console sale last year .... $67 

(McGraw-Hill figure) 

AVERAGE RCA VICTOR CONSOLE SALE $102 

Look at that increase of $35! That's 52%! That's 
the extra money that RCA Victor dealers took in 
against the general average of the field. Nothing 
produced this result but pioneering, plus aggres- 



sive sales and advertising methods to make the 
public conscious of the facts. 

Thus RCA has grown to leadership in the 
fine set field, dispelling forever the thought that 
there is money in cheapness. This year, there is no 
doubt we shall again far outstrip the industry, 
get more money for a quality product, make more 
money for our dealers. Pioneering pays. It pays 
us, it pays you, it pays the public. If you want to 
make real money in radio, feature RCA Victor! 



WHAT DEALERS SAY 



y/e were pleased to receive, in the 
orm of advertising literature, sta- 
ietics showing that last year RCA 
'ictor consoles eclipsed the aver- 
ge console unit sale by 52%. We 
vere greatly surprised at this figure 
lue to the fact that our average RCA 
Victor console price averages far 
bovethe$102.00 which you men- 
ioned. We have every reason to 
elieve on these 1936 models, that 
>ur average console sale will be 
tiuch greater than last year. — 
.auter's, Newark, N. J. 



For the past twelve months our 
Radio Department has enjoyed the 
most profitable business than for 
any like period since 1929. We at- 
tribute this to the fact thatthe public 
is generally demanding radio mer- 
chandiseof quality.The RCA Victor 
"Magic Brain" line introduced last 
Fall has played an important part in 
building higher unit sales in our 
department/The 1935 RCA Victor 
line will carry our sales to a new high 
this season. — Sctuggs,Vandervoort 
& Barney, St. Louis, Mo. 





The 

MAGIC 
EYE' 



u 



v>> 



The "Magic Eye" joins the "Magic 
Brain" and with RCA Metal Tubes 
gives the trade its great triple part- 
nership of sales features for 1936, 
proving once more that IT PAYS 
TO PIONEER. 



SEE THIS LIST OF RCA PIONEER ACHIEVEMENTS, 
EVERY ONE OF WHICH WORKS TO YOUR BENEFIT: 

First practical superheterodyne for home 



First power-operated dynamic-type loud 

speaket for the home. 
First tubes and radio powered from the 

light socket. 
Fitst cathode-ray tuning indicator, the 

"Magic Eye". 



First unit known as the "Magic Brain". 

Network broadcasting. 

Commercial inter-continental short-wave 
communication. 

Marine tadio. 

World-wide radio communication. 

And many others. 



VICTOR 

RCA Manufacturing Co., Inc. • Camden, New Jersey 



A SUBSIDIARY OF RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA . . . THE WORLD'S LARGEST RADIO ORGANIZATION. OTHER UNITS: NATIONAL 
BROADCASTING CO., INC. . . . R. C. A. COMMUNICATIONS. INC. . . . RCA RADIOTRON . . . RADIOMARINE CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



pr A has Pioneered in radio, being 
YearafteryearRCAh^ FO m and 

the first ro present d isc0 ^ er ' dio what it is 
developments that have made radi 

who handle RCA products now and in the 




Pioneering pay s RCA ...RCA pioneering pays you 



future. And that's yourchtnce for more profits! 
Today the public is becoming mora and more 
certain of the fact that if they want the best they 
must come to the original source of radio— RCA. 
Let's look at the result of this swiftly increasing 
public acceptance of the truth about radio. Here 
are the actual figures: 



Average console sale last year .... $67 

(McGraw-Hill figure) 

AVERAGE RCA VICTOR CONSOLE SALE $102 

Look at that increase of $35! That's 52%! That's 
the extra money that RCA Victor dealers took in 
against the general average of the field. Nothing 
produced this result but pioneering, plus aggres- 



sive sales and advertising methods to make the 
public conscious of the facts. 

Thus RCA has grown to leadership in the 
fine set field, dispelling forever the thought that 
there is money in cheapness. This year, there is no 
doubt we shall again far outstrip the industry, 
get more money for a quality product, make more 
money for our dealers. Pioneering pays. It pays 
us, it pays you, it pays the public. If you want to 
make real money in radio, feature RCA Victor! 



WHAT DEALERS SAY 



We were pleased to receive, in the 
form of advertising literature, sta- 
tistics showing that last year RCA 
Victor consoles eclipsed the aver- 
ige console unit sale by 52%. We 
were greatly surprised at this figure 
due to the fact that our average RCA 
Victor console price averages far 
«bovethe$102.00 which you men- 
tioned. We have every reason to 
believe on these 1936 models, that 
our average console sale will be 
much greater than last year. — 
Lauter's, Newark, N. J. 



For the past twelve months our 
Radio Department has enjoyed rhe 
most profitable business than for 
any like period since 1929. We at- 
tribute this to the fact that the public 
is generally demanding radio mer- 
chandiseof quality .The RCAVictor 
"Magic Brain" line introduced last 
Fall has played an important part in 
building higher unit sales in our 
department/The 1935 RCA Victor 
line willcarry our sales to anew high 
this season.— Sctuggs.Vandervoort 
& Barney, St. Louis, Mo. 





U 



The 

MAGIC 
EYE" 



The "Magic Eye" joins the "Magic 
Brain" and with RCA Metal Tubes 
gives the trade its great triple part- 
nership of sales features for 1936, 
proving once more that IT PAYS 
TO PIONEER. 



SEE THIS LIST OF RCA PIONEER ACHIEVEMENTS, 
EVERY ONE OF WHICH WORKS TO YOUR BENEFIT: 



Already a great leader— RCAVictor 
C13-2, giving you the "Magic Eye", 
the "Magic Brain", and RCA Metal 
Tubes in a handsome console for 
only $189.50 list! A terrific value 
with its three sure-fire features, its 
12-inch speaker.its 5 bands tuning to 
140-410 and 540-60,000 kilocycles! 
All prices f. o. b. Camden, N. J-, 
subject to change without notice. 



First practical superheterodyne for home 

use. 
First power-operated dynamic-type loud 

speaker for the home. 
First tubes and radio powered from the 

light socket. 
First cathode-ray tuning indicator, the 

"Magic Eye". 



First unit known as the "Magic Brain". 

Network broadcasting. 

Commercial inter-continental short-wave 

communication. 
Marine radio. 

World-wide radio communication. 
And many others. 



VICTOR 

RCA Manufacturing Co., Inc. • Camden, New Jersey 

„. T .«~ n, AMERICA TUB WORLDS LARGEST RADIO ORGANIZATION. OTHER UNITS, NATIONAL 

A SUBSIDIARY OF RADIO CO * P °** T ' COMMUNICATIONS. INC RCA BADIOTRON . . . RADIOMARINB COBPORATION OF AMERICA 

BROADCASTING CO.. INC. . . . R. C. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



The ivar against radio 

(Continued from page 11) 

point out, however, is the rate of mor- 
tality 31110115 these advertisers — the 
number who have failed and are no 
longer in a position to advertise in 
anything, anywhere; nor did they 
point out how many newspaper adver- 
tisers have similarly dropped out of 
newspapers in the same period of 
time. Those figures were suppressed, 
which can only lead to the conclusion 
that the figures are even worse if 
taken for the newspapers. 

Included in their figures also were 
scores of small and unimportant ad- 
vertisers who are no longer able to 
afford advertising of any nature; plus 
the large number of political and re- 
ligious broadcasts, paid for in 1928, 
but now going on as sustaining pro- 
grams. A.N.P.A. also conveniently 
"forgot" to mention that practically 
all available network time is now 
taken up by advertisers who did find 
radio broadcasting so successful as 
to warrant greatly increased time and 
expenditures. 

As an indication of the erroneous 
presentation apparent throughout 
this supposedly authoritative bit of 
propaganda, A.N.P.A. picked a basic 
figure for the number of homes in the 
United States that is easily 2,000,000 
wrong. Number of homes they esti- 
mate as 32,500,000, while everybody 
else including the Department of 
Commerce can find only 30,800,000. 

Costs money 

Groping for the few figures that 
might somehow be twisted to its ad- 
vantage, the folder announces blandly 
that it had studied 79 programs (out 
of the thousands on the air) and 
found that the average cost to the ad- 
vertiser to reach a million listeners is 
$7,302. 

Suspicious silence on the equivalent 
cost of newspaper advertising leaves 
it to us to point out (from the news- 
papers' own trade journal, Editor and 
Publisher) that the newspaper cost of 
reaching a million circulation ranges 
from $12,000 to $23,000; and what's 
more, the true figure for radio net- 
work advertising, according to both 
CBS and NBC actual figures, is be- 
tween $1,660 and $2,410 per million 
listeners — just about 10 per cent of 
newspaper costs. 

More hooey visible in the news- 
papers' campaign is the statement 
that "20 per cent of sets outstanding 
are unable to properly receive a radio 
message." How about it, service men 
and dealers? Is that true? Repeated 
accurate and authentic investigations 



by leading radio groups reveal this 
figure of sets out of order as no more 
than 4 per cent at any time. 

Vague and mysterious about the 
source of the figures, the pamphlet 
brightly exclaims that an average of 
only 36.4 per cent of the homes with 
radio sets have their sets turned on 
at any given time during the evening. 
So? Well, again, unprejudiced and 
impartial research organizations — 
carrying on their work — not in one 
town for a few weeks, but all over 
the United States constantly for a 
period of years — find this figure for 
"sets turned on" to average no less 
than 65%. 

The "loiv-down" 

Another point newspapers fail to 
state is the amazingly large number 
of newspaper readers who do not read 
the ads; and the fact that 90% of 
the newspapers of America are located 
in cities and towns, while radio serves 
every market — rural as well as 
urban. 

Now that we have absorbed the 
propaganda, let's take a look at the 
FACTS— 

During the same period of years 
"analyzed" by the A.N.P.A. (1928- 
1934), RADIO NETWORK AD- 
VERTISING- INCREASED 416% 
WHILE NATIONAL NEWS- 
PAPER ADVERTISING DE- 
CLINED 29%. 

In 1928, national newspaper adver- 
tising totalled $230,000,000. By 1934, 
this figure had receded to $163,- 
000,000. 

In 1928, radio network advertising 
totalled $10,250,000. By 1934, this 
figure had mounted to $42,659,000. 

So far as total dollar volume is 
concerned, national newspaper adver- 
tising is still far ahead of radio net- 
work advertising, and will continue 
to be so; there is a limit to the time 
on the air available for advertising- 
revenue. 

But so far as young, vigorous, 
healthy growth is concerned, we'll let 
you draw your own conclusions. 

And here are more facts to clarify 
the distorted picture of radio which 
the newspapers would like to have the 
public believe: 

One of the largest national net- 
works reports that 80% of all its ad- 
vertisers on the air in 1934 were re- 
newals from previous years; 97% of 
its gross revenue in 1934 came from 
advertisers who were on the air in 
previous years. 

There we have a recoi'd of loyalty 
to an advertising medium, and a sat- 
isfaction with the results obtained 
that all the newspapers in the United 



States of America put together could 
never hope to equal. 

Vet "radio is failing as an adver- 
tising medium," they say to adver- 
tisers who have made millions of dol- 
lars through radio advertising. "Radio 
should not broadcast news," they also 
declare — with as little logic as radio 
could say to the newspapers that they 
should not publish cartoons, comic 
supplements or other strictly enter- 
tainment features. 

Radio needs to present a united 
front against this attack by the news- 
paper interests who have disclosed 
themselves definitely as enemies. 

Radio programs sponsored by na-^ 
tional advertisers are the ones to 
which the public listens with the ut- 
most pleasure and consistency. They 
are the ones to which receivers are 
turned week after week. If the news- 
papers are successful in their at- 
tempts to drag these programs from 
the air and devote those expenditures 
to newspaper advertising, broadcast- 
ers might as well rip down their sta- 
tions and the rest of the radio indus- 
try shut up shop and factory. 

So, if the- newspapers want to blast 
radio right off the map as a medium 
of advertising and entertainment, 
okay boys, go to it. If there's going 
to be a battle, let's make it a good 
one. 

If such a battle will speed the day 
when radio will broadcast full news 
services; if it will speed the day 
when the radio trade will have "radio 
facsimile"' sets to make and sell, 
bringing new sales and profits to man- 
ufacturers and dealers, and new ave- 
nues of public service to broadcast- 
ers, let's have it. Ves, sir, if a battle 
will hasten all those events, boy, 
we're for it ! 

You're in it, too 

But remember this isn't a battle in- 
volving just the broadcasters alone. 
Every man and woman who derives 
his or her income from radio is in 
this scrap, too. Receiver manufac- 
turers (who last year spent $5,500,000 
advertising in newspapers) ; radio 
dealers (whose home-town advertising 
bills totalled another $5,300,000) ; 
distributors, service men — are all 
part of radio's storm battalions. In 
public opinion, influence on legisla- 
tion, business and personal expendi- 
tures, they exert a mighty wallop. 
And their hats are in the ring. 

From any such struggle — if the 
newspapers insist on heading into it 
— there can be only one outcome. 
Public opinion, radio-industry influ- 
ence and power, and sweeping techni- 
cal advances, all point to a clear-cut 
victory for radio! 



30 



Radio Today 



the HEUI in RnDio • nno HLL that is Heuj \ 





THE 
CROSLEY FIVER 

Table and Console 




CHASSIS— Five-lul>e super- 
heterodyne. Two bands — Standard 
and police, amateur, aviation broad- 
casts. Illuminated full-vision air- 
plane type dial — 5 to 1 ratio drive. 
Tone control. New 6B5 Triple-Twin 
output tube. Full floating moving 
coil electro-dynamic speaker. 

CABINETS— Half an eye can see 

their beauty and charm — equal in 
every way to their superb tone. Be- 
tween these and the Constitution 
models are a full range of receivers 
for every purse and type of use. 



From the Fiver, giving standard, 
police, aviation, amateur reception 
for S19.99 to the CONSTITUTION 
five-band metal tube all-wave that 
gets virtually all that's on the air . . . 
the neiv Crosley 1936 Line leads the 
field. In every price range the Cros- 
ley gives more for the money in 
beauty, performance, selectivity . . . 
in everything that makes for radio 
satisfaction. 



EATURES! Innovations! Master- 
strokes of engineering. In this new 
1936 radio line Crosley has tapped all 
the resources of experience dating back 
to the pioneering stage; all the creative- 
ness and inventiveness of today. Never 
has a line so stepped out to capture the 
imagination of a country. Never a line 
with so many 'Vant-able" features. 
Never a line with equal value for the 
radio dollar. 

The beauty of the line is alone an eye-stopper 
anywhere. But the more you explain the in- 
built quality, the new features, the reason for 
the extraordinary tone, selectivity, truthfulness 
of reproduction . . . the more your customers 
will select — from this line — the set that best, fits 
their means and their wants. 
Everywhere the groundwork of SALES is 
being laid with this line. Get in on this from 
the start by getting in touch with your Crosley 
distributor. 

THE CROSLEY RADIO CORPORATION 

CINCINNATI POWEL CROSLEY, Jr.. President 

Home of "the Notion's Station"— WLW— 500.000 watts 

— most powerful in the world — 70 on your dial. 

Prices in Florida, Rorky Mountain States 
and West slightly higher. 




THE 

CROSLEY CONSTITUTION 

Table and Console 




AMONG THE FEATURES... 

Three-gang tuning condenser with many notable improvements. 

New velvet action two-speed dial — planetary ball-bearing drive. 

New high-wattage, metal-to-metal tone control — far superior 

to conventional tone control. 

New triple-tuned I. F. transformer — far better selectivity, higher fidelity. 

New H-Q-4-layer bank wound Litzendraht broadcast coils — providing 

better signal-to-noise ratio. 

All-metal tube and all-glass tube models — a set for every need. 

NEW SHADOW TUNING. NEW 5-COLOR AIRPLANE DIAL 

NEW COLOR-BAND DESIGNATION. 



CHASSIS 

This all-wave 10-tube superhetero- 
dyne using all-metal lubes, com- 
mands the air. Five bands, receiving 
American, foreign, weather, amateur, 
police, aviation broadcasts. Shadow 
tuning. Automatic volume control. 
Full-visi<>n airplane type dial. Tone 
control. Dual ratio tuning control. 
Full floating moving coil electro- 
dynamic speaker. 




Wte 




WITH 




September, 1935 



31 



SELLING RECORDS 



* FOR the past few years the 
record industry has entered the Fall 
season with optimism, confidence 
and faith. Sometimes the optimism 
has materialized into sales, while in 
other years the volume has been dis- 
appointing. 

This year, however, there is more 
than merely a feeling of optimism 
and faith in prognosticating record 
sales for the remainder of the year. 
For, strange as it may seem, the rec- 
ord industry this year went contrary 
to all precedents, and sales during 
the summer compared very favorably 
with the winter and fall sales volume 
of only a few years ago. 

Record sales are increasing, not 
like a sky-rocket, maybe, but going 
up just the same. This is true of 
all types of music. And for the first 
time in quite a while, there is a defi- 
nite upward trend in the demand for 
the better class of music. 



Victor Library of 
Recorded Music 

• OUTSTANDING as an artis- 
tic achievement, as well as a mer- 
chandising feat in records, is RCA's 
new Victor Library of Recorded Mu- 
sic, undoubtedly the most luxurious 
collection of recorded music ever to 
come from the work of great artists. 
The taste which governed the selec- 
tion of its 461 records is commanding 
and profound ; the set makes a real 
bid for the title of the musical an- 
thology of all time. 

The new Library will be marketed 
this Fall — 94 richly-bound volumes 
presented in a specially designed 
cabinet, along with a cunning index 
system which instantly locates rec- 
ords. The makers of the Library 
thus emerge from what obviously has 
been a long, painstaking and intelli- 
gent search for genuine musical ex- 
cellence. The experts behind such a 
presentation have recognized the 
nameless advantage of choosing musi- 
cal units in their purest and grandest 
forms. 

The judges who selected the records 
for the Library include most of the 
critical genius of the country. The 
list includes Damrosch, Farrar, Hei- 
fetz, Rachmaninoff, Kreisler, Deems 
Taylor, Whiteman, and others. Their 
mission was to pick the music which 
meant the most to a knowing listener 



— their final list is more than no- 
table — it is extraordinary. 

The key symphonies of musical 
history, concertos, and the finest solo 
instrumental works form the nucleus 
of the collection, and yet there is a 
discriminating attitude toward jazz, 
folk-songs, and "heart-songs" both 
modern and classic. The acknowledged 
operatic high-spots are included and 
all instruments are represented. In 
the attempt to give the set a basic 
educational quality, the judges were 
still able to select only the accepted 
masterpieces. The feat will be re- 
membered as one of sheer discern- 
ment. 

Actually, the Library includes 13 
symphony orchestras, 37 famous vo- 
calists, 9 leading concert pianists, 2 
great opera companies, 4 violinists, 
2 organists, 13 of the best dance or- 
chestras, and many other epic selec- 
tions. Deems Taylor has said that 
"anyone owning this collection has 
at his command a source of endless 
pleasure and diversion, to say noth- 
ing of a complete musical education." 

The amazing range of the Library 
runs from solemn recordings of "Old 

(Please turn to page 34) 



Best sellers as we 
go to press 

BRUNSWICK 

Cheek to Cheek — Fox trot. No Strings 
— Fox trot. (Both from "Top Hat"). 
Vocal and tap dancing by Fred Astaire 
with Leo Reisman and his Orchestra — 
7486. 

Isn't This a Lovely Day? — Fox trot. 
Top Hat, White Tie and Tails — Fox 

trot. (Both from "Top Hat"). Vocal 
and tap dancing by Fred Astaire with 
Johnny Green and his Orchestra — 74S7. 

The Plecolino — Fox trot. (From "Top 
Hat"). Vocal by Fred Astaire with 
Leo Reisman and his Orchestra. 
Toddlin' Along with You — Fox trot. 
(From "Broadway Joe"). Leo Reisman 
and his Orchestra with vocal by Frank 
Luther — 74S8. 



Rhythm Is Our Business — Fox trot. 

Star Dust — Fox trot. Jimmie Lunce- 
ford and his Orchestra — 369. 

Sugar Blues — Fox trot. Tear It Down 
— Fox trot. Clyde McCoy and his Or- 
chestra — 381. 



East of the Sun- 
Some — Fox trot. 
Orchestra — 502. 



-Fox trot. And Then 
Bob Crosby and his 



VICTOR 

I'm Gonna Sit Right Down and Write 
Myself a Letter — Fox trot. You've 
Been Taking Lessons in Love — Fox 

trot. "Fats" Waller and his Rhythm — 
25044. 

Let's Swing It — Fox trot. (From Earl 
Carroll's "Sketch Book of 1935"). 
Chinatown, My Chinatown — Fox trot. 
Ray Noble and his Orchestra — 25070. 

12th Street Rag — Fox trot. Sweet Sue 
— Fox trot. "Fats" Waller and his 
Rhythm — 25087. 




RCA's sensational new Victor Recording Library, containing a distinguished 
collection of nearly 500 musical masterpieces 



32 



Radio Today 



51% Sales Increase 

in Victor Red Seal Records 



i& 






=tev^w 






-Cue;. 

5TOKOW5KI 

marveled! 

»nd ( hc piogress of VI™,, d ^ 
oon Leopold Stotowiki N on L Kccotdmg 
'"gin the making of a rec T " """^ '""' 

' h «"i the «,. Phil.dclnl,,, n..L h " 



worlds P" 31 "* 

L ~ ,t is, "^ j. „« Victor 

Vet here * ,s - ^peib M» Y 

«pf» <"*""■ „, ui s,.ely »** 

.„ iB wax, 6 "" "1 vctvU .d^V»n- 

teAoaia is "P*" ■ j hJJt» 

„„ t th,s 0*8^ °^, ecotds.sU 

A4 „ fc«r «to: ^ 



TSCHAIKOWSKYS FIFTH 
dctighrcd and untied. For lit 

«ms c.aggcration, we invite vo„ r„ 
■ I »criiW, be, u ,,f„, ,„,,,, JJJJO 
ay w your dealer's. 



PARSIFAL, ACT III 
<4 Sympfmnir c^-.t..i_ 



J"*-*^ 






■I "" ril »»'< 



*"* her,. '?*~~ th *t nn ~~ 2 " d l0 cA ,, " ^"^ 
Pro, ^ °' (/le „ * s '"Xle . P"°n a 

•W^Cf"' 6 ""' -o„^ **?"" 






RECORDS 

CA V.™,, n. 









Cash in on the 

rising demand 

for these fine 

recordings 



Shown above are three ofthe rei 
ppearing In 5 National Maca 



dvertisements on Red Seal Records 
and 23 Metropolitan Newspapers 



Oales of Victor Red Seal Records increased 
51% in 1934 over the previous year. The increase 
in sales of Masterworks' during the last three 
months of last year was 154%! And in January and 
February of this year. Red Seal Records showed an 
increase of 68.2% over the same month last year! 

Why these increases? Many things. Victor's 
unquestioned command of the great American 
orchestras, such as Leopold Stokowski and the 
Philadelphia Orchestra; the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra under the direction of Serge Kousse- 
vitzky ; the Minneapolis Symphony with Eugene 
Ormandy conducting. Victor's brilliant achieve- 
ment in Higher Fidelity recording. Finally, an 
aggressive promotional and advertising campaign. 
All these make a sure-fire winning combination. 

Look at those figures and maich them against 
your own sales. Dealers made good money in Red 
Seal Records last year, and a lot more money is 
being made selling them this year. Get on the Red 
Seal bandwagon — it is leading the procession. 
RCA Manufacturing Co., Inc., RCA Victor 
Division, Camden, N. J. 




VICT 



IT PAYS TO SELL 




RCA Victor, a unit ofRadio Cor- 
poration of America .. the 
world's largest radio organiza- 
tion Other units: National 
Broadcasting Co., Inc. . R. C. A. 

Communications. Inc RCA 

Radiotron . . . Radiomarine Cor- 



atio 



RECORDS 



THEY'RE HIGHER FIDELITY 



of An 



September, 1935 



33 




No. 33 
(Needle Ballast) 
Listed at $24.50 



rt The standard 

by -which others are 

judged and valued" 



AUDAX 



AN leading 
Radio Stations, 
Laboratories and 
Universities — 
wherever super- 
lative pick-up 
performance is 
demanded — 
today you find 
AUDAX doing 
duty. Engineered 
to the ttth power, 
immune to summer 
heat, humidity 
and other climatic 
conditions. Made 
to suit every de- 
mand from the 
humblest midget- 
combinations to the 
HIGH FIDELITY 
requirements of 
fine transcriptions. 
What is your 
pick-up problem? 

List prices $9- 50 to $390 00 
Special Recording Heads to Order 

A I DAK COMPANY 
500 Fifth Ave., Bfew York 

"Creators oj High Grade Electrical 
and Acoustical Apparatus Since 1915" 




Kentucky Home" and "Annie Laurie" 
to the wondrous reproductions of 
Bach's most intricate concertos. 
Galli-Curci, McCormack, S c h i p a , 
Ponselle, Jeritza, Bori, Caruso. 
Paderewski, and dozens of such 
artists are well represented. 

Sponsors of the new Library have 
presented it as "a collection that is 
to the modern music lover what Dr. 
Eliot's Five-Foot Book Shelf is to 
the booklover." It will be merchan- 
dised along with the new model radio- 
phonograph, with 22 all-metal tubes 
and other new features. Early an- 
nouncements of the Library have al- 
ready netted its sponsors several 
hundred advance orders. The retail 
price of the Library is $950. 

Interest in record sales 

The retailers as a whole would 
like to see the record manufacturers, 
as well as the manufacturers of radio- 
phonograph combinations, feature 
records in their advertising to a far 
greater degree than has been evident. 
Some of the dealers maintain that in 
their respective localities there is a 
popular notion that the talking ma- 
chine is as dead as the Ford Model 
T, and they feel that something- 
should be done about it. This problem, 
of course, is perennial and applies to 
other industries as well as the record 
Held. 

One prominent executive of a job- 
bing organization maintains that 
there are not a sufficient number of 
dealers selling records at this time to 
give the public an adequate idea of 
the music that lies hidden in the 
record library. He points out that 
every day five or six calls are received 
from music lovers in his territory 
asking where they can purchase cer- 
tain records which they need for their 
libraries. On the other hand, several 
pioneers in the record industry be- 
lieve that the dealers who are mer- 
chandising records at the present 
time should apply more intensive 
selling methods, thereby getting their 
share of the record sales possibilities 
in their localities and building up a 
volume that will bring substantial 
profits. Such intensive merchandis- 
ing would eliminate the necessity of 
spotting the dealers so close to each 
other that the sales volume for 
the individual dealers would be less- 
ened. Tbis theory undoubtedly carries 
more weight in the sale of the better 
class of music and the higher priced 
popular records than it does in the 
lower priced record field. 

In preparing for the coming fall 
season, retailers who are not handling 




Dancer Astaire, Brunswick Star 

records at the present time will un- 
doubtedly find it advantageous to 
look around their establishments and 
try to find available floor space that 
could be used for a display of rec- 
ords which would not necessarily in- 
volve the expenditure of a great deal 
of money. The three leading record 
manufacturers have perfected far 
reaching sales plans for the imme- 
diate future. 



"BETTER RADIO RECEPTION" 
BROADCASTS 

Next broadcast, WABC and Colum- 
bia network, Saturday, Sept. 28, 
8:30 p.m., E.D.T., Dr. Orestes 
Caldwell, Editor "Radio Today" 

* Continuing Radio To- 
day's series of broadcast demonstra- 
tions designed to instruct listeners in 
obtaining better reception through 
tube replacements, proper antennas, 
quality receivers, and competent ser- 
vicing, the next broadcast will be 
given at the invitation of the Colum- 
bia Broadcasting System as above, 
under the title: "How to Make Your 
Radio Set Behave Better." 

Previous network demonstrations 
have been given by Editor Caldwell 
over WEAF and NBC Red network, 
Sept. 6, "Getting Your Radio Ready 
for Fall," and over WJZ and NBC 
Blue network, Sept. 9, "Tuning Up 
Your Radio for the Big Broadcasts 
Ahead." 



34 



Radio Today 



Gh&j STEWART-WARNER BRIN6S YOU THE 
TWO GREATEST ADVANCES IN RADIO - 



-"- . 




11-tube Ferrodyne Round - the -World 

receiver with metal -tube equipment, 

automatic station register, arid new 

improved Diffusalite Magic Dial, 




9 -tube Ferrodyne Round -the -World 

receiver with metal -tube equipment, 

automatic station register and new 

Diffusalite Magic Dial. 



• Stewart -Warner alone gives you radio's 
most sensational achievements . . . the metal 
tube and Ferrodyne. The Ferrodyne Chassis 
is an exclusive Stewart -Warner develop- 
ment, created especially for the all-metal 
tube ... to get the utmost from every ad- 
vantage the new tubes bring to radio! 

Now we know you've heard plenty of sets, 
and some mighty good ones. We know 
you're inclined to be skeptical. But here's 
our proposition. Look at the new Ferrodyne. 
Listen to it. We'll leave it to your own good 
judgment: Isn't the Stewart-Warner Fer- 
rodyne as fine a set as you've ever heard? 
That's proof enough, isn't it? We're will- 
ing to stake everything on your opinion! 

Then — after you've heard this amazing new 
all-metal tube set, look into the unusual 
merchandising program Stewart -Warner 
has set up to help you sell. It's a sound 
plan. It's backed by sound selling ideas . . . 
newspaper advertising . . . and something 
new: your otvn local radio program with 
big-time talent! You'll find the Stewart- 
Warner story interesting, out-of-the- ordi- 
nary. Write, wire or phone today — we'll 
give you full details in a hurry! 

STEWART -WARNER CORPORATION 

Chicago, Illinois 

STEWART 
WARNER 

,H£ RADIO 



<y£ftW^ 



ied 



September, 1935 



35 



RADIO RECEIVERS FOR 1935-36 



Compiled by Radio Today 



Model 
Number 



Retail Price 
Complete 



Kilocycle 
Range 



Power 
Supply 



Number 
of Tubes 



Ansley Radio Corp., 240 West 23rd St., New York City 
D-l $69.50 Port. Phonograph AC-DC 4g. 

D-6 49.50 Table 550-1600 AC-DC 5g. 

D-9 79.50 Port. 550*15000 AC-DC 6g. 

D-10 84.50 Table 550*15000 AC-DC 6g. 

Models D-9 and D-10 with metal-glass tubes— S5.00 additional 



Atwater Kent Mfg. C 


o., Philadelphia 


Penna. 






184 




Table 


540-1712 


AC 


4g. 


237Q 




Table 


540-18000 


6v.DC 


7g. 


285Q 




Cons. 


540-1712 


Batt. 


5g. 


305Z 




Table 


540*16000 


32v.DC 


5g. 


317 




Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


7m. 


328 




Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


8m. 


337 




Table 


540-18000 


AC 


7m 


412 




Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


12c. 


415Q 




Table 


540-1712 


Batt. 


5g. 


435 




Cons. 


540*7500 


AC 


5c. 


467Q 




Cons. 


540-18000 


6v.DC 


7g. 


509 


Tune-o-matic 


540*15500 


AC 


9g. 


545 




Table 


540*7500 


AC 


5g. 


565Z 




Cons. 


540*16000 


32v.DC 


5g. 


649 




Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


9m. 


776 




Auto 


540-1500 


6v.DC 


6g. 


810 




Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


10c. 


856 




Table 


540-18000 


AC 


6m. 


976 




Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


6m. 


Belmont Radio Corp 


, 1257 Fullerton Ave., Chicago, 


III. 




401M 


$22.50 


Table 


540-1720 


AC 


4m. 


404 


39.50t 


Table 


540-1720 


Batt. 


4g. 


540 


25.00 


Table 


530-1720 


AC-DC 


5g. 


580 


39.50 


Auto 


520-1550 


6v.DC 


5g. 


585 


37.50 


Table 


530*19000 


AC 


5m. 


680 


44.50 


Auto 


520-1550 


6v.DC 


6g. 


690 


49.50 


Auto 


520-1550 


6v.DC 


6g. 


777-L 


74.50 


Cons. 


525-19100 


AC 


7m. 


777-T 


49. 95 


Table 


525-19100 


AC 


7m. 


880 


64.50 


Auto 


520-1550 


6v.DC 


8g. 


1077 


94.50 


Cons. 


525-19100 


AC 


10m. 


The Capehart Corp., 


Fort Wayne, Indiana 






202 


$ 595.00 


Cons. 


150-18000 


AC 


9m. 


302-D 


795. 00 


Cons. 


150-20000 


AC 


17c. 


404-D 


1095.00 


Cons. 


150-20000 


AC 


21c. 


404-DR 


1445.00 


Cons. 


150-20000 


AC 


21c. 


405-D 


1065.00 


Cons. 


150-20000 


AC 


21c. 


405-DR 


1415.00 


Cons. 


150-20000 


AC 


21c. 


406-D 


995.00 


Cons. 


150-20000 


AC 


21c. 


406-DR 


1345. 00 


Cons. 


150-20000 


AC 


21c. 


Case Electric Corp., 1307 So. We!ls St., Chicago, 111. 






700 




Table 


All-wave 


AC 


7 


701 




Cons. 


All-wave 


AC 


7 


1001 




Cons. 


All-wave 


AC 


10 


1003 




Cons. 


All-wave 


AC 


10 


Crosley Radio Corp., 


Cincinnati, Ohio 






A145 


$ 36.95 


Auto 


535-1750 


6v.DC 


5g. 


A155 


47.50 


Auto 


535-1750 


6v.DC 


6g. 


415-AA 


19.99** 


Table 


535-1750 


Batt. 


4g. 


425-H 


25.00 


Table 


535-1750 


AC-DC 


4g. 


505-MK 


44.50 


Cons. 


535-4000 


AC 


5g. 


515-AC 


19.99 


Table 


535-4000 


AC 


5g. 


525-B 


29.95 


Table 


535-4000 


AC 


5g. 


545-AD 


25.00 


Table 


535-1750 


AC-DC 


5g. 


555-KC 


29.95** 


Table 


535-1750 


Batt. 


5g. 


555-SA 


49. 95** 


Cons. 


535-1750 


Batt. 


5g. 


615-C 


47.50 


Table 


535-15500 


AC-DC 


6g. 


615-M 


59.50 


Cons. 


535-15500 


AC-DC 


6g. 


625-E 


69.50 


Table 


535-15500 


6v.DC 


6g. 


625-NB 


84.50 


Cons. 


535-15500 


6v.DC 


6g. 


635-C 


39.95 


Table 


535-15500 


AC 


6g. 


635-M 


54.50 


Cons. 


535-15500 


AC 


6g. 


645-CB 


47.50 


Table 


535-4000 


32v.DC 


6g. 


645-MB 


64.50 


Cons. 


535-4000 


32v.DC 


6g. 


655-C 


45.00 


Table 


535-15500 


AC 


6m. 


655-M 


59.95 


Cons. 


535-15500 


AC 


6m. 


715-D 


55.00 


Table 


535-15500 


AC 


7g. 


715-N 


69.95 


Cons. 


535-15500 


AC 


7g. 


815-EC 


59.95** 


Table 


535*15500 


Batt. 


8g. 


815-NC 


74. 50** 


Cons. 


535*15500 


Batt. 


8g. 


855-D 


65.00 


Table 


535-15500 


AC 


8m 


R55 N 


79.95 


Cons. 


535-15500 


AC 


8m. 


725-F 


65.00 


Table 


150*22000 


AC 


7g. 


725-P 


85.00 


Cons. 


150*22000 


AC 


7g. 


865-F 


77.50 


Table 


150*22000 


AC 


8m. 


865-P 


97. 50 


Cons. 


150*22000 


AC 


8m 


915-EK 


85.00 


Table 


150*22000 


AC 


8g. 


915-RA 


100. 00 


Cons. 


150*22000 


AC 


8g. 


1055-EK 


99.95 


Table 


150*22000 


AC 


10m 


1055-EK 


115.00 


Cons. 


150*22000 


AC 


10m 



c. indicates combination of metal tubes and glass tubes in receiver 
g. indicates glass tubes in receiver 
m. indicates metal tubes in receiver 
mg. indicates metal-glass tubes in receiver 

* in kilocycle range indicates not continuous range between limits indicated 
** less batteries 
t includes batteries. 



Model Retail Price Kilocycle 

Number Complete Cabinet Range 



Power 
Supply 



Number 
of Tubes 



Electrical Research Laboratories, 

Chicago, IU. 



Inc., (Erla), 2222 Diversey Pkway., 



11M 

14A72 

14A82 

19A68 

19A71 

20A71 

20A73 

25A72 

25A74 

31B72 

31B74 

32B69 

33B70 

33B71 

34B71 

34B73 

35B70 

35B72 

36L71 

36L73 



$44.95 
84.50 
69.95 
34.95 
59.95 
49.95 
29.95 
69.95 
49.95 
79. 95f 
59. 95f 
29. 95t 
39. 95f 
59.95 
69. 95t 
49.95f 
49. 95f 
69. 95f 
59.95 
39.95 



Auto 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Table 



540-1550 

540*18900 

540*18900 

540*18100 

540*18100 

540*6300 

540*6300 

540-18100 

540-18100 

535*18300 

535*18300 

540-1720 

540*6300 

540*6300 

540*6300 

540*6300 

540-18100 

540-18100 

540*6300 

540*6300 



6v.DC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

6v.DC 

6v.DC 

Batt. 

Batt. 

Batt. 

6v.DC 

6v.DC 

Batt. 

Batt. 

DC 

DC 



Emerson Radio & Phonograph Corp., Ill Eighth Ave., New York City 



1A 

5A 

6A. 

34-C 

34-F7 

36 

101 

101-F7 

101-U 

102 

102-LW 

103 

104 

104-LW 

105 

105-LW 

106 

107 

107-LW 

108 

108-LW 

109 

110 

110-LW 

111 

111-LW 



5 37.95 
49.95 
44.95 
44.95 
49.95 
19.95 
59.95 
69.95 
69.95 
89.95 
94.95 
34.95 
69.95 
74.95 
129.95 
134.95 
34.95 
44.95 
49.95 
24.95 
29.95 
14.95 
29.95 
34.95 
39.95 
44.95 



Auto 
Auto 
Auto 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 



545-1500 

545-1500 

545-1500 

540*16000 

540*16000 

540-3200 

540*16000 

540*16000 

540*16000 

540-19000 

135*19000 

540-3950 

540-19000 

135*19000 

540-19000 

135*19000 

530-4300 

540*16000 

135*16000 

530-4000 

150*1550 

540-1650 

530-4000 

150*1550 

540*16000 

135*16000 



6v.DC 

6v.DC 

6v.DC 

AC 

Batt. 

AC 

AC 

Batt. 

AC-DC 

AC 

AC 

Batt. 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 



5g. 

5g. 

6g. 

6c. 

7g. 

5g. 

6c. 

7g. 

6c. 

8c. 

8c. 

5g. 

8c. 

8c. 
lie. 
He. 

6c. 

6c. 

6c. 

5g. 

5g- 

4g. 

5g. 

5g. 

6c. 

6c. 



Fairbanks-Morse Home Appliances, Inc., 430 So. Green St., Chicago, 111. 



4015 

4115-B 

5416 

5445 

5619 

5645-A 

6317 

6346 

6416-B 

6445-B 

8218 

8247 

8248 

10049 

10050 



$ 24.95 
29.95** 
44.95 
59.95 
34.95 
49.95 
54.95 
77.50 
49. 95** 
69. 95** 
79.50 
99.50 
112.50 
150.00 
175.00 



Table 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Cons. 



540-1720 

540-1720 

540*18200 

540*18200 

540*7500 

540*7500 

540-18200 

540-18200 

540*16500 

540*16500 

140*18200 

140*18200 

140*18200 

140*18200 

140*18200 



AC 

Batt. 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

Batt. 

Batt. 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 



8g 

lOg 
lOg 



Freed Manufacturing Co., (Freed-Eisemann), 127 W. 17th St., New York 
City 



A342 

C-310AC 

E-341 

G-351-P 

H-357-P 

H-357-L 

Q-358-S 

R-369-S 

T-367-S 

T-368-P 

U-363 

V-360 

W-380 

W-382 



Table 
None 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 



550-1550 

550*20000 

550-1550 

550-3500 

550-3500 

550-3500 

550*15700 

550*15700 

550*15700 

550-3500 

550*20000 

550*20000 

550*20000 

550*20000 



AC-DC 

AC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC 

AC -DC 

AC 

AC 

AC-DC 

AC 



4g 
lOg 
4g. 
5g. 
5g 
5g. 
5g 
6g. 
6g. 
6g 
6g. 
6g. 



AC sets available with metal or glass tubes 
AC-DC sets available with combination of metal and glass. 



Galvin Mfg. Corp. (Motorola), 847 W. Harrison St., Chicago, 111. 



57 


$37.95 


Auto 


540-1550 


6v.DC 


75 


47.50 


Auto 


540-1550 


6v.DC 


100 


64.50 


Auto 


540-1550 


6v.DC 



36 



Radio Today 



Model 


Retail Price 




Kilocycle 


Power 


Number 


Model 


Retail Price 




Kilocycle 


Power 


Number 


Number 


Complete 


Cabinet 


Range 


Supply 


of Tubes 


Number 


Complete 


Cabinet 


Range 


Supply 


of Tubes 


General Electric Co., Bridgeport, Conn. 






Philco Radio & Television Corp., Philadelphia, Pa 


— (continued) 


A-53 


$ 34. 50 


Table 


540*6800 


AC 


5m. 


54C 


29.95 


Table 


540-3200 


AC-DC 


5g. 


A-63 


47.50 


Table 


540*16000 


AC 


6m. 


54S 


35.00 


Table 


540-3200 


AC-DC 


5g. 


A-65 


64.50 


Cons. 


540*16000 


AC 


6m. 


59C 


25.00 


Table 


540-1720 


AC 


4g. 


A-70 


74.50 


Table 


540-19500 


AC 


7m. 


59S 


29.95 


Table 


540-1720 


AC 


4g. 


A-75 


100.00 


Cons. 


540-19500 


AC 


7m. 


60B 


29.95 


Table 


540-4000 


AC 


5g. 


A-82 


94.50 


Table 


140*19500 


AC 


8m. 


60F 


42.50 


Cons. 


540-4000 


AC 


5g. 


A-87 


125.00 


Cons. 


140*19500 


AC 


8m. 


84B 


20.00 


Table 


540-1720 


AC 


4g. 


A-125 


185.00 


Cons. 


140*40000 


AC 


12m. 


89B 


39.50 


Table 


540-3200 


AC 


6g. 














89F 


50.00 


Cons. 


540-3200 


AC 


6g. 


General Household Utilities Co., 


(Grunow), Chicago, III. 




116B 
116X 


97.50 
175.00 


Table 
Cons. 


150-22500 
150-22500 


AC 
AC 


llg. 
Hg. 


470 


$ 22.50 


Table 


545-1720 


AC 


4g. 


610B 


39.95 


Table 


530*18000 


AC 


5g. 


520 


29.95 


Table 


545-1720 


AC-DC 


5g. 


610F 


49.95 


Cons. 


530*18000 


AC 


5g. 


580 


39.95 


Table 


545-18000 


AC 


5g. 


611B 


45.00 


Table 


530*18000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


581 


49.95 


Cons. 


545-18000 


AC 


5g. 


61 IF 


57.50 


Cons. 


530*18000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


620 


59.50 


Table 


545-18000 


6v.DC 


6g. 


620B 


49.95 


Table 


540-18000 


AC 


6g. 


621 


79.50 


Cons. 


545-18000 


6v.DC 


6g. 


620F 


65.00 


Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


6g. 


640 


49.95 


Table 


545-18000 


AC 


6g. 


623B 


59. 95f 


Table 


530*18000 


Batt. 


6g. 


641 


59.95 


Cons. 


545-18000 


AC 


6g. 


623F 


75.00t 


Cons. 


530*18000 


Batt. 


6g. 


680 


59.50 


Table 


545-18000 


AC 


6m. 


630B 


59.95 


Table 


540-18000 


AC 


6g. 


681 


69.50 


Cons. 


545-18000 


AC 


6m. 


630CSX 


79.50 


Spec. 


540-18000 


AC 


6g. 


720 


49.50 


Table 


545-18000 


Batt. 


7g. 


630X 


75.00 


Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


6g. 


721 


59.50 


Cons. 


545-18000 


Batt. 


7g. 


640B 


69.50 


Table 


145*18000 


AC 


7g. 


761 


87.50 


Cons. 


150*18000 


AC 


7m. 


640X 


89.50 


Cons. 


145*18000 


AC 


7g. 


871 


99.50 


Cons. 


150*18000 


AC 


8m. 


641B 


75.00 


Table 


530*18000 


DC 


7g. 


1171 


137. 50 


Cons. 


150*18000 


AC 


11m. 


641X 


100.00 


Cons. 


530*18000 


DC 


7g. 


1241 


167.50 


Cons. 


150*18000 


AC 


12m. 


643B 


79. 50t 


Table 


150*18000 


Batt. 


7g. 














643X 


100. oot 


Cons. 


150*18000 


Batt. 


7g. 


Halson Radio Mfg. Corp 


., 120 East 16th St., New York City 




650B 
650H 


79.50 
125.00 


Table 
Spec. 


145*18000 
145*18000 


AC 
AC 


8g. 
8g. 


4M 


$ 9.95 


Table 


545-1580 


AC-DC 


4g. 


650MX 


125.00 


Cons. 


145*18000 


AC 


8g. 


18M 


59.50 


Table 


545-18800 


AC 


8m. 


650PX 


175.00 


Cons. 


145*18000 


AC 


8g. 


50M 


19.95 


Table 


545-4000 


AC-DC 


6c. 


650RX 


137.50 


Spec. 


145*18000 


AC 


8g. 


AW6 


29.50 


Table 


545-18800 


AC-DC 


6g. 


650X 


100.00 


Cons. 


145*18000 


AC 


8g. 


CA5 


34.95 


Cons. 


545-18800 


AC-DC 


6g. 


660L 


150.00 


Spec 


145*18000 


AC 


10g. 


CA8 


69.50 


Cons. 


545-18800 


AC-DC 


8g. 


660X 


137.50 


Cons. 


145*18000 


AC 


10g. 


CM5 


34.95 


Cons. 


545-18800 


AC 


5m. 


680X 


250.00 


Cons. 


150*22000 


AC 


15g. 


CM8 


69.50 


Cons. 


545-18800 


AC 


8m. 


805 


42.95 


Auto 


550-1600 


6v.DC 


5g. 


MA8 


59.50 


Table 


545-18800 


AC-DC 


8g. 


806 


49.95 


Auto 


550-1600 


6v.DC 


6g. 


MA53 


29.50 


Table 


545-18800 


AC 


5m. 


807 


59.95 


Auto 


550-1600 


6v.DC 


7g. 


MA63 


34.95 


Table 


545-18800 


AC 


6m. 


808 


75.00 


Auto 


550-1600 


6v.DC 


7g. 


MG5 


14.95 


Table 


545-1580 


AC-DC 


4m. 


809 


59.95 


Auto 


550-1600 


6v.DC 


6g. 


Howard Radio Co., Belmont Ave., 


Chicago, 111. 






Pierce Airo (De Wald), 510 Sixth Ave 


, New York City 




47-U 


$ 17.95 


Table 


550-1700 


AC-DC 


4g. 


403A 


$17.95 


Table 


545-1700 


AC-DC 


4g. 


57-UA 


29.95 


Table 


550-4000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


50SR 


31.50 


Table 


535-1660 


AC-DC 


5g. 


67-T 


44.95 


Table 


550-16000 


AC 


6g. 


506R 


22.00 


Table 


545-4000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


67-C 


59.95 


Cons. 


550-16000 


AC 


6g. 


510B 


19.95 


Table 


535-1700 


AC 


5g. 


77-T 


64.50 


Table 


550-18000 


AC 


7m. 


605 


44.95 


Auto 


520-1500 


6v.DC 


6g. 


77-C 


79.50 


Cons. 


550-18000 


AC 


7m. 


606 


39.95 


Auto 


520-1500 


6v.DC 


6g. 


99-C 


124.50 


Cons. 


550-18000 


AC 


9m. 


609SA 


27.95 


Table 


545-4000 


AC-DC 


6c. 


Grand 


295.00 


Cons. 


150*18000 


AC 


19g. 


610SA 


44.95 


Table 


540-16700 


AC 


6c. 


HA -3 


37.50 


Auto 


550-1500 


6v.DC 


5g. 


610SC 


59.95 


Cons. 


540-16700 


AC 


6c. 


HA-4 


47.50 


Auto 


550-1500 


6v.DC 


6g. 


612SA 


33.00 


Table 


540-1700 


AC-DC 


6c. 














612SB 


31.50 


Table 


535-1660 


AC- DC 


6c. 


International Radio Corp., (Kadette), Ann Arbor, Mich. 




612SC 
805A 


44.95 
75.00 


Cons. 
Table 


540-1700 
140-18000 


AC-DC 
AC 


6c. 
8g. 


26 


$22.50 


Table 


540-1760 


AC 


4mg. 


805C 


95.00 


Cons. 


140-18000 


AC 


8g. 


41 


13.50 


Table 


550-1600 


AC-DC 


3g. 














43 

44 


16.50 
16.50 


Table 
Table 


550-1600 
550-1600 


AC-DC 
AC-DC 


3g. 
3g. 


Pilot Radio Corp., 37-06 Thirty-sixth St., Long Island City 




47 


16.50 


Table 


550-1600 


AC-DC 


3g. 


41 


$29.90 


Table 


545-1770 


AC 


g. 


48 


16.50 


Table 


550-1600 


AC-DC 


3g. 


43 


33.50 


Table 


545*18800 


AC 


g. 


52 


29.95 


Table 


540-18700 


AC 


5mg. 


123 


49.50 


Table 


545*18800 


AC- DC 


g. 


53 


37.50 


Table 


540-22500 


AC 


5mg. 


183 


49.90 


Table 


545*18800 


AC 


m. 


61 


39.95 


Table 


540-22500 


AC-DC 


6c. 


213 


69.90 


Table 


545-18800 


AC 


m. 


72 


32. 50** 


Table 


540-4000 


Batt. 


6g. 


303 


99.90 


Table 


530-23500 


AC 


m. 


120 


49.50 


Table 


540-22500 


AC 


7mg. 


CX-63 


89.50 


Cons. 


545-18800 


AC 


g. 


1200 


69.50 


Cons. 


540-22500 


AC 


7mg. 


CX-68 




Cons. 


545-18800 


DC 


g. 




Available 


with metal tubes at additional trice. 




CX-114 


149.50 


Cons. 


530-23500 


AC 


g. 














PX-63 


150.00 


Cons. 


545-18800 


AC 


g. 














PX-68 


165.00 


Cons. 


545-18800 


DC 


g 


Kingston Radio Co., Kokomo, Indiana 






PX-114 


395.00 


Cons. 


530-23500 


AC 


g. 


55 


S19.95 


Table 


550-1715 


AC-DC 


5g. 


X-63 
X-68 


67.50 
72.50 


Table 
Table 


545-18800 
545-18800 


AC 
DC 


g. 
g. 


500A 


34.95 


Table 


540*16700 


AC 


5g. 


X-73 


64.50 


Table 


545-18800 


Batt. 


g. 


600B 


49.95 


Cons. 


540-1765 


AC 


6g. 


X-114 


99.50 


Table 


530-23500 


AC 


g. 


610A 


37.95 


Table 


540-1765 


AC 


6g. 


103 


42.50 


Table 


545*18800 


AC 


g. 


700A 


54.95 


Table 


540*16700 


AC 


7g. 


108 


45.00 


Table 


545*18800 


DC 


g. 


700B 


64.95 


Cons. 


540*16700 


AC 


7g. 


























The Radolek Co., 601 W 


. Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 






Laurehk Radio Mfg. Co 


., Adrian, 


Mich. 






3F10926 


$29. 50 


Table 


555-1750 


AC-DC 


5g. 


AE-6 


$49.50 


Auto 


540-1600 


6v.DC 


6c. 


3F10927 


39.50 


Table 


550-17500 


AC 


6g. 


L-19 


34.50 


Table 


540-6000 


Batt. 


5g. 


3F10947 


39.50 


Table 


530-18700 


AC 


6m. 


L-32 


49.50 


Table 


540-6000 


32v.DC 


4m. 


3F10986 


37.50 


Table 


555-16700 


AC-DC 


6g. 


L-42 


34.50 


Table 


540-16000 


AC 


5m. 


4F10928 


37.50 


Table 


550-17500 


AC 


5g. 














4F10931 


21.50 


Table 


555-1750 


AC-DC 


4g. 














BF 10929 


35.00 


Table 


530-17500 


AC 


5g. 


Noblitt-Snarks Industries (Arvin 


), Columbus, Ind. 






BF10935 


59.50 


Cons. 


530-17500 


6v.DC 


6g. 














BF10936 


42.50 


Table 


530-17500 


6v.DC 


6g. 


7 


$37.95 


Auto 


550-1550 


6v.DC 


5g. 


BF10937 


57.00 


Cons. 


530-17500 


AC 


6c. 


17 


44.95 


Auto 


540-1600 


6v.DC 


6g. 


BF10938 


42.50 


Table 


530-17500 


AC 


6c. 


17-A 


44.95 


Auto 


540-1600 


6v.DC 


6g. 


BF 10939 


49.50 


Cons. 


530-17500 


AC 


5g. 


17-B 


45.95 


Auto 


540-1600 


6v.DC 


6g. 


BF10940 


62.50 


Table 


530-17500 


AC 


7c. 


17-C 


45.95 


Auto 


540-1600 


6v.DC 


6g. 


BF10942 


75.00 


Cons. 


530-17500 


AC 


7c. 


27 


54.95 


Auto 


540-1600 


6v.DC 


7g. 


BF10943 


55.00 


Table 


530-17500 


AC 


6c. 


37 


64.95 


Auto 


540-1600 


6v.DC 


8g- 


BF 10946 


65.00 


Cons. 


530-17500 


AC 


6c. 


41 


19.95 


Table 


540-1750 


AC 


4g. 


BF10150 


44.95 


Auto 


550-1500 


6v.DC 


6g- 


51 


32.95 


Table 


540*18000 


AC 


5g. 


BF10153 


37.95 


Auto 


550-1500 


6v.DC 


5g. 


51B 


34.95 


Table 


540*18000 


6v.DC 


4g. 














61 


49.95 


Table 


540-18000 


AC 


6g. 


RCA-Victor. 


J. 








61M 


57.95 


Table 


540-18000 


AC 


7m. 














62 


59.50 


Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


6g. 


103 


$ 22.50 


Table 


540-3500 


AC 


4g. 


62M 


67.50 


Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


7m. 


117 


32.95 


Table 


540*6850 


AC 


5g. 


81 


89.50 


Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


8g. 


125 


39.95 


Table 


540*18000 


AC 


6g. 


81M 


99.50 


Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


9m. 


214 


44.95 


Cons. 


540*6850 


AC 


5g. 














225 


54.95 


Cons. 


540*18000 


AC 


6g. 


Philco R 


adio & Television Corp. 


, Philadelphia, Pa. 






BC6-4 
BC6-6 


58. 50** 
83.95 


Cons. 
Cons. 


540-6900 
540*18000 


Batt. 
6v.DC 


6g. 
6g. 


32B 


$ 65.00 


Table 


540-3200 


32v.DC 


6g. 


BC7-9 


78. 95** 


Cons. 


540*18000 


Batt. 


7g. 


32F 


79.50 


Cons. 


540-3200 


32v.DC 


6g. 


BT6-3 


39. 25** 


Table 


540-6900 


Batt. 


6g. 


38B 


49. 95t 


Table 


540-2500 


Batt. 


5g. 














38F 


65.00t 


Cons. 


540-2500 


Batt. 


5g. 






(Continued 


on page 39) 







September, 1935 



37 



Haw! GRUNOW PRESENTS 

THE LAST WORD IN MODERN RADIO 

Amazing TOKE-TESTED RESONATOR, 
J^jew Super Hi-Fidelity Tone and 32, More 
Big Quality Features Bring Utterly J^ew 
Performance in Season's Most Beautiful Sets. 




Grunow Model 1241 — A superb 12-tube Super 
Hi-Fidelity radio— true all-wave, including 
weather band — that challenges qoi 
with setB selling at 8200.00 or " 
more. Lists at F. O. B. Factory 



$ 167 M 



/^NE look at these beautiful 
^^^ new Grunow s — and your 
eyes will tell you instantly that 
here's something made to order 
for you to sell. Then look inside ! 
.... and you'll find that Grunow 
quality, Grunow precision, 
Grunow leadership, is carried all 
the way through the new Grunow. 
Here you'll see the greatest tone 
development in years — the sensa- 
tional new TONE-TESTED RES- 
ONATOR that brings utterly new 



Super Hi-Fidelity tone to radio — 
plus new METAL tubes, Grunow 
Signal Beacon, variable selectiv- 
ity, Super Hi-Fidelity sound cir- 
cuit and speaker, new Aladdin 
Colorfiash dial and all the rest of 
the greatest list of selling features 
in radio today. Investigate — and 
prove to yourself that here's the 
line that will let you out-demon- 
strate and outsell any other line 
you can find. 



Radio's Greatest Values — Inside and Out 




Right — Grunow Model 520 
— A really amazing per- 
former for the AC-DC 
prospect. Lists at $AQ95 
F.O.B. Factory 

Left — Grunow Model 681 — 
Six metal tubes and many 
Grunow features in a 
world-range radio covering 
r, i.-.-is.niMi kc. Lists SCO 50 



Grunow Model 871— Eight metal 
tubeB in a true all-wave radio cover- 
ing weather reports, and including 
Tone-Tested Resonator, Aladdin 
Color Flash dial. etc. Lists $ 
at F.O.B. Factory . 



sggso 



Grunow Model 761 — A 
powerful 7-metal-tube 
nil-wave radio* includ- 
ing- weather 
Lists at F.O.B, 
Factory . . , 



PRICES are slightly 

higher on the WEST 

COAST 

Also a complete line 

of fine battery radios 



GsuuictiT J&utle- 

With "TONE -TESTED RESONATOR 




GENERAL HOUSEHOLD UTILITIES 



COMPANY • CHICAGO 



Grunow Model 1171 — A cabinet of cosily 
woods housing a powerful 11-tube Super Hi- 
Fidelity true all-wave receiver with 15 watts 
output and all Grunow ad vane- J< Q "f 50 
ments. Lists at F.O.B. Factory . 101 



38 



Radio Today 



RADIO RECEIVERS FOR 1935-36— Compiled b y Radio Tod ay 



(Continued from page 37) 



Model 


Retail Price 




Kilocycle 


Power 


Number 


Model 


Retail Price 




Kilocycle 


Power 


Num 


>er 


Number 


Complete 


Cabinet 


Range 


Supply 


of Tubes 


Number 


Complete 


Cabinet 


Range 


Supply 


of Tubes 


RCA. Victor, Camden, N. 2 .—{continued) 






L. Tatro Products Corp 


, Decorah, 


Iowa — {continued) 




BT6-5 


64.95 


Table 


540*18000 


6v.DC 


6g. 


T6216 




Table 


550-3800 


32v.DC 


g. 


BT7-8 


62.95** 


Table 


540*18000 


Batt. 


7g. 


U5226 




Table 


545*18000 


32v.DC 


g. 


C8-15 


99.50 


Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


8c. 


V5226 




Cons. 


545*18000 


32v.DC 


g. 


C9-4 


118.50 


Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


9c. 


W6236 




Table 


545*18000 


32v.DC 


g. 


Cll-1 


150.00 


Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


lie. 


X6236 




Cons. 


545*18000 


32v.DC 


g. 


C13-2 


189. 50 


Cons. 


140*60000 


AC 


13c. 


Y6236 




Cons. 


545*18000 


32v.DC 


g. 


C15-3 


250.00 


Cons. 


140*60000 


AC 


15c. 














D9-19 




Cons. 


140*18000 


AC 


9c. 


United American-Bosch Corp. (Bosch), Springfield 


, Mass. 




Dll-2 




Cons. 


140*18000 


AC 


lie. 














D22-1 




Cons. 


140*60000 


AC 


22c. 


04 


$ 17.95 


Table 


540-3000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


M-101 


44.95 


Auto 


540-1600 


6v.DC 


5g. 


05 


29.95 


Table 


540*15000 


AC- DC 


6g. 


M104 


49.95 


Auto 


540-1600 


6v.DC 


5g. 


376N 


69.90** 


Cons. 


540-1600 


Batt. 


5g. 


M108 


57.95 


Auto 


540-1600 


6v.DC 


5g. 


385 


39. 95** 


Cons. 


540-1620 


Batt. 


5g. 


M109 


74.95 


Auto 


540-1600 


6v.DC 


7g. 


386 


59. 95** 


Cons. 


530*19000 


Batt. 


6g. 


R-93 
T4-8 


16.50 
20 00 


Record player 
Table 540-1720 


AC 
AC 


4g. 


430J 
430T 


54.95 
39.95 


Cons. 
Cons. 


540*18000 
540*18000 


AC 
AC 


5g. 

5g. 


T4-9 


24.95 


Table 


540-1720 


AC 


4g. 


480D 


155. 00 


Cons. 


540-22500 


AC 


lOg. 


T4-10 


19.95 


Table 


540-1720 


AC-DC 


4g. 


505 


29.95 


Table 


540-3600 


AC 


5g. 


T5-2 


29.95 


Table 


540-3500 


AC 


5g. 


510 


34.95 


Cons. 


540-3600 


AC 


5g. 


T8-14 


79.95 


Table 


540-18000 


AC 


8c. 


510E 


49.95 


Cons. 


540-3600 


AC 


5g. 


T10-1 


99.50 


Table 


540-18000 


AC 


10c. 


524 


43.95 


Auto 


540-1550 


6v.DC 


5g. 














575F 


65.95 


Cons. 


540-18500 


AC 


7c. 














575Q 


85.95 


Cons. 


540-18500 


AC 


7c. 


Simples 


Radio Co., Sandusky. Ohic 








585Y 


79.95 


Cons. 


540-18500 


AC 


8c. 














585Z 


99.50 


Cons. 


540-18500 


AC 


8c. 


4Z 


$13.25 


Table 


540-1750 


AC-DC 


4g. 


595M 


169. 50 


Cons. 


150*18500 


AC 


10c. 


5C 


19.50 


Table 


540-4000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


595P 


139. 50 


Cons. 


150*18500 


AC 


10c. 


5D 


24.95 


Table 


540-4000 


AC-DC 


5g- 


634 


48.95 


Auto 


540-1550 


6 v. DC 


6g. 


5D 


33.50 


Cons. 


540-4000 


AC-DC 


5g. 












5DA 
5DA 


24.95** 
33. 50** 


Table 
Cons. 


540-4000 
540-4000 


Batt. 
Batt. 


5g. 
5g. 


United Motors Service (Delco), 3044 West Grand Blvd., Detroit 


Mich. 


5DB 


31.95 


Table 


540-4000 


6v.DC 


5g. 


1101 




Table 


540-1725 


AC-DC 


5g. 


5DB 


40.50 


Cons. 


540-4000 


6v.DC 


5g. 


1105 




Table 


540-4500 


AC 


5g. 


5DF 


33.95 


Table 


540-4000 


32v.DC 


4g. 


1106 




Table 


540*6300 


AC 


5g. 


5DF 


42.50 


Cons. 


540-4000 


32v.DC 


4g. 


1107 




Table 


540*15500 


AC 


6g. 


6G 


33.95 


Table 


540-16000 


AC 


6g. 


1108 




Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


6g. 


6G 


49.95 


Cons. 


540-16000 


AC 


6g. 


1109 




Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


8c. 


6GH 


33.95 


Table 


540-16000 


AC-DC 


6g. 


1110 




Cons. 


150*18000 


AC 


10c. 


6GH 


49.95 


Cons. 


540-16000 


AC-DC 


6g. 














6GM 


39.95 


Table 


540-16000 


AC 


6m. 


Wells-Gard 








6GM 


55.95 


Cons. 


540-16000 


AC 


6m. 














8J 
8J 


59.50 


Table 


150-22000 


AC 


8g. 


26R1 




Auto 


530-1650 


6v.DC 


6g. 


73.50 


Cons. 


150-22000 


AC 


8g. 


30D568 




Cons. 


535-18300 


AC 


10c 




8JM 


67.50 


Table 


150-22000 


AC 


8m. 


32C570 




Cons. 


535-18300 


AC 


12c 




8JM 


81.50 


Cons. 


150-22000 


AC 


8m. 


35G510 




Table 


525-1750 


Batt. 


5g 




T 


37.75 


Auto 


550-1550 


6v.DC 


5g. 


35G560 




Cons. 


526-1750 


Batt. 


5g 




TA 


33.95 


Auto 


550-1550 


6v.DC 


4g. 


36D510 




Table 


530-1750 


32v.DC 


6g 




V 


18.00 


Table 


540-4000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


36D560 




Cons. 


530-1750 


32v.DC 


6g 




Y 


21.50 


Table 


540-4000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


36F552 




Cons. 


535-46000 


AC 


16c 




Y 


29.95 


Cons. 


540-4000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


37E508 
37E566 
37G508 




Table 
Cons. 
Table 


535-16000 
535-16000 
535-18300 


Batt. 
Batt. 
AC 


7g 
7g 
7c 




Sparks-Wltl. !•■!>.•''■« c<> 


(Sparton) 


Jackson, Mich. 






37G566 




Cons. 


535-18300 


AC 


7c 
















37H508 




Table 


535-16000 


Batt. 


7g 
7g 




506 


$ 29.95 


Table 


550-6000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


37H566 




Cons. 


535-16000 


Batt. 




516 


39.95 


Table' 


550-6000 


AC 


5g. 


37G510 




Table 


535*18300 


AC 


7c 




616 


49.95 


Table 


530-20000 


AC 


6g. 


37J560 




Cons. 


535*18300 


AC 


7c 




666 


69.95 


Cons. 


530-20000 


AC 


6g. 


39C568 




Cons. 


530-16000 


Batt. 


9g 




716X 


79.50 


Table 


530-20000 


AC 


7g. 














766 
966 


89.50 
110.00 


Cons. 
Cons. 


530-20000 
530-20000 


AC 
AC 


7g. 
9g. 


Westlnghouse Electric Supply Co., 


150 Varick St., 


New York City 


1086 


200.00 


Cons. 


530-20000 


AC 


10g. 


WR-100 


$ 25. 00 


Table 


540-4000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


1166 


170. 00 


Cons. 


150-20000 


AC 


Hg- 


WR-101 


39.95 


Table 


540*16000 


AC-DC 


6c. 


1466 


240.00 


Cons. 


150-20000 


AC 


14c. 


WR-201 


19.95 


Table 


540-3200 


AC 


5g. 














WR-203 


44.95 


Table 


540*16000 


AC 


6?. 














WR-204 


65.95 


Table 


540-18500 


AC 


7c. 


Stewart- Warner Corp., 


1826 Diversey Pkway. Chicago, 111. 




WR-205 


79.95 


Table 


120*18500 


AC 


8c. 


1301 
1302 
1306 


$ 44.50 
42.50 
57.50 


Table 
Table 


530*18200 
530*18200 
530*18200 


AC 
AC 
AC 


5g. 
5g. 
5g. 
6g. 
7m. 


WR-303 
WR-304 
WR-305 


59.95 
85.95 
99.50 


Cons. 
Cons. 
Cons. 


504*16000 
540-18500 
120*18500 


AC 
AC 
AC 


6c. 
7c. 
8c. 


1345 


69.50 


Cons' 


545*6800 


AC 


WR-306 


139. 50 


Cons. 


120*18500 


AC 


10c. 


1361 


69.50 


Table 


545*18000 


AC 


WR-500 


48.95 


Auto 


540-1500 


6v.DC 


6g. 


1362 


74.50 


Table 


545*18000 


AC 


7m. 


WR-501 


44.95 


Auto 


540-1500 


6v.DC 


6g. 


1365 


94.50 


Cons. 


545*18000 


AC 


7m. 


WR-601 


34.95** 


Table 


540-3900 


Batt. 


5g. 


1366 


89.50 


Cons. 


545*18000 


AC 


7m. 


WR-602 




Table 


540*16000 


6v.DC 


6g. 


1375 
1376 


119.50 
129.50 


Cons. 
Cons. 


140*18000 
140*18000 


AC 
AC 


9c. 
9c. 


Zenith Radio Corp., 3620 Iron St., Chicago, 111 






1385 


144. 50 


Cons. 


140*18000 


AC 


lie. 


4T26 


$ 20.00 


Table 


540-3700 


AC 


4mg. 


1386 


159. 50 


Cons. 


140*18000 


AC 


lie. 


4T51 


39.95 


Cons. 


540-3700 


AC 


4mg. 


1388 


275.00 


Cons. 


140*18000 


AC 


lie. 


4V31 


39.95 


Table 


550-1800 


6v.DC 


4g. 


1391 


42. 50** 


Table 


530-1750 


Batt. 


7g. 


4V59 


59.95 


Cons. 


550-1800 


6v.DC 


4g. 


1395 


57. 50** 


Cons. 


530-1750 


Batt. 


7g. 


5S29 


39.95 


Table 


535*18500 


AC 


5mg. 


1401 


32.50 


Table 


540-4600 


AC 


5g. 


5S56 


59.95 


Cons. 


535*18500 


AC 


5mg. 














6S27 


59.95 


Table 


535*18500 


AC 


6mg. 


Stromberg-Carlson Telephone Mfg. Co., Rochester 


, N. Y. 




6S52 
6V27 


69.95 
69.95 


Cons. 
Table 


535*18500 
550*23000 


AC 
6v.DC 


6mg. 
6g. 


58-T 


$ 59. 50 


Table 


540*18000 


AC 


6g. 


6V62 


89.95 


Cons. 


550*23000 


6v.DC 


6g. 


58-L 


78.50 


Cons. 


540*18000 


AC 


6g. 


7S28 


75.00 


Table 


550*23000 


AC 


7mg. 


58-W 


92.50 


Cons. 


540*18000 


AC 


6g. 


7S53 


89.95 


Cons. 


550*23000 


AC 


7mg. 


61 -T 


66.00 


Table 


540*18000 


AC 


7c. 


9S30 


85.00 


Table 


550*23000 


AC 


9mg. 


61-L 


85.00 


Cons. 


540*18000 


AC 


7c. 


9S54 


99.95 


Cons. 


550*23000 


AC 


9mg. 


61-W 


99.00 


Cons. 


540*18000 


AC 


7c. 


9S55 


119.95 


Cons. 


550*23000 


AC 


9mg. 


62 


132.50 


Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


8c. 


12A57 


139. 95 


Cons. 


141*23000 


AC 


12mg. 


63 


145.00 


Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


8c. 


12A58 


159. 95 


Cons. 


141*23000 


AC 


12mg. 


65 


135. 00 


Spec. 


540-1500 


AC 


9g. 


16A61 


375.00 


Cons. 


141*23000 


AC 


16mg. 


70 


495.00 


Cons. 


520-23000 


AC 


13g. 


16A63 


450. 00 


Cons. 


141*23000 


AC 


16mg 


72 


795.00 


Cons. 


520-23000 


AC 


13g. 


Stratosphere 750. 00 


Cons. 


535-63600 


AC 


25g. 


74 


985.00 


Cons. 


520-23000 


AC 


16g. 


664 


39.95 


Auto 


535. 1600 


6v.DC 


5g. 


82 


187. 50 


Cons. 


520-23000 


AC 


lOg. 


666 


49.95 


Auto 


535-1600 


6v.DC 


6g. 














668 


54.95 


Auto 


535-1600 


6v.DC 


6g. 


L. Tatro Products Corp 


, Decorah, 


Iowa 






c. indicates combination of metal tubes and glass 


tubes in receiver 


M4616 




Table 


540-1740 


6v.DC 


g. 


g. indicates glass tubes 


in receiver 








04626 




Table 


545*18000 


6v.DC 


g. 


m. indicates metal tubes in receivei 








P4626 




Cons. 


545*18000 


6v.DC 


g. 


mg. indicates metal-glass 


tubes in receiver 






Q5636 




Table 


545*18000 


6v.DC 


g. 


* in 


kilocycle range indicates not continuous range 


between limits indicated 


R5636 




Cons. 


545*18000 


6v.DC 


g. 


** less batteries 










S6636 




Cons. 


545*18000 


6v.DC 


g. 


t includes batteries 













September, 1935 



39 



for more than 
fifteen years . . . 

CLAROSTAT 




THIS NAME has stood for 
dependable components, hon- 
estly sold. CLAROSTAT prod- 
ucts were marketed when radio 
first began. The organization is 
still owned and actively managed 
by its founders. 

Set manufacturers, wholesalers, 
dealers, and service men who 
demand ruggedness and quality 
products have for years specified 
CLAROSTAT for initial equip- 
ment and replacement parts. 

The Clarostat engineering staff 
is constantly designing and test- 
ing all forms of radio controls 
and components, and in doing so 
is always abreast of develop- 
ments in the radio and allied 
industries. 

Some of the precision products 
which Clarostat pioneered 
follows: 

Wire Wound Potentiometers 

Wire Wound Rheostats 

Composition Element Potentiometers 

Constant Impedance Controls 

Mixer Controls 

Faders 

Tone Controls 

Volume Controls 

Automatic Voltage Regulators 

Ballast Resistors 

Line Reducing Resistors 

Compression Rheostats 

Fixed Resistors 

Fixed Center Tapped Resistors 

Variable Center Tapped Resistors 

Flexible Resistors 

Metal Covered Heavy Duty Resistors 

Metal Covered Voltage Dividers 

L Pads and T Pads 

CLAROSTAT 

MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 
285 N.6th St. 
Brooklyn fc 

N. y. 



THE DAY OF BETTER SERVICE 



Shoestring investment and haywire methods on the way out 





By JOHN F. RIDER 
Service Editor, Radio Today 

* ONE of the reasons why chaos 
reigns in the servicing field is be- 
cause it is possible for Tom, Dick or 
Harry to establish himself as a serv- 
ice man with a very small invest- 
ment. It may not sound very pleas- 
ant to many servicemen, but the shoe 
string investment is on the way out. 
The average investment made by 
servicemen in testing equipment dur- 
ing years past has been less than 
$150. The day is not far distant 
when, in order to be able to cope 
with servicing problems of the times, 
this investment is going to mount to 
at least $500, and there will be many 
shops with an investment approxi- 
mating $1,000. 

It is, of course, impossible to force 
a definite investment when an indi- 
vidual enters the service field — but 
the nature of the receivers, which will 
be coming in for service, will force 
the service station operator to ac- 
quire apparatus which will enable 
rapid operation. No finer invest- 
ment can be made than in equipment 
which expedites testing. Time is ex- 
tremely valuable in the service sta- 
tion and every ten minutes saved 
helps keep the operating cost down. 
Therein lie the profits. 



Courage 

Time and again service station op- 
erators have bewailed the high cost 
of apparatus. An analysis of the 
situation will show that servicing on 
the whole would be far more lucra- 
tive if the initial investment required 
to open a service shop would be $2,000 
instead of $200. Fewer men would 
be in the business and the greater 
responsibility would tend to stabilize 
the industry. 

We have traveled the country far 
and wide during the past 12 months. 
We attended very many service meet- 
ings. At each of these meetings one 
or more service station operators 
would be honest and confess that 
they have become very much dis- 
heartened at the low earnings avail- 
able in the service field. The bad 
part of the situation is that most of 
these men were competent and had 
plenty of work, but found that earn- 
ings were small. 

We have but one answer. What is 



needed is the courage to charge a 
profitable price for work done. That 
is the crux of the entire problem. . . . 
Charge enough so that a profit is 
left. ... It means the loss of some 
business — but that which is secured 
is profitable and while it may not 
appear so upon the surface of things, 
those jobs which are profitable seem 
to amount to more in dollars and 
cents than all of the business done 
at lower prices. 

Must pay 

The service industry of the nation 
must develop the courage required to 
cease paying for the radio entertain- 
ment of the American public. If 
Mr. John Public desires to have his 
radio repaired, he must pay the price. 
Altogether too many service men 
have served the American public at 
a sacrifice to themselves. . . . Many 
years of operation at non-profitable 
prices has wiped away all semblance 
of financial respectability. 

The service industry as a group 
can well learn from their suppliers. 
When the service man buys a test- 
ing unit or some other piece of shop 
equipment he is forced to pay a cer- 
tain established price. . . . No pay — 
no equipment. . . . Suppliers have 
the courage to charge the price which 
they feel they should receive for their 
merchandise, if they are to stay in 
business. . . . Servicemen should do 
the same. . . . Otherwise the finish 
is inevitable. . . . No business can 
continue without earning a profit. 
(Please turn to page 42) 



Hey — Doctor ! 



#ello! Doctor Jimmie Morgaa 



Phone . <-^r : . 

6068Z 

WEST END RADIO CO. 



Birmingham, Ala., presents this. 
At right note "sick radio" with 
bandaged head and doleful face. 



40 



Radio Today 



The Y&^Sf 1936 
Replacement Volume Control Manual 




Yaxley doesn't be- 
lieve in resting on its 
laurels. Its constant ad- 
vances in volume con- 
trol development prove 
that! The latest and greatest 
edition of the Yaxley Replace- 
ment Volume Control Manual 
proves it, too ! 

Twenty -four months were de- 
voted to the production of this 
invaluable book. Five radio ser- 
vice engineers — specially trained 
for the task — compiled, checked 
and re-checked the data that makes 
it the most complete and comprehen- 
sive manual of its kind ever offered to 
you by anyone. Its preparation took plenty 
of time and plenty of work. And it will 
save you plenty of time, plenty of money, 
and plenty of grief. 

The 1936 Yaxley Replacement Volume Control 
Manual lists more set models than any other. It 
provides more factual data. It contains a complete 
catalog of Yaxley approved radio products. No 
service man can well afford to do without it. It's 
complete — authoritative— up-to-date! And it's free. 



Mail the Coupon Now 
for your FREE copy 



YAXLEY MANUFACTURING DIVISION 

of P. R. Mallory & Co., Inc. 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA Cable Address : PELMALLO 



rWf ««sr £0ITIO N.. 



and that was heralded as the 
greatest manual ever published 



USE THE 




MANUAL 
and save yourself time 
. . . trouble and money 

Yaxley Manufacturing Division 
of P. R. Mallory & Co., Inc. 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Gentlemen : 

Please send me — absolutely free — a copy of the 
1936 Yaxley Replacement Volume Control Manual. 

Name . 

Address 

My Jobber's Name is 



September, 1935 



41 



SERVICING — JOHN F. RIDER 



(Continued from page 40) 



'ATTENTION 7 



DEALERS 
DISTRIBUTORS 



And complete line of 
''Quality'' Con so 1 e s , 
Table Models arid 
Compacts with new 
characteristics and 
amazing performance 
at a price advantage 
over all competition. 

METAL TUBES 

INTERCHANGEABLE WITH GLASS 

THE "HOT" LINE THIS 

YEAR THAT IT WILL PAY 

YOU TO INVESTIGATE 

Write for open territory 
INTERNATIONAL RADIO CORP. 

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, U.S.A. 
"Originators of AC-DC Radio " 



... It hangs on and hangs on — 
but eventually it goes. . . . 

Too many servicemen lack the 
courage to turn a job down — to tell 
Mr. John Public that the price is so 
and so and that's that. . . . The serv- 
ice industry, like any other industry, 
is entitled to a respectable income, 
so that the members can live like 
human beings. . . . Courage is what is 
needed ! . . . Courage to refuse to do 
business at a loss ! . . . The courage 
to charge a profitable price! 

Cathode-ray 

Opinion is divided concerning the 
suitability of the cathode-ray oscillo- 
graph for use in the radio servicing 
field. We hail its exploitation as the 
start of a new era in servicing, with 
far-reaching influence. The "nays" 
claim that the instrument belongs in 
the laboratory and that the type of 
information made available through 
the application of the oscillograph is 
not necessary for successful servic- 
ing. As evidence, there is offered the 
spectacle of many years of servicing 
without the use of oscillography. 

We cannot agree with these opin- 
ions. We have worked with the tube 
for more than nine years and the 
past eight months have been spent 
in a concentrated comparison of its 
merits during service operation, as 
against the usual routine mode of 
operation utilizing conventional ap- 
paratus. We have been firmly con- 
vinced that the introduction of the 
cathode-ray oscillograph as a servic- 
ing tool will prove beneficial to the 
service technician as well as the ra- 
dio industry at large. 

The cathode-ray oscillograph is 
not a highly technical device. Its 
operating principles can be compre- 
hended as readily as the operating 
principles of any other testing unit. 
As to the value of the information 
which can be secured by applying the 
tube to practical use, it is our opin- 
ion, for what it is worth, that such 
information is extremely essential to 
satisfactory servicing and to the ad- 
vancement of the servicing art on 
the whole. 

It is freely admitted that the tube 
has use in the design of radio appa- 
ratus. As such, it must have use in 
the servicing of radio apparatus, in 
order to establish the existence of 
the conditions which were originally 
planned into the receiver or amplifier 
by the design engineer. 



It has been said by those who are 
not in favor of the cathode-ray oscil- 
lograph as a serviceman's tool, that 
interpretation of the images is not 
within the realm of the servicing 
field. Particular reference is made 
to audio waveform patterns. The 
statement is true at this time, but 
there is no sensible reason why the 
statement should remain true. Tech- 
nical advancement of the servicing 
industry is just as important as ad- 
vancement in radio receiver design. 
However, it is admitted that the 
waveform test to establish distortion 
is an excellent means of checking the 
operation of the receiver. If this be 
true, why should the service indus- 
try be penalized, because during its 
routine study of radio principles, the 
subject relating to the images, which 
can be developed upon the cathode- 
ray oscillograph screen, was, shall 
we say, neglected or considered but 
briefly. 

To neiv heights 

Why should the radio industry de- 
velop equipment "down" to the serv- 
icing level? Why not develop appa- 
ratus which will bring the servicing 
industry "up" to the level of modern 
radio receiver design ? An examina- 
tion of servicing literature issued 
during the past ten years, shows al- 
most a total absence of references to 
the audio system in the receiver. 
Perhaps this was due to the relative 
simplicity of the audio channels used 
in receivers, but now that audio 
channels in radio receivers are very 
much more complicated and public 
address amplifier manufacturing is 
an important industry, closer atten- 
tion must be paid to what takes place 
in the audio part of the receiver. 

Comprehension of the significance 
of waveforms is just as important as 
the function of the AVC system. It 
is a well recognized fact that a sub- 
stantial amount of distortion may 
exist in a receiving system, or for 
that matter in an amplifying system, 
due to any one of a number of causes, 
related to dynamic rather than static 
conditions, which will not be evident 
to any but the critical observer. That, 
however, is not justification for de- 
claring that receiver system or ampli- 
fying system to be satisfactorily 
serviced. The serviced system should 
be in perfect shape, without any 
question of operation left in doubt. 

If the audio waveform test is valu- 
able to the man who can interpret 



42 



Radio Today 



the pattern and thus deliver a more 
perfectly serviced system to the cus- 
tomer, is it not preferable to teach 
the subject, so that the value of the 
test may be realized, rather than not 
teach the subject, not make the test 
and not secure the information? It 
is a perfectly normal request to make 
of the service industry, that it be- 
come technically more proficient. 
That it obtain a more thorough 
grounding in radio technique in or- 
der to be able to employ testing 
equipment which is on a par with 
modern radio receiver development. 
The proper application of the cathode- 
ray oscillograph places servicing 
capabilities at least close to, if not 
on the same level with modern re- 
ceiver design. 

Complicated stuff 

It is impossible to deny that the 
servicing industry, being called upon 
to work on highly complicated appa- 
ratus, requires equipment which will 
enable operation upon this complex 
interlocked system with the ease and 
accuracy that was possible with the 
simpler receivers of years ago. Design 
engineers incorporate special dual 
channel audio systems in the effort 
to raise the standard of tone quality. 
. . . What apparatus is available for 
the testing of such system by the 
service group? More and more of 
the receivers placed in the field con- 
tain specially filtered circuits in the 
speaker systems. What apparatus is 
available to the service group for the 
testing of such systems? Phase in- 
version systems were incorporated by 
design engineers, yet no equipment 
was developed for the simple and 
rapid methods of determining if that 
which the design engineer desired, 
was being accomplished in a service 
receiver. 

Transmitter power has been in- 
creased all over the country. Re- 
ceivers have been made more sensi- 
tive, yet very little attention, if any, 
has been devoted to troubles relating 
to these items in certain parts of the 
receiver. What is taking place in 
the oscillator system of a superhetero- 
dyne receiver? Can one assume that 
if the static operating potentials are 
correct, the oscillator output is cor- 
rect? . . . Can one assume that since 
the static operating potentials are 
correct, that i-f amplifiers provide 
the correct gain and are not over- 
loaded? 

We recognize that if service tests 
are made too elaborate, the possi- 
bility exists of miscomprehension of 
the significance of the tests. ... If 
that is one of the reasons why the 
cathode-ray oscillograph is tabooed 



by some, then the problem at hand is 
the education of the servicing indus- 
try to realize that its function is the 
maintenance of radio receivers and 
allied units and not criticism of the 
systems. Everything points to even 
greater complications in radio re- 
ceivers of the future. Who knows 
the extent of the complexity of the 
future television receiver? . . . Now 
is the time to start the education of 
the service field in anticipation of 
future requirements. 

It has been said that some instru- 
ment manufacturers looked askance 
at the cathode-ray oscillograph, be- 
cause they felt that it would provide 
a means whereby service men would 
be able to determine the efficacy of 
such units as oscillators. That may 
be true. ... So what? ... Is the 
answer the continuance of the manu- 
facture of equipment which may be 
subject to such criticism, or is the 
answer found in the changing of the 
design, so that it meets present day 
requirements. 

It has also been said that instru- 
ment manufacturers did not look 
with favor upon the cathode-ray os- 
cillograph because it would replace 
certain units. In our estimation that 
viewpoint is wrong. Practically all 
existing service equipment, with the 
possible exception of the output 
meter, is related to static tests. The 
cathode-ray tube is essentially a dy- 
namic testing device. That it may 
eliminate the output meter is a pos- 
sibility, maybe a probability, but 
even if it does, the instrument manu- 
facturers will not suffer. The ex- 
ploitation of the cathode-ray oscillo- 
graph is going to mean the sale of 
audio oscillators, frequency modula- 
tors, etc. ... In the long run, the 
instrument manufacturers will gain, 
instead of losing. 

Costs money 

We do not hesitate to make this 
statement directly to the service fra- 
ternity. It is not a matter of recom- 
mending increased financial expendi- 
tures on the part of the service group. 
Such apparatus is required for the 
correct application of the cathode-ray 
oscillograph and for the completion 
of service tests comparable with mod- 
ern radio receiver design. 

The day is gone when knowledge 
alone will bridge the gulf between 
modern radio receiver design and 
servicing capabilities. Equipment 
comparable with the work to be done 
and with the speed of operation re- 
quired, is the order of the day. . . . 
The cathode-ray oscillograph is the 
first of these devices. . . . Many more 
will follow. 



5*§L- smooth 




Yes sir 

. . . he's a smooth article 
. . . and that's why SERV- 
ICEMEN and Experimenters 
everywhere pin their faith on 
CENTRALAB Controls. 
Smooth . . . of course 
. for the Centralab Ra- 
diohm employs that famous 
patented non-rubbing contact 
that never seems to wear out 
and gives a replacement service 
that invariably works "better 
than ever before." 

and you don't need a 
big stock to be able to service 
practically any job. 



Write or see your 

jobber for the 

new, revised, 

accurate 

CENTRALAB 

VOLUME 

CONTROL 

GUIDE 




f&ery Radio Service Man 
ffi£$ skmtld btamtmbirofrfu 
Wtnstauu el -B^d-i Strr^a flit" 



■ CENTRALAB'S smoothness results 
from the patented CENTRALAB 
non-rubbing contact whereby a strip 
of polished metal rocks on the resistor 
so that the only rubbing action is 
between an oilless wood bearing and 
the polished metal. 



Central 

Radio Laboratories 

Milwaukee, Wis* 

Manufacturers of 
CENTRALAB RADIOHMS 

AND 

CENTRALAB FIXED RESISTORS 



Gen 



■ tj 



September, 1935 



43 



JVEW 
Power Output 
TUBE TESTER 

TESTS ALL TYPES 
METAL AND GLASS 




Model No. 1501 
Dealers Net Price $46.67 



NEW TRIPLETT MULTI-PURPOSE TUBE 
TESTER No. 1501 combines ten instru- 
ments in one. Here are the ten instru- 
ments: 

1. Test all type tubes (New Power Output Test) 

2. Neon Short Test 

3. Separate Diode Tests 

4. Neon Paper Condenser Tests 

5. Electrolytic Condenser Leakage 

6. D.C. Voltmeter and Milltammeter 

7. Ohmmeter 

8. A. C. Voltmeter 

9. Decibel Meter 
10. Impedance Meter 

Radio dealers have always wanted a tube 
tester that would test tubes under condi- 
tions approximating their use in a radio 
set. Here it is. Try it out. See for yourself 
how this instrument can save you time in 
hunting for troubles and help you sell 
more tubes. 

Model 1500 is a Power Output Tube 
Tester with Neon Short test and shadow- 
graph line voltage indicator. 

Dealers Net Price . . . $36.67 
For more information see your jobber. 
Send for catalogue to 

THE TRIPLETT 

ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT CO. 

Bluffton, Ohio 



* tJfr ***** t ***** *l 



pMCiAWH 1 



feLECTRJCAX LN STRU MINTS 

Mai! Coupon for Details 

i 

TRIPLETT ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT CO. 
Dept. RT-J Bluffton, Ohio, U. S. A. 

Please send me (check) 

More information 1501, 1500 1936 

Catalogue information on 

Name 

Street 

City 



-State- 



SERVICE NOTES-RIDER 

Using cathode-ray oscillograph 



* Ever since the start 
of the exploitation of visual align- 
ment apparatus employing the cath- 
ode-ray tube, the matter of basic re- 
sponse curves to be used for compari- 
son with the images appearing upon 
the screen, has been the subject of 
discussion. . . . What type of curve 
should be developed in the i-f. ampli- 
fier? . . . How can a serviceman align 
visually if he does not know the 
proper curve for the system? . . . 
These are the two leading questions 
hurled at men who speak about visual 
alignment. 

The problem is not as difficult as 
it appears. Standard response curves 
for comparison are valuable, but it 
is possible to get along within them, 
that is, if the operator is familiar 
with the various types of response 
curves which may be developed with 
tuned circuit of the variety to be 
found in radio receivers. Inciden- 
tally, this type of information is also 
of value to the man who does not 
possess cathode-ray tube type of 
alignment equipment and who is 
using the conventional meter type 
indicators. 

Basically, there are two types of 
response curves of interest in con- 
nection with alignment. One of these 
is the single-peak type of curve 
which results from loose or critical 



coupling of the circuits involved, 
and the other is the dual-peaked or 
even triple-peaked response curve 
which results from over-coupling of 
the circuits involved. 

As a general rule, the majority of 
i-f. transformers utilized in super- 
heterodyne receivers, unless other- 
wise stated, are of the loose-coupled 
type and when properly adjusted de- 
velop a single-peaked response curve. 
However, it is possible to develop 
double-peaked response curves by 
over-coupling the two circuits, usu- 
ally found in these transformers. 
I-f. transformers which employ three 
coils are usually over-coupled and de- 
velop multi-peak response curves, 
usually of the dual peak variety. 

Speaking in generalities, the re- 
sponse curve developed with a trans- 
former is a function of the coupling 
between the circuit and the adjust- 
ment of the tuning trimmers. Units 
which are designed to develop a 
single-peak, when very accurately 
tuned have a sharp peak with steep 
sides. Incidentally, the steepness of 
the sides is a function of the efficiency 
characteristics of the unit. The more 
efficient the unit electrically, the 
steeper the sides and the greater the 
response to the peak frquency, which 
is the resonant frequency of the 




r^r: i r i 

450 4?7 -46t> 46? 470 



Fig. 1 — Unretouched photographs of cathode-ray patterns taken by John 
F. Rider, service editor of Radio Today 



44 



Radio Today 



transformer. The greater the effec- 
tive resistance of the circuit, the 
lower the amplitude of the response 
curve for any given signal input and 
the broader the shape of the curve. 
Response curves are spoken of as 
being symmetrical and assymmetrical 
(or non-symmetrical). Without any 
reference curves to guide the oper- 
ator, the curve desired is that which 
is symmetrical in response, irrespec- 
tive of the number of peaks; it may 
be a single peak or a double peak. 
A symmetrical response curve is one 
which shows equal response to fre- 
quencies which differ by like amount 
from the peak or resonant frequency 
on both sides. With this in mind, 
the operator working upon such tuned 
circuits can seek to attain symmetry 
of response with meter type indica- 
tors or with cathode-ray tube appa- 
ratus. 



Lining 'em up 

An example of a single-peaked re- 
sponse curve which displays symmetry 
is shown in Fig. la. This is an os- 
cillogram of a response curve, peaked 
at 460 kc. and being swept by a sig- 
nal which varies in frequency from 
450 kc. to 470 kc. Note that the 
response of the circuit to frequencies 
within 5kc. below the peak frequency, 
is substantially the same as for fre- 
quencies within 5 kc. above the peak 
frequency. This oscillogram is not 
necessarily an indication of what 
would be a perfectly-aligned circuit 
with respect to the frequencies 
passed, for as you can see, response 
at 5 kc. below and above is substan- 
tially zero, but it is a good example 
of a symmetrical response curve. 
The correct curve, assuming desired 
5 kc. response each side of the peak, 
would be of this shape; that is, sym- 
metrical, but response at 5 kc. differ- 
ence above and below the peak fre- 
quency, would be much greater. 

Such symmetry can be secured 
with meter type indicators, by first 
aligning for maximum response and 
then noting the response at various 
frequencies within the desired band 
pass range, above and below the peak 
frequency. Operating with meter 
type indicators is by no means as 
effective as with visual devices which 
show the actual response curve, but 
if a man does not possess such equip- 
ment, he must work with what he has, 
hence this information. 

An example of a symmetrical re- 
sponse curve for an over coupled 
circuit is shown in Fig. lb. There 
are two peaks, rather than one, but 
the response of the circuit, to fre- 



quencies which differ by like amount 
above and below the peak frequency 
is substantially the same. Such a 
curve can be said to be representative 
of the response when an i-f. system 
is adjusted for high-fidelity operation. 
Once more we desire to call to your 
attention that we are speaking about 
the shape of the curve and not its 
frequency response with respect to 
the band pass required in a high- 
fidelity system. Note that the peaks 
occur are frequencies which represent 
like differences from the peak, above 
and below the peak frequency. 

Flatten 'em out 

If the adjustment specifications 
call for such peaks to occur at 7.5 kc. 
higher than the peak frequency and 
for 7.5 kc. lower than the peak fre- 
quency, and the amplitude of the 
peaks at these two frequencies is the 
same, the response will be symmetri- 
cal or sufficiently so, to be classed as 
being satisfactory. There is of course 
much more to the adjustment of such 
a circuit, in that the extent of the 
dip at the peak frequency can be 
more or less than is shown, with re- 
spect to the amplitude of the peaks. 
If a flat-top characteristic is desired, 
then the dip would be the minimum 
consistent with the maximum re- 
sponse over the entire band. The 
experienced operator can develop 
such a response curve with meter type 
indicators, without using the cathode- 
ray tube, but the time required would 
be many, many times that when cath- 
oderay equipment is used. 

Trick tuning 

Symmetry is possible with a triple- 
peaked curve, just as it is with a dou- 
ble- or single-peaked curve. See figure 
lc. As a matter of fact, the triple- 
peaked response curve was obtained 
with the equipment which developed 
the double-peaked curve mentioned 
before. The change from one curve 
to the other is purely a matter of 
tuning adjustment of the respective 
trimmers. An example of a non- 
symmetrical or a symmetrical re- 
sponse curve with three peaks is 
shown in figure Id. The peak fre- 
quency is the same as in figure lb, 
but the response of the circuit to 
frequencies higher than the peak is 
not the same as at frequencies which 
differ by like amount from the peak, 
but are lower than the peak fre- 
quency. 

The lack of symmetry evident in 
figure Id, is not the maximum. The 
extent can be far greater, as is evi- 
(Please turn to page 47) 



NOISELESS 

ANTENNA 

SYSTEMS 




TACO noiseless antenna systems 
have produced results where 
others have failed. Equip your radio 
set with the antenna used by all radio 
engineers where the ultimate refine- 
ment of signals is required. 



l^'OISE reduction and extra signal 
1^1 strength in short wave, standard 
broadcast and European bands. 



DAPTABLE to all sets regardless 
of make or design. 



F; 



ACTORY assembled, wired, sold- 
ered, ready for use. List $6.75. 



|fe<>|d*B* Fill in coupon below and 
we will send you com- 
plete information. Carried by all 
leading supply houses. 

TECHNICAL APPLIANCE CORP. 
2726 Jackson Avenue 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 
Exp. Div. Rocke International El. Corp. 



TECHNICAL APPLIANCE CORP., 
2726 Jackson Are,, 
Long Island City, N. Y. 

( ) Send me your technical and sales 

dope. 
( ) My local jobber is 

of 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY . 



September, 1935 



45 



Co&Lmt- Qigu&A 



3>. 



] itech YOUR ATTENTION TO 

THE COLLINS 20C ONE-KILOWATT 
BROADCAST TRANSMITTER 



REASONABLE COST 



The price of the 20C bears a sensible 

relation to the actual cost of design and 

manufacture. 



HIGH FIDELITY. 



Collins broadcast equipment has estab- 
lished a unique reputation for faithful 
transmission. The frequency response of 
the 20C is uniform within plus or minus 
1.5 decibels from 30 to 1 0,000 c.p.s. 
Total r.m.s. harmonic content is less than 
5 per cent of the fundamental at 95 per 
cent modulation. 



QUIET CARRIER 



Carrier noise is held at least 60 decibels 

below program level by generous circuit 

design and without resorting to "hum 

bucking." 



RELIABILITY 



All components are oversized and ade- 
quately protected by overload devices. 



SIMPLICITY OF INSTALLATION 



The 20C operates from single phase cur- 
rent which is readily obtainable. There 
are no external auxiliaries and all wiring 
including transmission line is carried 
through standard conduit. 



EXCELLENT CONSTRUCTION 



The use of the very best materials and 

the most skillful mechanical design gives 

a fine appearance inside and out. 



NEW CIRCUITS 



Low loss inductive neutralization and a 
new high stability oscillator are among 
the many important electrical features. 



100 WATT STATIONS — Wait for announcement of the NEW 
COLLINS 100/250 WATT TRANSMITTER. 




REAR VIEW— CLOSED 




Collins Radio Company 
manufactures every type 
of transmitting apparatus. 
Microphones — Series 12 
Speech Input Systems — 
Studio Accessories — Con- 
centric Transmission Lines 
— Tower Impedance 
Matching Units — every 
component from micro- 
phone to antenna is co- 
ordinated for best per- 
formance. 




REAR VIEW— OPEN 



COLLINS RADIO COMPANY 



• CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, U. S. A. 



• NEW YORK, N. Y. 

11 West 4?nd St. 



• MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

Edificio "La Nacional" 



£6 



Radio Today 



SERVICE NOTES-RIDER 



(Continued from page 45) 



dent in figure le. Lack of symmetry 
in the response of a single peaked 
circuit is shown in figure If. A cir- 
cuit such as this offers greater re- 
sponse to the signals which constitute 
one sideband, than to the signals 
which constitute the other sideband. 
If sufficient effort is expended, the 
lack of symmetry can be established 
with meter type equipment, by, as 
stated before, noting the output re- 
sponse as the test oscillator frequency 
is shifted from the peak frequency. 
Referring to figure If, in contrast to- 
figure la, the output indication would 
decrease very rapidly, as the test fre- 
quency is increased above the peak, 
whereas it- would decrease much more 
slowly as the frequency is decreased 
below the peak. 

The shape of the curve is a deter- 
mining factor upon the band pass 
characteristics of the circuit. The 
steeper the sides and the sharper the 
peak, the more limited is the band 
of frequencies passed by the circuit, 
so that when making adjustments it 
is essential to temper to desire to se- 
cure maximum response at the peak 
with the need for most satisfactory 
response over the entire band, inclu- 
sive of the sidebands. 

Considering all that we have said, 
the paramount thing to remember, 
unless specific information is sup- 
plied to the contrary, is to secure a 
symmetrical response curve of single 
or double peak, depending upon the 
type of transformer being aligned. 

The 6C6 oscillator 

* We have been experi- 
menting with a 6C6 negative resist- 
ance oscillator, with the idea of de- 
veloping a multi-range test oscillator 
which would cover the audio, interme- 
diate, and radio frequency bands and 
which would provide sine wave out- 
put, particularly over the audio 
spectrum. The results secured with 
a 6C6 tube used as a negative resist- 
ance oscillator have been so promising 
that we hazard the statement that the 
future will see such tubes used in this 
manner in commercial test equipment. 
Not only does this type of oscillator 
develop good waveform over its entire 
band, but also it is suitable for coil 
checking or comparison, can be mod- 
ulated easily, and is extremely stable 
in addition to being extremely versa- 
tile. 

The unit being worked on consists 
of a 6C6 using the negative trans- 



conductance characteristic as an 
audio frequency oscillator; another 
6C6 operated in like fashion, but over 
the i-f. and r-f. bands and a 6D6 as 
a modulated amplifier. The voltage 
output available from the oscillators 
is ample for operation, being about 
10 to 12 volts over the audio, i-f., and 
r-f. bands up to about 4.0 megacycles. 
Linear modulation up to about 70 per 
cent is accomplished with ease, and 
since it is standard to use 30 per cent 
modulation, trouble from this angle 
is eliminated. Modulation of the car- 
rier is accomplished in the suppressor 
circuit of the amplifier tube. The 
a-f. oscillator can be used as a source 
of the a-f. signal ; it is sine wave from 
40 cycles up to about 12,000 cycles 
and is also available for use as the 
modulating voltage. 




NEGATIVE RESISTANCE APPEARS 
BETWEEN TERMINALS A"B 
R= 100.000 OHMS TO 3 MEGOHMS 
C=.OOOI TO .Ol MED. 



One of the major advantages of 
the system is the simplicity of the 
oscillating circuit, consisting of a coil 
and condenser. Whereas the average 
oscillator used for a-f. voltage genera- 
tion requires several controls in order 
to assure a sine wave output, this 
oscillator has but a single control, 
which need not be in use all the time. 
Incidentally, an iron-core line-to-line 
transformer is used over the audio 
band, yet the character of the output 
voltage wave is sine. . . . More at a 
future date. 

Tone control 

* The tone controls in 
many receivers are connected across 
one of the output tube plates and the 
ground or chassis. In the event of 
breakdown of the condenser, a direct- 
current circuit is available through the 
condenser; such a circuit arrangement 
invariably results in damage to the 
control resistor, because current, due 
to the high voltage across the re- 




READRITE METER WORKS 
Oept. RT. Bluffton. Ohio 
Gentlemen: 

Please send me more information 

Model No. 430 Model No. 431 

Model No. 354-A Catalos 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 



September, 1935 



47 




SERVICE NOTES-RIDER 



(Continued from page 47) 



COMPLETE DESIGNS 
of 10 Public Address 

AMPLIFIERS! 

A manual of cir- 
cuits of Audio 
Amplifiers. One 
for every pur- 
pose. From 3 
watts to 80 
watts. A I 1 
tried and 
tested d e- 
signs.With 
compl ete 
lists of 
parts and 
their 
values. 



FREE! 




VALUABLE 
REFERENCE BOOK 

This advertisement and 10c IX 
STAMPS, to cover mailing ex- 
penses, will bring your FREE 
copy of this valuable Reference 
Book. There is no obligation. 

STANDARD 
TRANSFORMER 
CORPORATION 

853 Blackhawk St., Chicago 



FREE -> 



RADOLEK 
DEALERS 

make the most 

PROFITS. Here is 

the Reason Why! 

£ The New Radolek 1935 Fall Edition 
of the Profit Guide is the most complete 
Radio Parts Catalog ever published — - 
new, bigger and better. Everything in 
radio — at the right prices. Over 160 
pages of valuable, money-saving "radio- 
buying" information. Over 10,000 sep- 
arate Repair Parts — hundreds of new 
items — a complete, new selection of Ra- 
dio Receivers and Amplifiers. Contains 
the most complete, exact duplicate, re- 
placement parts listings, of volume con- 
trols, condensers, transformers, vibrators 
ever compiled. Nowhere, ever, has there 
been a Radio Parts Catalog comparable 
to this superb book. Every page brings 
you extra profits. This is your book — it's 
FREE. If you want the best Radio 
Parts Catalog — if you want to give 
better service at bigger profits — then 
send for this NEW Radolek Profit Guide. 



RADOLEK restricts distribution 
of this catalog to active and legiti- 
mate Radio Men. Please enclose your 
business card or letterhead — 




THE RADOLEK CO. 

638 West Randolph Street, Chicago, III. 

Send me FREE the Big New RADOLEK 
PROFIT GUIDE 



Address 

Are you a Serviceman? □ Dealer? n Expm? D 



sistor, flows through the resistor. Re- 
placement of the condenser in exactly 
the same manner as used before in- 
vites trouble, in the event that failure 
again results. Experience shows and 
the recommendation is made by sev- 
eral receiver manufacturers that a 
preferable connection for the tone 
control circuit is across the output 
transformer primary, instead of from 
plate to chassis. 

Time and again, tone control re- 
sistors which will not be completely 
damaged have become noisy after be- 
ing subjected to the comparatively high 
current flow occasioned by the break- 
down of the tone control condenser. 
With the change in the connections 
named, breakdown of the condenser 
greatly reduces the hazards to the re- 
sistor, because the voltage applied 
across the resistor is the voltage ex- 
isting across the winding only and 
is seldom enough to damage the re- 
sistor, particularly in view of the low 
d-c resistance shunt of the winding 
itself. 

Arvin Model 7 

* In this receiver the 6F7 
is used as an r-f. amplifier, employing 
the pentode portion and the triode por- 
tion is employed as the first stage a-f. 
amplifier. This is not reflexing, since 
the tube is a dual purpose tube, con- 
sisting of a triode and a pentode por- 
tion. The cathode is common. The 
i-f. peak is 170 kc. The balance of 
the receiver employs a 6A7 as a com- 
bination mixer-oscillator, a 6B7 as an 
i-f. amplifier and half wave diode rec- 
tifier and also AVC. The output tube 
is a 41 and the power supply employs 
an 84. 

The following changes have been 
made in the receiver. A 200-ohm %- 
watt resistor has been added across 
the vibrator points in the power sup- 
ply. The grid circuit of the 6A7 
oscillator system originally employed 
a 100,000-ohm resistor. This has been 
changed to a 50,000-ohm resistor, 
rated at J4 w att. 

Oscillators in 
superheterodyne receivers 

* Time and again, serv- 
icemen attempt to increase the signal 
output of a superheterodyne receiver 
by increasing the operating voltages 
applied to the oscillator tube. This 
change is intended to increase the am- 
plitude of the local oscillations fed 



into the mixer tube, and thereby in- 
crease the amplitude of the resultant 
signal and total receiver output. 

Such an increase in operating volt- 
age is beneficial only if the output 
of the receiver oscillator is insuffi- 
cient. However, if the output of the 
oscillator is sufficient, further in- 
crease will have no beneficial effects. 
The reason for this is that in hetero- 
dyne operation, the level or amplitude 
of the resultant signal is a function 
of the weaker of the two mixed sig- 
nals and not of the stronger. The re- 
sultant output signal has an ampli- 
tude nearly proportional to the ampli- 
tude of the weaker signal. 

It has been found that if the locally 
generated signal level is increased 
from equality, to several times the 
level of the incoming carrier, the in- 
crease in resultant voltage is less than 
20 per cent. At the same time, there 
exists the possibility of overloading of 
the mixer tube, with consequent dis- 
tortion. Considering all factors, such 
a change is not worth while. 

New metal tube sets 

* Highlights, pertaining 
to circuit design of the new metal 
sets, as relating to service data, will 
be considered next month. 

NEW BOOKS 

"The Story of Radio" 
By Orrin E. Dunlap, Jr. 

* ORRIN E. DTJNLAP, Jr., 

radio editor of the New York Times, 
authors a new edition of "The Story 
of Radio," first brought out in 1927. 
Current edition reviews the history 
of radio from early experiments to 
the present status of facsimile and 
television. Okay for anyone wanting 
radio in a nutshell available for 
quick reference. 

Book's best feature is readability. 
Written as though "Radio," personi- 
fied, is telling its own life story. 
Nice idea. Gives facts like dates 
and places with much less than the 
usual dryness. Well worth the $2.75 
if you are at all interested in the de- 
velopment of radio as a science and 
a business. New chapters on recent 
experiments especially notable. Pub- 
lished by The Dial Press, New York 
City, 1935. Price $2.75. — Radio 
Today 



48 



Radio Today 




"The Standard of the Industry" 

THE 

Super 'Sensitive 
ARMORED 
DYNAMIC 

IS THE 

1936 SPEAKER 

Representatives 

Mr. C. A. Stone, 

c/o Carl A. Stone Co., Ltd., 

209 West Seventeenth Street. 

Los Angeles, California 

Mr. George D. Norrls, 
303 East Pike Street, 
Seattle, Washington 

Mr. O. A. Huber, 

30 Ninth Street, 

San Franeisco, California 

Mr. James C. Pope, Jr., 

3037 Knox Avenue, South, 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 

QUAM-NICHOLS CO. 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 
1674 Broadway, New York City 



NEW! FREE WITH 
NATIONAL UNION RADIO TUBES 

3 TESTERS INI 



This remarkable instrument Is the latest de- 
velopment of the Apparatus Design Com- 
pany, famous makers of Confidence instru- 
ments. You can own it the easy National 
Union way, the way in which more than 
21,000 dealers have obtained the finest in- 
struments built. It costs you nothing. You 
make a small deposit which is rebated when 
tube purchases are completed. Get details. 



1. TESTS ALL TUBES 



(Including new metal types) 



2. TESTS VIBRATORS 



(Tests all types as easily as test- 
ing tubes. Saves buying separate 
tester.) 



3. TESTS CONDENSERS 



(Tests leaks, opens, shorts in elec- 
trolytic, mica and ignition con- 
densers.) 



instrument at a ft S.OO deposit. 
This deposit advances OCT. 25th/ 



National Union Radio Corporation of N. Y. 
570 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y 

How can I get the new 3 in 1 tester? 
Name 



Street. 
City_ 



_State_ 



TRADE NEWS 



* Roy Erlandson, identi- 
fied with the radio and music indus- 
tries for the past 16 years, is now 
sales manager of the Rudolph Wur- 
litzer Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and will be in direct charge of all 
sales activities of the branch stores 
operated by this company in various 
cities throughout the country. 

* Henry Forster, one of 
the most popular sales executives in 
the radio industry, promises to have 
some very interesting news for his 
friends in the very near future. At 
the present time, Mr. Forster is mak- 
ing his headquarters at 1307 South 
Michigan Avenue, Chicago, HI. 

* There was recently 
formed in New York City a new 
company known as the Exporters of 
America, Inc., which has established 
offices at 330 West 42nd Street. H. A. 
Sillcox, who has been in the export 
field for many years, is head of this 
new organization which will be in 
charge of the export activities of a 
number of well-known companies in- 
cluding Sentinel Radio Corp., manu- 
facturing transformers and electrical 



+ V. A. Searles, formerly 
advertising manager of the Sparks- 
Withington Company for many years 
and one of the most capable adver- 
tising executives in the radio indus- 
try, is now in charge of advertising 
and sales promotion for the Inter- 
national Radio Corp., Ann Arbor, 
Mich., manufacturer of Kadette radio 
sets. 

* In Lynchburg, Va., 
Mayor Lewis E. Lichford had GE in- 
stall a 250-watt transmitter and a 
receiver at police headquarters, as 
well as 7 receivers in police cars. 
The system is a one-way, medium- 
high-frequency affair which will also 
be used by the state police. 

* Jack Scanlan, former 
sales manager of the Muter Co., has 
been appointed general sales man- 
ager for Utah Products Co., makers 
of loud speakers, cabinets, and radio 
parts. 

* About 200 dealers 
from southern Mississippi and Lousi- 
ana hurried into New Orleans on 
August 16 at the invitation of the 
Interstate Electric Co. Crosley's 



I dfe^-(m4twitmn> I 



Headquarters jor Quality Radio 
Sets at Low Prices 

Capitalize on this world renown I 
name, which has always been 

associated with the highest § 
quality types of radio sets. 

Now you can sell "Freed-Eis-i- | 

mann" sets to your trade at popu- =_ 

lar prices, within the reach of all. § 

This new line has everything § 

| needed in popular priced radio to | 

! help you do a substantial business m. 

\ at a good profit. 5- to 10-tube i 

Superheterodyne models — Foreign | 

I Short Wave, Police and Broadcast § 

bands. 

PRIVATE BRAND SETS 

A complete line of TRF sets for I 

sales and promotional purposes g 

to fill the need for low priced I 
leaders and round out a complete 

line. Single band and two-band 1 

sets attractively styled. Exclu- § 

sive cabinet designs and brand g 

names for quantity buyers. Busl- 1 

ness solicited from small as well =. 
as large accounts — export busi- 
ness also invited. 

Write at once for details and i 
prices. 

| Licensed under RCA and Hazelllne patents § 

| FREED MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. | 

127 W. 17th St. New York. U.S.A. | 

Phone? CHelsea .3-1717 Cable: RADIOFREED j 



Capautote 




WET- 
DRY 
PAPER 
MICA 
TRIMMER 



JbdUoMi. ■■■ 

m- zvthy- ciimcde. 
tkcouahout/' 

UurWoddQ 



WHEN IN NEED OF 
GOOD CONDENSERS- 
SPECIFY THE BEST 

Literature on rei 

SOLAR MFG. CORP. 

599-601 Broadway 
New York City 



September, 1935 



49 




Tear out this cwTand 

pin to yauj^detter- 

F$t£ copy 

tfthe NEW UTAH 
General Catalog of 
vitalized radio parts 

AH RADIO PRODUCTS CO., Orleans St., Chicago 



LEADERS ON PARADE 



vC >\- AN o 



GRAND CENTRAL 
PALACE 

NEW YORK 




18th to 28th, 1935 

Daily, including Sunday 
II A.M. to II P.M. 



«*W** 



We publish, with pride, the names of the exhibitors who will be represented 

at the forthcoming National Electrical and Radio Exposition to be held at 

Grand Central Palace, September 18th to 28th inclusive. 



Air-King Products Co., Inc. 
Allen-lngraham, Inc. 
Apex Rotarex Corporation 
Atwater Kent Mfg. Co. 
Brooklyn Edison Company, Inc. 
Bushwick-McPhilben Corp. 

(Sparks Withington Corp.) 
Century Products Co. of N. Y., Inc. 
Chicago Flexible Shaft Co. 
Rex Cole, Inc. 
Crosley Distributing Corp. 
Davega-City Radio, Inc. 
Electrical Testing Laboratories 
Emerson Radio & Phonograph Corp. 
Eureka Vacuum Cleaner Co., Inc. 
Fada Radio and Electric Co. 
The Fay Company 
Ferguson Radio Corp. 
Frigidaire Corporation 

General Electric Co. (Air Conditioning Dept.) 
General Electric Co. 

(Atlantic Division, Incandescent Lamp Dept.) 
General Electric Co. (Merchandise Dept.) 
General Electric Supply Corp. 
General Household Utilities Co. 
Gernsback Publications, Inc. 
Graybar Electric Co., Inc. 
Grolier Society of London 
The Hoover Company 
House Furnishing Review 
Kelvinator Corp. (Air Conditioning) 
Kelvinator Corp. (Refrigeration) 
Landers, Frary & Clark 



E. B. Latham & Co. (Leonard Refrigerator) 

A. J. Lindemann & Hoverson Co. 

McGraw Hill Publishing Co. 

R. H. McMann, Inc. 

New York and Queens Electric Light and 

Power Co. 
The New York Edison Co., Inc. 
Petroleum Heat & Power Company 
Philco Radio & Television Corp., of N. Y. 
Pierce Airo, Inc. 
Pilot Radio Corp. 

Premier Division, Electric Vacuum Cleaner Co. 
Proctor & Schwartz Electric Co. 
"Radio" 

Radio & Electric Appliance Journal 
Radio Today 

The Radiobar Co. of America 
R. C A. Mfg. Co., Inc. 
Royal Eastern Electrical Supply Co. 
Singer Sewing Machine Co., Inc. 
Stewart Warner Company 
Stromberg-Carlson Telephone Mfg. Co. 
Superior Cabinet Corporation 
Times Appliance Company, Inc. 
United American Bosch Corp. 
Warren-Norge Company, Inc. 
Warren Telechron Co. 
Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co. 
Westinghouse Lamp Co. 
Westinghouse Electric Supply Co. 
E. A. Wildermuth 
Zenith Radio Corporation 



NATIONAL 
ELECTRICAL AND RADIO EXPOSITION 

Sponsored by the Electrical Association of New York, Inc. 



sales manager, H. E. Biebardson, pre- 
sented the new Crosley line with a 
nourish, and the southern district 
sales manager, George H. Lasley, 
made further remarks. Two Inter- 
state executives, 0. G. H. Easch and 
Percival Stern, talked about credit, 
club-pay plans, and Crosley history. 

* New headquarters for 
the ' United Appliance Corp., Fort 
Worth, Texas, have been opened for 
radio distribution in 95 counties of 
North Texas. The new offices are in 
charge of Harry B. Savage and Tom 
E. McBeath. 

* A. G. Manke is a new- 
comer to the staff of General House- 
hold Utilities Corp. of Chicago. He 
was previously with Pilot Eadio and 
Tube Corp. 

* J. F. Weldon, export 
manager for Atwater Kent, will soon 
have new merchandising plans com- 
pleted for the new AK line abroad. 
Weldon left late last month for Eu- 
rope, North Africa, and Asia Minor. 

* Frank Zahner, globe 
trotter, fiction and radio writer, has 
been picked for sales promotion man- 
ager of the radio division of Krich- 
Radisco, Inc., Newark, N. J. 

* W. S. Eice, owner of 
a chain of music stores in South 
Carolina, which also goes in for tops 
radio lines, had added another outlet 
to the string with the opening of his 
new shop at 1318 Main Street in 
Columbia, S. C. 

* A Southern California 
group of distributor-executives, bear- 
ing the quaint tag of "Eadio Booster 
Club," elected officers recently at 
Branch No. 1, Los Angeles. Score: 
J. T. Hill, president; J. J. Perlmuth, 
vice-president ; Harry A. Lasure, 
secretary-treasurer; Carl Stone and 
Don Wallace, board members. 

* National Union Eadio 
Corp., headed by S. W. Muldowny, 
has announced appointment of F. J. 
Wessner as general sales manager to 
follow H. A. Hutchins, gone to the 
advertising field. Wessner has been 
with National Union since its start 
in 1929. 

* The Electric Lamp and 
Supply Co., St. Louis, has been ap- 
pointed distributor in the St. Louis 
territory for Stewart- Warner radios. 
H. S. Hollander, Electric Lamp head, 
recently took his entire sales force 
to the Stewart-Warner convention in 
Chicago. 



50 



Radio Today 



NEW THINGS FROM THE MANUFACTURERS 

Complete listing of Fall model radios on pages 36, 37 and 39 



DIRECT-READING TUBE TESTER 

* Tests both metal and 
glass tubes — direct-reading scale. Ap- 
plies proper load values — indicates 
leakages and shorts. Four simple op- 
erations required. Meter protected 
against drainage — A.C. meter for line 
voltage adjustment. Attractive oak 
case. Model 430 — net price $18. Read- 
rite Meter Works, BluTfton, Ohio — 
Radio Today 



ALL-WAVE TEST OSCILLATOR 




* Test oscillator for sev- 
iceman — range from 100 to 22,000 kc. 
Special attenuator — constant output 
impedance of 200 ohms — minimum sig- 
nal below one microvolt and maximum 
of 0.2-volt. Plug-in coils — uniform out- 
put over each band — new ranges can 
be added. Battery operated — self con- 
tained — triple shielded. Weight 12j4 
pounds. Model 692— list price $85. 
Weston Electrical Instrument Corp., 
814 Frelinghuysen Ave., Newark, N. J. 
— Radio Today 



RESISTANCE BRIDGE 




■*■ Accurate Wheatstone- 
type resistance bridge at moderate 
price. Simple in operation. Unusual 
electrical ruggedness. Unique internal 
construction — resistor elements wound 
on tapped strips. Taps set to extreme 
accuracy. Vacuum-impregnated — no 
variations from humidity. Holds cali- 
bration. Alloy resistance wire main- 
tains constant resistance with reason- 
able changes in lemperature. Net 
price $29.70. Muter Co., Chicago, 111 — 
Radio Today 



OIL-FILLED CONDENSERS 

* Hermetically sealed, oil- 
filled condensers rated at 1,000 volts 
D.C. Non-inductive. Suitable for high- 
voltage amplifiers and transceivers. 
Only 2 in. high by 1 in. square. Cased 
in metal can. Available in .05, .1, .25, 
.5 mfd. List price $1.65 to $2.00. Cor- 
nell-Dublier Corp., 4377 Bronx Blvd., 
New York City. — Radio Today' 



HIGH-FIDELITY AMPLIFIER 

+ Amplifier for public ad- 
dress. Undistorted output of 11 watts 
— maximum of 20 watts — gain of 108 
db. Separate high and low frequency 
variable attenuators. High-fidelity 
speaker system with two low-frequency 
and a high-frequency tweeter — field 
supply and speaker filter separate from 
amplifier. Overall characteristic of 
amplifier and speaker essentially flat 
to 10,000 cycles. Amplifier and 
speakers — list $425. Pacent Engineer- 
ing Corp., 79 Madison Ave., New York 
City — Radio Today 



METAL TUBE ADAPTERS 

DUAL GRID STUD- 



* Kit of adapters and an- 
alyzer plug for modernizing test equip- 
ment — handles metal and glass tubes. 
Dual grid stud for glass and metal 
tube cap clips — 5-foot 9-wire cable. List 
price $5.35. Alden Products Co., 
Brockton, Mass. — Radio Today 



SHORT-WAVE SUPER 

+ Short-wave superhetero- 
dyne with band switching from 9 to 
175 meters. Two tuned r.f. stages on 
all bands. Calibrated band-spread dial. 
Iron-cored i.f. transformers. Crystal 
filter for signal — signal c.w. reception. 
Better than 1 microvolt sensitivity — 
ten tubes. Tuning and sensitivity me- 
ter. Available in kit or assembled. 
Model 5D — net price $114 complete. 
McMurdo Silver Corp., 3354 N. Paulina 
St., Chicago, 111. — Radio Today 



WIDE-RANGE TRANSFORMERS 

* Extremely wide-range 
transformers— 35 to 225,000 cycles — 2 
decibel variation. High-permeability 
nickel-iron core. Cased in cast alu- 
minum. Employed with balanced 




push-pull tube circuits. Useful for tel- 
evision and wide-range sound. Avail- 
able in three models — line to push-pull 
grids (741-G), push-pull interstage 
(741-J), push-pull plates to line (741- 
P). Price $22.50. General Radio Co., 
30 State St., Cambridge, Mass. — Radio 
Today 



HIGH-FREQUENCY 
PRE-SELECTOR 




+ Two-stage radio fre- 
quency amplifier for use ahead of 
short-wave receiver. Increases signal 
strength — reduces atmospheric and 
tube noises, relatively. Coil switch- 
ing mechanism — range from 12 to 200 
meters. Antenna switched from pre- 
selector to receiver without discon- 
necting leads. Housed in metal cab- 
inet. Model 302 — available in kit or 
wired. J. W. Miller Co., 5917 So. Main 
St., Los Angeles, Cal. — Radio Today 



BEAT OSCILLATOR 




* Beat oscillator for use 
with short-wave superheterodyne — 
produces audible beat note in speaker. 
Used for reception of c.w. code sig- 
nals — or tuning by "birdie" or whistle 
method. Range of 415 to 700 kc. Ver- 
nier adjustment for controlling pitch. 
Electron-coupled oscillator for fre- 
quency stability. Used with practi- 
cally any radio. Power supply from 
receiver. 7 x 2y A in. base x 7 in. List 
price — $7.50. RCA Mfg. Co., Camden, 
N. J. — Radio Today 

{Please turn to -page 53) 



September, 1935 



51 



ms»«5 




• For some time we have been supplying the 
requirements of leading set manufacturers 
with a complete line of Metal Tubes for 
original equipment. 

Beginning September 3, several thousand 
tubes a day have been shipped against orders 
from leading jobbers for replacement pur- 
poses. These shipments have been made up 
of balanced quantities of all types now being 
used as original equipment. 

Our success with the new metal tubes has 
enhanced the position which we have held for 
over three years as the largest supplier of glass 
tubes for original equipment. 

Inquiries regarding tubes for original equip- 
ment will be promptly answered if addressed 
to our New York Office at 500 Fifth Avenue. 

Jobbers, take no chances — carry SYLVANIA 
tubes and be ready to take care of your trade ! 

Dealers and service men will profit by dealing 
thru a SYLVANIA jobber. Communicate 
with our factory for FREE Technical Supple- 
ment on the new metal tubes. Address 
Hygrade Sylvania Corporation, Dept. J-l, 
Emporium, Penna. 

SYLVANIA 

THE SET-TESTED RADIO TUBE 

© 1935, Hygrade Sylvania Corp. 




THE 
STOLEN 
DOLLARS 
YOU WALL 
NEVER SEE 



Any failure of operation in a ra- 
dio set, no matter how small, 
means 100% failure. The receiver 
sold or repaired yesterday and 
found faulty today will cause loss 
of countless dollars in good will 
to the serviceman, dealer, and 
manufacturer. 

"Radio - set users want, above 
all else, dependability. Inquiries 
among - lay listeners show that 
whatever their interest in tone 
quality, sensitivity, or other re- 
finements, they put above every- 
thing the matter of continuity of 
operation and freedom from ser- 
vice calls." - - - - Electronics. 
So read an editorial in one of the leading engineering magazines 
CORNELL-DUBILIER condensers are specified on 
government blueprints, used by all large broadcasting 
stations and demanded by engineers of the largest 
radio set and apparatus manufacturers in the country. 
This nation-wide acceptance is ample proof of C-D 
QUALITY and DEPENDABILITY. 
Assure yourself of customer satisfaction and a profit 
by using CORNELL-DUBILIER electrolytic, 
paper, oil and mica condensers. 
Your Inquiries Are Appreciated 



C OR N E LL-DUBILIE R 

C O R ' P O R '.v. A T.I O. N 

• 

4360 BRONX BOULEVARD 
NEW YORK 




/MUTER Interf* 



wterence Hirers 

■T-n. „ 



=£ 



c ^ 



C.i 



~ManMade 



interference/ 



jjjPW^ A Radio absolutely elimi- 

© nates the man-made interference that 
I comes in over the power line by merely 
attaching the Filter directly to the set itself. 
Sell these filters with confidence and guarantee 
their operation, because they will do the job. 
There's a real need for them. Write Dept. T-9. 

Ask your jobber or take advantage of our trial offer. 

MAIL THIS COUPON 

THE MUTER COMPANY 

1255 South Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 

Please ship me one Muter Interference 
Filter at your trial offer of $1.80 ($3.00 list, 
less 40%). 

Name 

Address 

City Sta 




52 



Radio Today 



NEW THINGS 

(Continued from page 51). 



WIND BATTERY CHARGER 

* Generator driven by 
wind power. Employs 5%-foot pro- 
peller to utilize low winds. Charge 
6-volt storage batteries. Also has ca- 
pacity to light several rooms. Mounts 
atop any high building. Rugged and 
efficient construction claimed. Zephyr 
Power Co., Dodge and 11th, Omaha, 
Neb. — Radio Today 



SECTIONAL CABINETS 

* Sectional wooden cabi- 
nets suitable for storing small parts. 
Available with 2y 2 in. or 55^ in. high 
drawers — two rows of former inter- 
changeable with latter through use of 
removable cross partition. Sections 
23j^ in. wide x 15 in. deep x 27 in. 
high. Two, four, or six drawers to a 
shelf. Exterior of white oak in me- 
dium finish. Model 1740— price $27.10. 
J. D. "Warren Mfg. Co., Montpelier. 
Ohio. — Radio Today 



LOW OHM CARBON RESISTORS 

* Carbon resistors as low 
as 0.04 qhms — power ratings from % 
to 10 watts — type LV. Withstand hu- 
midity conditions much more severe 
than specified by R.M.A. Conform to 
same standards of life, voltage, load, 
and overload characteristics set by reg- 
ular Ohiohm resistors. Ohio Carbon 
Co., Lakewood, Ohio — Radio Today 



STORAGE CABINETS 

* Handy storage cabinets 
for parts — 9^4x2 1 /ix4;/ inches. Can be 
stacked to fit any available space. Ob- 
tained free with purchase of condenser 
kits. Tobe Deutschmann Corp., Can- 
ton, Mass. — Radio Today 



VELOCITY MICROPHONE 







* Midget high-impedance 
velocity microphone. Hangs from 
shoulders — always correct distance 
from mouth. Output constant within 
1 db. with speaker's head in any direc- 
tion. Excellent for lecturers and din- 
ner speakers. Size of match box — 
weighs eight ounces. High-level and 
high-impedance eliminates need of sep- 
arate pre-amplifier — works directly into 
grid of amplifier tube. Amperite 
Corp., 561 Broadway, New York City. 
— Radio Today 

CRYSTAL MICROPHONE 

+ Diaphragm-type crystal 
microphone, designed for communica- 



tions service in airways, police, and 
amateur radiophone systems. Linearly 
increasing response of 20 db. from 60 
to 2,000 cycles and flat from 2,000 to 
4,000 followed by gradual cut-off. Ris- 
ing characteristic said to attenuate 
low frequencies, preventing overload 
— effective side-band power doubled. 
Model 70S— Shure Brothers Co., 215 
W. Huron St., Chicago, 111.— Radio 
Today 



HIGH OHMAGE RESISTORS 

* Three-watt carbonized 
resistors — 100 ohms to 100 megohms. 
Low temperatu r e coefficient of 
-0.0003/°C. Absolutely noiseless in op- 
eration — non-hydroscopic coating of 
lacquer for moisture-proofing. Resist- 
ance permanent with age — independent 
of voltage. Suitable for use in photo- 
cell circuits and high-quality ampli- 
fiers. Precision units available for use 
as meter mirltipliers. Three-watt 40 
megohms — list price $.90. Morrill and 
Morrill, 30 Church St., New York City 
— Radio Today 



SOCKET FOR ACORN TUBES 




* Special extruded isolan- 
tite socket for ultra-high-frequency 
acorn-type tubes, 954 and 955. Only 
\'/ % inch in diameter. Has alignment 
plug to insure proper insertion of tube. 
Tops and sides glazed for high surface 
resistivity. Terminals recessed on one 
side, permitting flat mounting to metal 
shield, thereby reducing interstage 
coupling. Hammarlund Mfg. Co., 424 
W. 33rd St., New York City— Radio 
Today 



ALL-WAVE ANTENNA KIT 




■*• Antenna kit comprising 
doublet aerial with twisted-pair lead- 
in, antenna coupler, and receiver cou- 
pler. All connections factory-wired 
and soldered — ready for installation 
with necessary insulators. Said to be 
highly efficient on broadcast waves and 
on short-wave broadcast bands — back- 
ground noise reduced to absolute mini- 
mum. List price $6.75. Technical Ap- 
pliance Corp., Long Island City, N. Y 
— Radio Today 



NOISE SUPPRESSORS 

* Complete line of noise 
eliminators for use with receiver or 
appliances. Extremely compact. Eas- 
ily installed — between outlet and line 
plug with grounded lead. Model RN 
especially effective at frequencies from 
150 to 20,000 kilocycles— sectional 
band-suppression construction — capac- 
ity of 3 amperes. Other models of both 
capacitive and capacitive-inductive 
types available from $.40 up. Model 
RN — list price $5. Solar Mfg. Corp., 
599 Broadway, New York City. — Radio 
Today 



SPACE-SAVER CONDENSERS 




■*• Midget electrolytic con- 
densers for ultra-compact receivers. 
Available from 2-16 mfd. in 200- and 
450-volt ratings. No sacrifice in serv- 
ice life. Popular where space is at 
premium or for replacing old con- 
densers with greater capacity or higher 
working voltage. Size of 8 mfd., 450- 
volt— 2 7/16 x 1% x 11/16 inches. Aero- 
vox Corp., Brooklyn, N. Y. — Radio To- 
day 



PHONOGRAPH-AMPLIFIER 

* Portable three-stage 
amplifier for AC-DC. Output of over 
five watts. Special hum balancing 
circuit permits use of push-pull type 
48's on A.C. Electric turntable takes 
16-inch records. Crystal type pick-up. 
Eight-inch dynamic speaker separate 
from turnable and amplifier. Addi- 
tion of microphone allows for use as 
public address system. List price 
$89.50. Ansley Radio Corp., 240 West 
23rd St., New York City.— Radio To- 
day 



DYNAMIC MICROPHONE 

* High-grade pick-up from 
40 to 10,000 cycles, without regard to 
direction of sound approach. Applica- 
tion of modern acoustic streamline 
principles results in uniform response 
both with respect to frequency and 
angle of incidence of sound wave. Has 
desirable features of ordinary dynamic 
microphone but small in size (2% 
diameter) and lightweight. Used with 
existing speech equipment at distances 
of several hundred feet. Graybar 
Electric Co., New York City — Radio 
Today 



September, 1935 



53 




Ourtype"H" 40 watt 
Mica Card units have 
been subjected, in lab- 
oratory tests, to loads 
up to 120 wat f s with- 
out injury. Size 1J4" 
wide, 334" long by 
3^" thick. Theirunique 
construction suggests 
many uses. 



200% Overload Without Injury 

with MICROHM 

MICA CARD RESISTORS 

Write for further information and our new catalog. 

PRECISION RESISTOR COMPANY 

334 Badger Avenue - - - Newark, N. J. 

0Tfl1(Sl3®MO 



WIRE WOUND RESISTORS 



lay's 



Radio Tad* 

BOOK SHOP 



FOR the convenience of our readers in obtaining Radio Books, we 
offer the services of this department. Outstanding Radio Books 
will be advertised monthly. These are available to you at the prices 
listed. No charge will be made for wrapping and mailing. Should 
you desire a book that we have not yet advertised, and the price of 
which you do not know, just send $5 with your order and we will 
return the correct balance, or communicate with you if the list price 
exceeds that amount. 

Address : 

BOOK SHOP, RADIO TODAY 

480 Lexington Avenue, Xew York, X. Y. 



Radio Trouble Shooting, by E. R. Haan. 
Takes the guess work out of Radio. Shows the 
service man quickly and efficiently exactly what 
is wrong with an inefficient set and how to correct 
the trouble. 32S pages, over 300 illustrations.$3.00 
The Outlook for Television, by Orrin E. 
Dunlap, Jr. In this volume a leading student of 
broadcasting and television gives you the latest 
information on the subject and offers, in addition, 
the ideas of eight foremost authorities on the 
value of television in their individual fields.. §4.00 
The Advertising Agency Looks at 
Radio, Edited by Neville O'Neill. Get the 
first detailed and comprehensive statement of the 
Advertising Agencies' point of view on Radio 

from IS experts. 248 pages $3.00 

SOS to the Rescue, by Karl Raarslag. Th - 
stirring narrations of great sea disasters and 
rescues — such as the "Titanic" — "Vestris" — 
"Morro Castle" — all from the Radio Operators' 

viewpoint. 16 illustrations $2.50 

Loud Speakers — Theory, Performance, Test- 
ing, and Design, by N. W. McLachlan. Fully 
equipped with tables of experimental data. 1G0- 
line diagrams and photographs $13.30 

Elements of Loud Speaker Practice, 

by N. W. McLachlan. A small, practical manual. 
Covers the entire field of practice excepting some 
theoretical and advanced aspects, illustrated with 
simple diagrams $1.75 

Experimental Radio, by Prof. R. R. Ram- 
sey. Revised Edition. Comprises 12S experiments 
229 pages, 150 illustrations $2.73 

The Fundamentals of Radio, by Prof. R. 
R. Ramsey. New Second Edition. Revised. En- 
larged. An up-to-date, authoritative, exposition 
of the principles underlying the many phases of 
Radio. 426 pages, well illustrated $3.50 

Your Invention — How to Protect and Mer- 
chandise It, by Elmore B. Lyford. Plain facts 
on Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights. Explains 
how to completely protect your ideas — and how 
to patent them. Includes 24 legal forms 210 pages 
bound in cloth $1.50 

Applied Acoustics, by Harry F. Olson, and 
Frank Massa. A textbook and reference manual 
covering the theoretical and experimental aspects 
of electro-acoustical systems. The first American 
book dealing entirely with acoustical engineering 
principles. 430 pages, 228 illustrations. . .$4.50 



Radio Physics Course, by Alfred A. Ghi- 
rardi. 2nd Revised Edition. Basic electrical 
theory pertaining to the latest applications. Used 
the world over as a valuable reference and text 
book. Nearly 1,000 pages. 500 diagrams and 

illustrations $4.00 

Aircraft Radio, by Myron F. Eddy. A com- 
plete guide to the principles, selection, installa- 
tion, operation, and maintenance of Aircraft Radio 
284 pages, 68 diagrams and illustrations . . $3.00 
Principles of Radio Communication, 
by John H. Morecroft. Completely revised to con- 
form with modern developments of the art and 
science of Radio. One of the recognized stand- 
ards on theory. 1,084 pages. Cloth $7.50 

Elements of Radio Communication. 

by John H. Morecroft. Contains more simplified 
material than the "Principles of Radio Communi- 
cation, by the same author. Not a condensed edi- 
tion of the "Principles," but an entirely new 
and independently written volume. 286 pages. 

' loth $3.00 

Experimental Radio Engineering. 
by John H. Morecroft. 51 experiments covering 
the entire range of Radio. 345 pages. Cloth. 

$3.50 
Principles of Radio, by Keith Henney, In 
tended primarily for radio students, experimenters, 
and technicians — this book covers a wide range 
of subjects from the fundamentals of electricity 
to the modern concepts of modulation and detec- 
tion. Well illustrated. Practical. 491 pages 

Cloth $3.30 

Radio Round the World, by A. W. Has- 
lett. Tells what wireless waves are. How they 
travel round the world ; and how the sun helps 
them on their way. Their world-wide applica- 
tions in television, medicine and communication. 

192 pages $1.75 

The Rise of Radio — The Electric Word, by 
Paul Schubert. An interesting narrative of the 
rise of radio, and how the interplay of science, 
business, politics and diplomacy have accompanied 

its development. 311 pages $2.50 

The Story of Radio, by Orrin E. D-unlap, 
Jr New, revised, enlarged edition. 32 illustra- 
tions. The recent strides in television, photo- 
radio, ultra-short waves, and in radio applications 
in man's fight against body ailments have led to 
this expansion of The Story of Radio, which 
should be on your bookshelf $2.75 



Order Your Radio Books From 

BOOK SHOP, RADIO TODAY 

480 LEXINGTON AVENUE NEW YORK, N. Y. 



ELECTRONICS 

"Frequency-modulation" 
on 7-meter band 

* Signs of a coming 
revolution in the broadcasting art — 
if broadcasting goes to the ultra- 
short waves — are now clearly visible 
to some engineers who have examined 
Major E. PI. Armstrong's wide-band 
"frequency-modulation" system. This 
system, which is operating between 
the Empire State Building in New 
York and Haddonfield, X. J., near 
Camden, is giving a better signal in 
Haddonfield than the 50 kw. New 
York stations. 

The superiority in freedom from 
static and tube noise and the entire 
absence of selective side band fading 
at a distance well beyond the fading 
zone, have been demonstrated re- 
peatedly during a summer which has 
been marked by thunderstorms of 
great severity. On numerous occa- 
sions it has been shown that the 2 kw. 
7-meter Empire State signal is far 
better than the high-power Philadel- 
phia stations. 

The new system employs frequency 
shifts as wide as 60 kilocycles. 

The overall frequency character- 
istic of the transmitter and receiver 
is declared to be flat from 30 to 
20,000 cycles, which accounts for the 
high fidelity of the transmission. 
The system is being successfully used 
for multiplex transmission of pro- 
grams. 

Electronic bull's-eye for 
Lake Placid gunners 

* When the Statewide 
Rod and Gun Club meets at Lake 
Placid, K". Y., in mid-September, a 
new photo-electric "gun" that shoots 
light instead of bullets, will be dem- 
onstrated. In the target is a photo- 
electric cell, or "electric eye." When 
the trigger is pulled, a focussed light 
in the gun-barrel flashes momentarily. 
If the light-beam is aimed at the 
photo-cell bull's-eye at that instant, 
the photo-cell records a hit, sending 
its own faint electronic impulse 
through amplifiers to ring the gong. 
At the same time a big red light is 
switched on with each bull's-eye rung 
up. 

Similar photo-electric targets have 
been tested out by U.S. Army officials 
in an effort to develop a gun for 
target practice that requires no am- 
munition and will save Uncle Sam's 
money. 



54 



Radio Today 



Surpassingly Beautiful Cabinets 
Broadcast, Police, World-Wide Ranges Pace-Setting Values and Performance 




MODEL, 610SA — 3 bands — 18 to 560 
meters — 6-tube AC superheterodyne 
receiver. 

Licensed by 
RCA-Hazeltine-Latour 




MODEL (U2SA — foreign and broad- 
cast — AC/DC superheterodyne re- 
ceiver — 17-55, ISO to 560 meters. 
A complete line of popular priced 
leaders, including: consoles, from 
$17.95 to $95.00. All models also 
available for European 2000 meter 
band. Select territories open. 

PIERCE-AIRO, INC. 

518 Sixth Avenue New York City 

MAKERS OF FINE RADIO RECEIVERS SINCE r 




MODEL 510B — o-tube, AC 
heterodyne hi-gain receiver — 
560 meters. 



See us at Booth 13, 
Grand Central Palace 




his latest book, "THE CATHODE 
brings these developments within the reach 
Whether you are the dealer sell- There 
ing to the serviceman or the ser- 
viceman repairing equipment — 
the importance of the proper 
tools — the importance of the 
proper information concerning the 
equipment you are selling or re- 
pairing, has long been acknowl- 
edged. 

RIDER, through many years of 
association with the dealer and ser- 
viceman, is thoroughly familiar 

with the needs and requirements 
of the field. 



The development of the cath- 
ode ray tube has opened a 
tremendous field with its ap- 
plications and uses for test 
equipment and tuning appa- 
ratus. RIDER, in introducing 
RAY TUBE AT WORK," 
of every serviceman, 
no manuals or books 
available today that so completely 
fill the serviceman's requirements 
of important circuit and equip- 
ment data. To be properly 
equipped you require RIDER'S 
Vols. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. His 
"SERVICING SUPER-HETS" 
is an encyclopaedia by itself, of 
information on this all-important 
circuit. 



"THE CATHODE RAY TUBE 
AT WORK" is now on your 
jobbers' shelves. Check these 
books and get the copies you re- 
quire today. 



Your standing as a business man in the radio field, or as a 
technician will certainly be strengthened by RIDER'S books 



"The Cathode 

Ray Tube 

At Work" 

320 pages 6x9 

$2.50 Postpaid 




1440 BROADWAY • NEW YORK 



feNGERTONEJxc. 

d Electric -Music 




(Enables broadcast 






artist, advertiser, or 






station to obtain a 






noise-free, high 






fidelity record of 






any performance 






at a moderate cost. 






1 






f\ ANGERTONE 

[^ ecording equipment 
|\ecords 




NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 



September, 1935 



55 



RADIO TOMORROW 

Industry leaders see bright skies ahead 



* The usual ballyhoo 
about "the biggest season in radio 
since 1928" is heard on all sides. The 
unusual point is that this year it 
seems to be true. 

Basic business indices (steel and 
iron production, construction con- 
tracts, electric power consumption, 
commodity prices) all show 20 to 100 
per cent gains over this time last 
year. Basis for substantial increases 
in radio sales this Fall and Winter 
are laid on a sound foundation of def- 
inite improvement in buying power. 
Whether the public spends it for 
radio or something else would seem 
to be strictly up to the radio trade 
itself. 

So far as the season immediately 
ahead is concerned, radio manufac- 
turers, dealers and jobbers are plan- 
ning on getting at least a 15 or 20 
per cent greater volume than last 
year. Whoop-te-do about "beat last 
year" and "the best season in our his- 
tory" at last seems to have a pretty 
good chance of becoming a reality — 
the Ethiopian in the Italian cabinet 
is mentioned above — will radio man- 
ufacturers, jobbers and dealers follow 
through to see that radio gets first 
whack at the somewhat looser purse- 
strings? 

"INCREASE BASED OX SOUND 

PRINCIPLES" 
Leslie F. Muter, President, Radio 

Manufacturers Association; 

President, The Muter Co., 

Chicago. 
Every indication points to the 
largest radio year in our history, 
which is based on the following 
sound principles: 

1. The quality and prices of the new 
lines are better than ever; 

2. The all-wave features are reviv- 
ing the enchantment of distance; 

3. The broadcasting offered is great- 
ly improved and diversified to 
meet all interests; 

4. Radio today still offers the great- 
est value in entertainment, in- 
struction, and service for the 
consumer's dollar. 

"COMMITMENTS GREATER" 
B. Abrams, President, Emerson 
Radio and Phonograph Corpora- 
tion. 

If the experience of the Emerson 
Radio & Phonograph Corporation to 
date can be used as a criterion, the 
1935-36 season will prove to be a rec- 
ord period in the sale of small sets. 
Distributor and dealer commitments 
are far in excess of those during the 
same period a year ago. We report, 
also, that commitments on Emerson 
Consoles are already greater than 



those for the entire season last year. 
I am very much encouraged with 
the outlook. 

"CONSIDERABLE INCREASE" 

Powel Crosley, Jr., President, The 
Crosley Radio Corporation. 

To us here in Cincinnati it looks 
like we are going to have a big radio 
season. 

Sales between now and January 
first should be quite considerably 
ahead of what they were last year. 
We anticipate a very considerable in- 
crease over last year as our new line 
has met with very excellent accept- 
ance in the field. 

"LARGER SETS WILL SELL" 

E. T. Cunningham, President, RCA 
Manufacturing Company. 

There is every indication that the 
new 1935-36 radio season will be the 
most outstanding in recent years. 
Business sentiment is high, purchas- 
ing power and the urge to spend is 
greater, and the added technical im- 
provements incorporated in the new 
radio instruments should make more 
of the radio sets now in use obsolete. 

I look forward to a substantial in- 
crease for the entire industry in the 
coming season. Public and trade ac- 
ceptance of the "Magic Brain" re- 
ceiver has encouraged us to increase 
our production more than 100 per 
cent over last year. 

"ONE OF BEST YEARS" 

E. F. McDonald, Jr., President, 
Zenith Radio Corporation. 

Your inquiry reaches me on board 
my yacht in the Canadian wilderness 
of Georgian Bay. 

Zenith Radio Corporation looks for- 
ward to this as one of its best years. 
Regards. 

"20 PER CENT AHEAD" 

P. R. Mallory, President, P. R. Mal- 
lory & Co. 

Prom our intimate contact with 
customers to whom we supply radio 
parts, it is our opinion that so far 
this year the radio business is about 
20 per cent ahead of the same period 
last year. 

We are optimistic for the future and 
we can see no reason why this rate 
should not be continued at least 
through the balance of the season. 

"NETWORK REVENUE 12 PER 
CENT OVER LAST YEAR" 

Edgar Kobak, Vice-President, Na- 
tional Broadcasting Co. 

Advance bookings for NBC net- 
works show promise that the Pall of 
1935 will be at least 12 per cent bet- 
ter than last Fall. 

Actual revenue figures show that 
the up-swing is already started. With 
time at a premium, many Pall cam- 



paigns are scheduled to start three or 
four weeks sooner than last year. 

"NO MORE SWAPPING DOLLARS" 

N. P. Bloom, President, Adler Manu- 
facturing Company. 

It is my opinion that the radio sea- 
son ahead of us will be a successful 
season. By that I mean that, in the 
main, on the part of the manufacturer, 
distributor and dealer, the days of 
swapping dollars are about over. 
There is a definite trend on the part 
of the consumer toward better mer- 
chandise so that once again the inter- 
est of those engaged in fabrication 
and merchandising of radio is directed 
toward style and performance rather 
than price. 

Men and organizations with courage 
enough to follow' the trend, should do 
at least twenty-five per cent more 
business than they did last year. 

"INCREASED DEMAND 
APPARENT" 

G. E. Deming, Executive Vice-Presi- 
dent, Philadelphia Storage Bat- 
tery Co. 

The advances of science and inven- 
tion in the field of high fidelity radio 
reproduction during the past year 
have made possible a fuller enjoyment 
of the many excellent programs of- 
fered radio listeners. Greater public 
appreciation of the wealth of avail- 
able radio entertainment has trans- 
lated itself into an increased demand 
for quality instruments. The result 
has been record-breaking production 
for Philco during the first half of 
1935, with indications pointing to even 
greater production during the next 
six months. 

"FAR FROM SATURATION" 

C, E. Stahl, Vice-President, Arcturus 
Radio Tube Co. 

The transition of radio from a nov- 
elty to a home necessity is creating a 
demand for better radio equipment 
and this demand is still far from any 
saturation point. In addition, poten- 
tialities for a market for short wave 
sets have not been scratched and with 
the reception now obtainable, a tre- 
mendous market can be cultivated. 

The only deterrent to a highly suc- 
cessful season might be the introduc- 
tion of the metal tube. Irrespective 
of what its merits may be, the public 
may hesitate in accepting an untried 
product and on the other hand, may 
demur in accepting a set equipped 
with the old style glass tubes in face 
of the metal tube propaganda. 



"12 TO 15 PER CENT UP" 

Roy Burlew, Executive A'ice-Presi- 

dent, Ken-Rad Corporation. 

Indications are that radio sales for 
the balance of the current year will 
exceed 1934 sales to the extent of per- 
haps twelve or fifteen per cent. 

This situation can, however, be 
changed very easily if the set manu- 
facturers engage in a further discus- 
sion as to the comparative value of 
metal tubes and glass tubes. 

I might add that the present situa- 
tion has placed the tube manufacturer 
in the middle of an argument in which 
he can not afford to actively engage. 



56 



Radio Today 



Vm»!«» 




A bright beam of light shines through the glowing dials from 
behind — moves up and down on the major dial — and illuminates 
the central reading on the chosen wave band. The lower or 
secondary dial is controlled by the same dual-knob that operates 
the major dial. It is calibrated from 1 to 100, and is geared to 
make five complete revolutions to one trip across the large dial. 



MODEL 81. Walnut veneered 
console, shown below. 40 }i'" high, 
22" wide, 12 V s " deep. An 8-tube 
all-wave superheterodyne cover- 
ing all broadcast service. Over- 
sized, full-range 12" dynamic re- 
producer. List price J. QO Rf\ 
with tubes ?(»7.3U 

MODEL 81M. Same as Model 81, 
with 9 metal tubes. List. $99.50 
MODEL 62. Walnut veneered 
console, 36 3 s" high, 19^4 " wide, 



11 ? s" deep. 6-tube all-wave super- 
heterodyne covering all broadcast 
service. Full-range 10" dynamic 
reproducer. List £CQ K{\ 
price with tubes. . .?J7*Jw 

MODEL 62M. Same as Model 62, 
with 7 metal tubes. List. $67.50 

MODEL 62B. 5-tube farm radio. 
6-volt battery operation. Standard 
broadcast only. Same cabinet as 
Model 62. List <tC^ tZf\ 

price with tubes. . .f3"ti3U 




ACTUALLY — the easiest, simplest, most accurate tuning the 
radio world has experienced to date . . . and that's not all! 

Metal tube models, of course! And numerous outstanding features 
such as . . . Center-Poised Tuning Mechanism with Double-Ratio Con- 
trol for speed and precision . . . Automatic Wave-Route Director that 
balances antennae to circuit for each broadcast band ... Powerfid Full- 
Range Dynamic Reproducers with Multi-Point Tone Control ... Double- 
Action Automatic Volume Control and Logarithmic Manual Control ... 
True-Fidelity Amplifier Circuits, triple-tuned to insure true ratio of 
reproduction to the original broadcast . . . and many other features 
that make the new Arvins your best buy for radio profits. 

Look at the attractive Arvin cabinets! They're designed to enhance 
the beauty of any room . . . Modern in every line, but not too modern- 
istic. Listen to the rich, full tones of the new Arvins ! Every one of the 
eleven models (including two battery-operated table sets and one console) 
is tridy outstanding in its price class . . . The new Arvins have every- 
thing your customers "want, at prices they can afford to pay. This 
means more sales and greater profits for you. See your Arvin jobber! 

NOBLITT-SPARES INDUSTRIES, Inc., COLUMBUS. INDIANA 



MODEL 61. A 6-tube all-wave su- 
perheterodyne covering all broad- 
cast service. Full-range 8" dynamic 
reproducer. Walnut veneered cabi- 
net, shown below, 1\ l /2" high, 16, 1 2" 
wide, 1 % " deep. <LAQ ft C 
Lis t price wi Lb. tubes t*|7»73 
MODEL 6lM. Same as Model 61, 
except with 7 metal tubes. List price 

with tubes $57.95 

MODEL 61B. A 5-tube farm radio. 
6-volt battery operation. Standard 
broadcast. Cabinet like <ty|^ ftC 
Mod.61.Listwithtubes^*l^.yD 



MODEL 51. A 5-tube skip-band 
superheterodvne. Frequency range: 
540 to 1750 KC— 5.5 to 18.0 MG. 
Full-range 6" dynamic reproducer. 
Walnut, veneered cabinet shown be- 
low, 14^" high, 12" wide, 8" deep. 
Last price with 
tubes 



$32.95 



MODEL 51B. 4-tube farm radio. 
2-volt air cell battery operation. 
Standard broadcast only. Same cab- 
inet as Model 51. <£.*)>! ft C 
List price with tubes. •PX4.7J 



MODEL 41. A 4-tube AC super- 
heterodyne in attractive, portable- 
sized cabinet 13" high, 105-g" wide, 
7H" deep. Frequency range 1750 
to 540 KG. Covers all standard and 
some high-fidelity, police and ama- 
teur broadcasts. A really dependable 
low-priced set, built so well that you 
can sell it with confidence and assur- 
ance of customer satisfaction. 
List price & 1 ft ft C 

with tubes $1 y.y 5 

Prices of all models are slightly- 
higher, Denver and West 








fttf iJuz Jt/LaJz£A4 &£ 




By popular approval, we again draw aside the 
curtain on Model A-125, accepted everywhere 
by dealers and the public alike as the radio 
sensation of the year. Here are a few of the 
many startling features that place Model A-125 
in the spotlight of fame. 

METAL TUBES 



Equipped 100% with 12 all-metal 
tubes. 

SLIDING-RULE 
TUNING SCALE 

All stations listed in a horizontal 
line. "Easy to read as a ruler." Au- 
tomatic two speed vernier tuning. 

SENTRY BOX 

Passes only the desired frequency, 
rejecting all others. Coils are mount- 
ed directly on switch points. Sepa- 
rate coils for each band and no 
tapped coils are used. 

PERMALINERS 

Sealed air dielectric trimmer con- 
densers permanently maintain per- 
fect alignment of all parts of circuit. 

STABILIZED 
DYNAMIC SPEAKER 

A 10*4 -inch speaker of new design. 
Projection welding assures perman- 
ent and perfect alignment of all 
magnetic paths. 




Furnishes a refined vernier reading 
for any point on main dial. 

SHADOW BAND TUNER 

Indicates when receiver is in reson- 
ance with desired station. 

ADDITIONAL FEATURES 

Noise Control Automatic TWO- 

speed Station Finder Deluxe Con- 
sole Cabinet Antenna and Ground 

Connection Board for easy connec- 
tion to G-E "V" Doublet Antenna. 



Model A-125 and its full line of companion 
models are supported by a merchandising and 
powerful sales promotion program that is mak- 
ing radio history for franchised G-E Radio 
Dealers. Ask your General Electric Radio Dis- 
tributor for complete details. Or write the Gen- 
eral Electric Company, Section R-149, Mer- 
chandise Department, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 




GENERAL 
ELECTRIC 

RADIO 

With the tube that's "Sealed in Steel" 

MERCHANDISE DEPARTMENT 

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 
BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT 



▲ 



ft 





ft 



▲ 



$1 Yearly OCT Si i 



Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexini 



New York City 



Radio Trade Outlook 

— sets sold this year may cross 
5,000,000 first time in history 

— manufacturers report production far 
behind orders 

— passing 1929 peak in unit and $ 
volume considered probable this 
season 

— set manufacturers report October 
20% ahead of September, and 50 
to 1 00% over last year 

— retail trade preparing sales promo- 
tion plans to win every possible 
sale 

— interest in higher-priced models 
one of brightest spots in picture 



Broadcast Billings Mount 

— October continues upswing en- 
joyed during 1st 9 months '35 

— NBC October revenue up $471,- 
000 over Oct., '34 

— CBS billings up $117,400 over 
October, last year 

— total broadcast advertising this 
month tops 1934 by 13% 



Tubes Today 

— 1 50,000 metal tubes now produced 
daily 

— set-makers needs met in 60 days 



— few service kicks from metal sets in 
use 

— tube sales up 18% during '35 

General Business 

— index levels off after 2-month 
increase 

— still about 1 4% above 1 934 

— automobile sales 29% over last 
year 

— earnings, employment definitely up 

— retail buying spree in N. Y. 

— $300,000,000 gold to U. S. from 
Europe 

— copper prices up due to war scare 




• OCTO 



3 5* 




On the Air, 

as in the Big Cage- 




wins the crowds! 



Whatever the show — Showmanship wins. The 
animal trainer, master showman of vicarious 
thrills. The radio stars, welcome guests in the 
homes of a vast unseen audience. Showman- 
ship gives the whole world the entertainment 
it wants — thrills, love, tears and laughter. With- 
out these, there is no entertainment — no audi- 
ence—and no receiver sales. 

Sponsored and sustaining programs on NBC 
networks are notable examples of the top- 
flight radio showmanship of progressive adver- 
tisers, advertising agencies and the NBC 
Program Department. Programs on NBC net- 
works are consistently voted the winners by 
the greatest air audiences in the world. 

These audiences are your immediate prospects. 
They listen to their radios because of the nation- 
ally famous programs they hear. NBC Show- 
manship therefore makes a constant and an 
invaluable contribution to your business. 

For maximum sales effectiveness, feature not 
only the fine instruments you have for sale, but 
also the outstanding NBC programs. They are 
one of your greatest sales assets, providing the 
incentive for better receiving sets. 

_Zune in the RCA Magic Key Program 
every Sunday 2 to 3 P. M., E. S. T. 
on WJZ and associated NBC stations. 



National Broadcasting Company, Inc. 

A Radio Corporation of America Subsidiary 
NEW YORK • CHICAGO • WASHINGTON • SAN FRANCISCO 



Photograph from Universal Pictures Corpora- 
tion picture, "The Bin Cace", based on the 
Appleton-Century book of the same name, 
written by Edward Anthony and Clyde Beatty. 




METAL TUBE SETS 



HOWARD Foresaw the present shortage of materials and bought 
for the future with the largest commitments in HOWARD'S 
long history. 

As a result HOWARD can deliver the complete line including 
metal tube sets! 

Nine receivers. 4- 5- 6- 7- and 9-tube models from $1 7.95 to 
$124.50. Plus the world's finest radio receiver — the 1 9-tube 
grand at $295.00. 

DISTRIBUTORS AND DEALERS WRITE OR WIRE FOR 
DETAILS! YOUR TERRITORY MAY STILL BE OPEN 

HOLUHRD 

HOWARD RADIO COMPANY 

1731 BELMONT AVENUE, CHICAGO 
AMERICA'S OLDEST RADIO MANUFACTURER 



Radio Today, published monthly by Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 4S0 Lexington Avenue, New York City 

Subscriptions yearly, $1 in U. S.; $2 in Canada and foreign countries. Special charter subscription U S 

only, good for a limited time — 14 Months SI. Copyright 1935 bv Caldwell-Clements. Inc. 



October, 1935 



IS OUR FACE RED? 

What they said about RADIO TODAY'S first issue. 



GREAT 

"On a business trip and hauled along 
Vol. 1, No. 1, 'Radio Today.' Have 
read, scrutinized and analyzed the 
issue. It is great. Heartiest con- 
gratulations to you, your staff and 
the radio industry." — Alfred J. Mc- 
Cosker, President Bamberger Broad- 
casting Corp. (WOR), New York City. 

INFORMATIVE 

"If the first issue of 'Radio Today' is 
any indication of the high-tone and 
informative publication that we 
might expect monthly, you may feel 
assured that we will greatly enjoy 
every issue." — Maurice B. Isaacs, 
Mory Sales Corp., Philco distribution, 
New Haven, Conn. 

GOOD 

"I believed that if Mr. Caldwell or Mr. 
Clements had anything to do with a 
new magazine, it just had to be 
good!" — Morris E. skill more. Patter- 
son, New York. 

RIDER TOPS 

"Your magazine is O.K. Rider's arti- 
cles are the tops. We congratulate 
you." — O. S. Magee, Magee Radio 
sales and Service. Bethesda, Md. 



FRANK 

"I believe there is a definite place for 
your magazine if the comments are 
kept brutally frank and free of prej- 
udice." — W. L. McAllister, Loveman, 
Joseph & Loeb, Birmingham, Ala. 

SOVGHT 

"If the first is a fair sample of issues 
to follow, I want to be on your mail- 
ing list. Here's my dollar." — Walter 
M. Marvin, Montgomery Fair, Mont- 
gomery, Ala. 

SOMETHING 

"My comment to a traveling man. 
after looking through the first issue 
of 'Radio Today' was: There is a 
magazine that looks like it will be 
something in the trade paper field." 
— R. L. Genving. 



UP-AND-COMING 

"Frankly, 'Radio Today' has all the 
earmarks of something-up-and-com- 
ing. I am very favorably impressed 
with its terse style; the very clear 
manner in which you report the en- 
tire radio field, and the concise treat- 
ment without the use of too many 
adjectives." — Porter T. Bennett, Su- 
perior Radio Service, Dallas, Texas. 

ENJOYABLE 

" 'Radio Today's' lay-out is fine. I en- 
joy your offering, and it is a pleasure 
to send my subscription order." — 
James Miller, Atlanta, Ga. 

PEER 

"Congratulations on the fine magazine. 
It's the peer of all trade magazines." 
— T. V. C:ark. 

COVERS FIELD 

"I have read "with a great deal of in- 
terest your new magazine 'Radio 
Today.' I think it covers the radio 
field in a manner in which it has 
not been covered up to this time." — 
O. B. Hanson, Chief Engineer, Na- 
tional Broadcasting Co., New York 
City. 

LOOKED SO GOOD 

"I saw a copy of 'Radio Today' at one 
of our Philco distributors, and it 
looked so good I am enclosing check. 
Please list me as subscriber." — 
Peter Kain, Mgr., Atlantic Div., 
Philco Radio & Television Corp.. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

WELL-HANDLED 

"I feel that you should be very much 
complimented on the first issue of 
'Radio Today.' Factually, it contains 
more information than I have ever 
seen in one issue of any trade mag- 
azine." — Paul S. Ellison, Hygrade 
Sylvania Corp., New York City. 

NEWSY 

"I find the first issue of 'Radio Today' 
very newsy and interesting." — Percy 
R. Bowers, Rudolph Wurlitzer Co., 
New York City. 






Reader A. J. McCosker (right) just celebrated his 12th anniversary as chief of 
M'OR. Engineer Poppele shoios him WOR's newest wrinkle in mikes. 



PLEASING 

"Well pleased with the September is- 
sue. At present I do not subscribe 
to any radio publication except 
yours." — William I. Winslow, Wins- 
low Radio and Merchandise Co., 
Douglas, Wyo. 

TALENT 

"When I saw the list of talent con- 
nected with your publication, I natu- 
rally concluded it had to be good, 
and was not a bit disappointed in 
your first number. I am particularly 
interested in trade magazines that 
will give the news reliably and 
unprejudiced." — A d o 1 p h Wagner, 
Wagner Radio Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 



HIT 

"I have read 'Radio Today' with great 
interest and I feel sure that you . 
have hit on a method of interpreting 
the radio news, personnel, and de- 
velopment." — Louis K.. Comstock, 
President, Merchants Association, 
New York City. 

SUCCESS 

"I hasten to send you my congratula- 
tions and best wishes for the prompt 
success of your effort." — Wilson N. 
Durham, Broadcasting Abroad. Ltd., 
New York City. 

GOOD JOB 

"Knowing the good work you have 
done in the past, I wish you every 
success, and believe you will be able 
to do a very good job for everybody. 
Money order attached." — O. P. Min- 
gay. Managing Director, Australian 
Radio Publications, Ltd., Sydney. 
Australia. 

RIGHT 

"The first issue of 'Radio Today' seems 
to fill a very definite need. Covering 
the important phases of conditions 
of general interest to the industry 
is a large and important task, but 
apparently you are setting about to 
do it in the right manner." — J. C. 
Rapp, Station KMA, Shenandoah. 
Iowa. 

EXCELLENT 

"The birthday issue of 'Radio Today' 
is most interesting and well assem- 
bled. I note the wider field it covers 
and also the excellent advertising 
coverage of RMA members." — Bond 
Gcddes, Radio Manufacturers Assn., 
Washington, D. C. 

STREAMLINED 

"During my 26 years in radio I have 
seen a great many publications deal- 
ing with the industry, but I am frank 
to state that of all those I have seen 
none can compare with 'Radio Today.' 
'Streamlined' is the best word I can 
think of." — R. E. Smiley, Continental 
Electric Co., Saint Charles, 111. 

FINE 

"I extend my congratulations on the 
first issue of 'Radio Today.' If fu- 
ture issues have the same fine style 
of reporting and authoritative items, 
I predict a long and successful career 
for the 'radio baby' that started out 
like a man!" — Tom Joyce, RCA- 
Victor, Camden, N. J. 

HEARTY WISHES 

"My heartiest wishes for your success." 
— C. M. Jansky, Jr., Jansky & Bailey, 
Washington, D. C. 

HELPFUL 

"Have enjoyed reading the first issue 
of 'Radio Today.' This magazine 
will no doubt help the radio engi- 
neers and technicians to understand 
the 'bread and butter' side of the in- 
dustry, which is a very important 
part, too, because it keeps the wheels 
going around." — George Krivitzky, 
Station WKBZ, Muskegon, Mich. 

RECOMMENDED 

"Your magazine looks very good, I 
congratulate you and wish you plenty 
of luck. I am recommending it and 
hope it becomes the leader." — 
B. Fredericks, Los Angeles, Calif. 



Radio Today 



COMPLETE 

" 'Radio Today' is certainly most com- 
plete and up to the minute, and I 
believe that any one connected with 
any of the electronic industries can 
not afford to miss it." — Louis Gerard 
Pacent, Pacent Engineering Corp., 
New York City. 

WELL-PRESENTED 

"Congratulations. Your magazine is 
well-presented, timely and interest- 
ing." — Richard C. Patterson, Jr., 

Exec. Vice-Pres. NBC, New York City. 



BRILLIANT 

"I compliment you on the birth of this 
latest development in radio journal- 
ism, your brilliant issue of 'Radio 
Today.' It is treated with courage 
and independence, and I can predict 
that 'Radio Today' will become the 
forum of the radio art." — Capt. O. 
Fulton, Fultograph, Inc., New York 
City. 

CORRECT 

"You seem to have the correct ap- 
proach in 'Radio Today' that should 
wake everybody ^up and do a lot of 
good. It certainly is full of pep." — 
C. R. Underbill, Lower Bank, N. J. 



GO FAR 

"I have just completed reading your 
first issue. 'Radio Today' should go 
far, as it is without doubt the great- 
est publication of its kind to hit the 
m a r k e t." — Kenneth W. Stowman, 
Station WCAU, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BEAUTIFUL 

"You are certainly to be congratulated. 
It is a beautiful number and we have 
all found it intensely interesting." — 
John Parkerson, Transradio Press 
Service, New York City. 

HAS BACKGROUND 

"I feel confident that 'Radio Today' will 
prove a brilliant success in view of 
the background of yourself and asso- 
ciates." — L. F. Muter, The Muter Co., 
President RMA, Chicago. 

ALL THE LUCK 

"Here's to wish you all the luck in the 
world! Enclosed is my check." — Roy 
S. Durstine, Batten, Barton, Durstine 
& Osborn, New York City. 



BEST WISHES 

"I extend my best and sincerest wishes 
for the success of your undertaking. 
1 certainly want a subscription." — 
E. K. Cohan, Director of General En- 
gineering, Columbia Broadcasting 
System. 

LIKED 

"I have seen your first issue of 'Radio 
Today' and J like it. I congratulate 
you both upon its appearance and 
the subject matter." — John W. Van 
Allen, Gen'l Counsel. RMA, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

BEST 

" 'Radio Today' is the best I have ever 
seen . . . timely, snappy, newsy, good 
sales and service helps." — W. T. Buln. 

DESERVING 

"Congratulations on the fine book you 
have turned out. I wish for you and 
it the success you deserve. "—Herbert 
Metz, Graybar Electric Co., New York 
City. 

ADMIRABLE 

"The high standard of 'Radio Today' is 
worthy of admiration. Our buyers 
and servicemen speak in the highest 
terms of it." — C. Kent, Rich & Co., 
Saginaw, Mich. 

FINE EDITORSHTP 

"Good luck and every good wish in 
publishing 'Radio Today.' With your 
enthusiasm and fine editorship, suc- 
cess should crown the new creation." 
— Orrin E. Dunlap, Jr., Radio Editor. 
New York "Times." 




Radio Today's first California subscriber, Roy F. Bledsoe, Bakersfield, Calif., 
with (he writes us) "two reasons for being in radio today." 



NICE 

"The first issue of 'Radio Today' is a 
nice piece of work and I congratu- 
late you both on the editorial 
make-up and the amount of lineage 
carried." — Herbert H. Frost, New 
York City. 

VIGOROUS 

" 'Radio Today' reflects the present and 
presages the future of radio. It is 
snappy, vigorous and informing. I 
prophesy a splendid future and con- 
gratulate you and your associates." 
— Edward J. Nally, Radio Corp. of 
America, New York City. 



IMPARTIAL 

'You are to be congratulated on this 
issue of 'Radio Today,' not only on 
the editorial style but on the fact 
that your presentation has been so 
impartial and newsy." — C, E, Stahl, 
Arcturus Radio Tube Co., Newark. 
N. J. 

FINE JOB 

T have just read through the first is- 
sue of 'Radio Today' and wish to 
congratulate you on doing such a 
fine job." — Robert Hertzberg, Whole- 
sale Radio Service Co., New York 
City. 

NOTABLE 

"I want to congratulate you and wish 
you the best of good fortune in your 
new venture. Being one who is fa- 
miliar with your background. I have 
no doubt whatever that yours will 
be a notable contribution to the 
field." — S. H. Hartley, General Tele- 
vision & Radio Corp., New Y'ork City. 



EVERY SUCCESS 

'May I congratulate you upon your 
new venture. I wish every success 
for 'Radio Today.' " — Roy Burlew, 
Ken-Rad Corp., Owensboro, Ken. 



GOOD LUCK 

"Just a line to wish you and your as- 
sociates all success and much good 
luck in your new undertaking." — 
Oliver C. Harriman, 515 Madison 
Ave., New York City. 



WELL-RECEIVED 

"I have read the first copy of 'Radio 
Today' and find it very interesting 
and might add that it has received 
much favorable comment around the 
station." — Harry T. Catterall, Station 
WJAY, Cleveland, Ohio. 



PLEASANT SURPRISE 

"When I saw the first copy of 'Radio 
Today' I "was pleasantly surprised, 
for it gave a good coverage of the 
high lights in radio from every angle, 
bringing to the busy serviceman a 
synopsis of the progress of radio 
from a scientific point and also from 
the service point of view." — J. P. Mc- 
Girt, McGirt Radio Service, Way- 
cross, Ga. 

PERTINENT 

"The first issue of 'Radio Today' was 
received and everyone here appre- 
ciated it, thought it was pertinent, 
to the point, condensed, complete and 
thorough." — Laurence H. Lueker, 
Lucker Sales Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

ALL SUCCESS 

"I congratulate both you and Mr. 
Clements on entering your new pub- 
lishing service. I wish you all the 
success in the world." — Fred D. Wil- 
liams, International Resistance Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

HIGH-STANDARD 

"I knew that 'Radio Today' would be a 
worth while job. I am afraid that 
the very high standard which the 
first issue of 'Radio Today' has set 
will cause you a certain amount of 
very serious scratching if it is to be 
kept up." — Arthur H. Lynch, New 
York City. 

RIDER 

"I have read your article on shoestring 
investment and haywire methods in 
the radio service industry. You have 
hit the nail right on the head and 
if that article could be put in front 
of everyone interested in the service 
business it would do much good." — 
H. A. Shannon, Shannon Radio Serv- 
ice, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

CONGRATULATIONS 

"I am very much pleased with the first 
copy of 'Radio Today.' I believe 
yourself and associates are to be 
congratulated on the first issue and 
I am convinced that subsequent is- 
sues will be even more interesting." 
— John W. Hubbell, Russell C. Comer 
Advertising Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

INTEISESTING 

"I have just received the first copy of 
'Radio Today.' It is with sincere 
appreciation that I tell vou how in- 
teresting I have found it." — Herbert 
Hollister, Station WLBF, Kansas 
City, Kan. 



October, 1935 




Guided only by a radio 
direction compass, 
tuned on broadcasting 
stations, this Lockheed 
Vega plane flew in one 
day around a 1,300-mile 
circle from New York 
to Cleveland and back 
to Washington. 



Henry Ford, riding 
around Schenectady, 
N. Y., in this two-way 
police radio car, had a 
talk via short-waves 
with his manager in 
Buenos Aires, Argen- 
tina. 



RADIO EVENTS 

IN THE 
DAY'S NEWS 




-i shaft of I i g h t, 
streaming 7 miles 
down the side of 
Whiteface Mountain, in 
the Adirondack s, 
carried the voice of 
Governor Herbert H. 
Lehman of New York 
state. President Roose- 
velt used the device 
next day to dedicate 
the Whiteface Memo- 
rial Highway. 



Paris fashions in radio 
— a combined receiver, 
phonograph, and bar — 
among the 10,000 sets 
displayed last month at 
the annual Radio Shoic 
in Paris, France. 




Radio Today 



©C1B 278344 



Staff— 

Darbell Bartee 
Franklin S. Irby 
Randall R. Irwin 
G. H. Mayorga 
M. H. Newton 
J. E. Osmun 
John F. Rider 
B. V. Spinetta 
V. K. Ulrich 



Lee Robinson 

Sales Manage 



RADIO 
TODAY 



Orestes H. Caldwell 
Editor 

M. Clements 
Publisher 

480 Lexington Ave. 

New York City 
Tel. PLaza 3-1340 

Vol. I, No. 2 



General levels above '34 

* General business index 
levelled off in September after a two- 
month increase in July and August. 
September, '35, business, however, is 
still safely up from corresponding '34 
period. Basic index stands now at 
about 86, after reaching 88 in August 
and early September; upward swing- 
is expected to resume again well be- 
fore the middle of November. Index 
this time last year stood at 75, 11 or 
12 points lower than current year. 

Earnings, employment up 

* Uptrend in earnings 
and employment is reported by Na- 
tional Industrial Conference Board. 
Average hourly earnings in 25 key 
industries reporting to the Board now 
stand at highest point since uptrend 
in hourly wages began during Sum- 
mer of 1933. Figures for latest 30- 
day period show payrolls 3.4% larger 
than previous month, and 20.2% 
higher than corresponding month last 
year. 

Employment, too, is up. Though 
the increase is not large, it is indica- 
tion that unemployment is definitely 
headed downward. Latest NICB fig- 
ures available show unemployed to 
stand at 9,901,000, as against 10,223,- 
000 this time last year. 

Bright spots 

+ Decline in freight car 
loadings due to coal strike, and slight 
decrease in steel-mill activity affected 
index adversely in September. Bright 
spots, however, offset these declines, 
causing index to level off rather than 
decline as a whole. Electric power 
production, lumber production and 
cotton cloth production remain about 
the same compared with last month, 
although still far ahead of this time 
last year. 

Automobile sales and production 
still stand at tops of bright spots. 

October, 1935 



Switching of N. Y. auto show from 
January to November said to have 
done much toward making the Fall 
a banner auto season. Passenger car 
and truck sales and production, while 
down somewhat in October, are ex- 
pected to reach new peaks in Novem- 
ber as new new models shown at show 
get under way. Automobile Manu- 
facturers' Association reports 1935 
sales of passenger cars, U. S. and 
Canada, expected to total 2,960,000, 
with trucks at 740,000, a 29% increase 
over 1934. 

Radio's big season 

* Biggest selling season 
of year in radio sees practically en- 
tire industry in furore of sales and 
production. Set-makers report pro- 
duction far behind orders, with more 
orders on hand than they can fill in 
near future. 

Philco reports factory employees in- 
creased from 8,700 to 10,340, with 
production set at 9,000 sets daily; 
General Electric added 1,100 to pay- 




roll last month and reports third- 
quarter orders up 34% over sim- 
ilar period last year; Emerson Eadio 
expects October to top September by 
20% and looks forward to 100% in- 
crease over October, '34. 

RMA figures 50,000 factory em- 
ployees compared with normal of 
40,000 at this time; sales of EMA 
members said to be 20% ahead of last 
year, and number of sets sold in 1935 
may cross 5,000,000 mark for first 
time in history. 

Prospect of 1935-36 season exceed- 
ing peak of '29 both in dollar vol- 
ume and number of sets sold is con- 
sidered highly probable. 

Trade factors better 

* Part of credit for im- 
proved conditions in U. S. believed 
due to favorable trade and monetary 
factors. Flow of gold from Europe 
to II. S. began September 9th and is 
thought to total almost $300,000,000 
since early September. 

Another favorable factor is lipping 
price of copper. Sudden wave of buy- 
ing sent price of this basic metal in 
European centers to 9.05 cents a 
pound, highest since July, 1933. Fear 
of general European war is increas- 
ing demand for copper, and large in- 
creases in purchases will result in 
greater activity here ; as copper is one 
of II. S. basic industries, favorable 
copper conditions will have good ef- 
fect all around. 

Broadcast revenue up 

* Revenue from sale of 
local and network time continues to 
show satisfying increases. CBS re- 
ports advance bookings for October 
indicate month's billings will total 
$1,870,000, compared with $1,752,601 
for October, 1934. October figure for 
NBC's two webs is estimated at $3.- 
247,254 as against $2,775,431 same 
month last year. 

Total broadcast billings, all sta- 



tions, local and network, for October 
is expected to top the $10,230,000 
mark; this compares with $9,056,064 
for corresponding month last year, an 
increase of some 13%. 

Broadcast billings for last quarter, 
as indicated by October figures, will 
undoubtedly continue same upswing 
of 10 to 25% over 1934 as was en- 
joyed during first nine months. If 
so, 1935 will go down in history as 
the peak to date for broadcast adver- 
tising. 

Television cable in doubt 

* Considerable dissatis- 
faction has been expressed with the 
ruling by the FCC that the 90-mile 
co-axial cable proposed by the A. T. 
& T. Co., between New York and 
Philadelphia, be thrown open to the 
use of the telephone company's com- 
petitors, and some question has been 
raised whether the 'phone company 
would go ahead with its million- 
dollar project. The cable is planned 
to carry 200 phone conversations 
simultaneously over a single conduc- 
tor, but would convey a million-cycle 
television picture in both directions. 

So far no definite announcement 
has been made from AT&T offices 
that cable would be dropped, but an 
alternative statement from Bell Labs 
indicates that a co-axial experimental 
loop may be laid at Morristown, Pa., 
for test purposes. Meanwhile produc- 
tion of the cable is being held up, 
partially because terminal equipment 
is still in the development stage. 




Sponsor-of-stars A. Atwater Kent chats 

with, James Melton, singer on a recent 

program of the AK series. 



America leads — Sarnoff 

* Research in radio and 
television in Europe is not as far ad- 
vanced as in America, D'avid Sarnoff, 
chairman of the board of National 
Broadcasting Company and president 
of the Radio Corporation of America, 
said on his return from a two-month 
visit abroad. 

"I studied the technical develop- 
ments in the important radio labora- 
tories in Europe and saw their latest 
television experiments," he said. 
"While interesting research work is 
being done along these lines in sev- 
eral European countries, the prog- 
ress being made in our own country 
is in advance of anything I saw 
abroad. America continues to lead 
the world in radio." 

Prices Higher Abroad 

Radio is gaining rapidly in popu- 
larity abroad, he said, in spite of the 
fact that European listeners are re- 
quired to have government licenses 
and pay an annual fee for the privi- 
lege of listening. 

"Prices of tubes and sets in Europe 
are much higher than in America," 
Mr. Sarnoff also pointed out. 

"In England the B.B.C., while 
government owned, is, nevertheless, 
permitted to exercise a measure of 
freedom ; but in other European coun- 
tries, especially where dictatorship is 
the order of the day, radio is pri- 
marily used for propaganda purposes. 
In such countries no word of opposi- 
tion to those in control may be ut- 
tered, nor may any difference with 
their opinions be expressed. 

"But despite these restrictions and 
repressions, radio programs continue 
to cross the borders and are increas- 
ingly welcome visitors in European 
homes. The increase in short wave 
transmission has brought to the 
people on the European continent the 
realization that through their radio 
receiving sets they can come to know 
more about themselves, their neigh- 
bors and those far away. 

"They realize today that, like the 
automobile, the radio set is no longer 
an experiment. It has become a neces- 
sity of modern life — the window at 
which the family sits and views the 
world. 

"In England business is good and 
employment is increasing. In the 
other countries I visited business con- 
ditions vary, but, on the whole, the 
direction is upward. On the other 
hand, the political uncertainties now 
overhanging Europe are retarding 
progress and stand in the way of a 
more basic economic recovery." 




Returning from Carlsbad, David Sarn- 
off opened RCA's "Magic Key" pro- 
gram from mid-ocean. 

173,000 at N. Y. radio show 

* Public attendance at 
the National Electrical and Radio 
Exposition, Grand Central Palace, 
New York City, Sept. 18-28, exceeded 
by 35 per cent previous records, ac- 
cording to Ralph Neumuller, manag- 
ing director. Total for the eleven 
days was put at 173,000. 

"The greatest interest displayed 
was in console radios, running from 
$60 to $130," said Mr. Neumuller. 
"Interest in the lower-priced midget 
sets was so slight that the exhibitors 
moved them further back during each 
day of the Exposition until Wednes- 
day, when they were put in the most 
inconspicuous spot in the booths. 

"When can you ship us more goods ? 
was the first question from over 85% 
of the visitors daily. Despite the fact 
that all of the radio manufacturers 
have increased production, the sales 
managers' chief worry at present ap- 
pears to be — how soon can they make 
deliveries. This was true, we found, 
in over 95% of the cases." 

Fight helps kilowatts 

* The Baer-Louis brawl 
September 24th set a 3-year record 
for electricity consumption in New 
York, the N. Y. Edison Co. reports; 
341,000 more kilowatt hours were 
used that night than on previous 
night. 

Upping of kilowatt consumption 



Radio Today 



for special broadcasts indicates public 
listens when there is something it 
wants to hear, and it definitely seems 
to want to hear fights, in spite of 
highbrow reports to the contrary. 
Fact also throws a challenge to broad- 
casters; upward surge in kilowatts 
used when a fight is on the air indi- 
cates a good many more sets turned 
on than is usual. We can't have a 
heavyweight fight every night, but in- 
genious program-preparers might find 
some significance in this obvious op- 
portunity for more programs that will 
make them listen, drag 'em to the 
loud speaker every night! 

$1,100,000,000 advertising 

* That broadcasting is 
still a very small part of the U. S. 
advertising bill is revealed by totals 
for other media. 

Newspapers are now running $485,- 
000,000 annually; periodicals and 
magazines $125,000,000 ; outdoor $25,- 
000,000. Direct mail, the largest "un- 
known quantity," is estimated at 
$365,000,000. Putting broadcasting 
at $100,000,000 for the current' season, 
this brings the total U. S. advertising 
bill up to $1,100,000,000 annually. 

Farmers want better sets 

* Trend toward higher- 
priced sets does not seem to be con- 
fined to Metropolitan areas. Whole- 
salers serving rural territories say it 
is most surprising this Fall to see 
orders for 11, 13 and 15-tube sets 
come in from dealers in towns of 
1,000 and less population. 

Fundamental increases in farm in- 
comes continue into Fall — it is no 
longer true that main crops are har- 
vested and marketed at the end of the 
summer season. Wheat prices are up 
and may climb further; livestock ac- 
tivity continues. 

Development of windehargers has 
linked farmers closer to better radio 
programs. Efforts of the manufac- 
turers to give rural owners better bat- 
tery facilities may also be a factor in 
the farmer's renewed interest in a 
finer set. 

Short-ivave promotion 

* In wide-awake com- 
munities where newspapers are. pub- 
lishing weekly foreign short-wave pro- 
grams, dealers have noted a new 
strength in sales of short-wave sets. 
It appears that in many cases dealers 
have suggested to the publishers that 
the service is valuable and timely. 

Complimentary short-wave program 
service offered by the Service Bureau 
of the RMA (1317 F St., N. W., 
Washington, D. C.) has already been 




Poivel Crosley, Jr.. chairman RMA's 

committee on sales promotion, sees 

new radio horizons. 

welcomed by hundreds of newspapers 
throughout the country who have 
made it a permanent feature, often 
without re-writing. The service is 
detailed and complete and has been 
found by many editors to have a sure- 
fire reader interest. 

News dramas to front 

* Matter of the drama- 
tization of news as a broadcast fea- 
ture has landed in the headlines this 
month. The mag Neu'S-Week has an- 
nounced a new treatment of news 
episodes in the form of a 15-minute 
electrical transcription, edited weekly 
by its staff. Since this "Radio News- 



Week" is a wax affair, it will get a 
localized promotion not available to 
the live features. World Broadcast- 
ing makes the records. 

Claimed the oldest every-day news 
drama on the air is WMCA's "Five 
Star Final." Philip Barrison directs 
this well established series, which is 
heard nightly on an inter-city group 
of stations, and he has dedicated his 
work to the belief that "the radio au- 
dience is more interested in human 
interest news than in the doings of 
Kings and Queens." 

Such arguments to the contrary, 
"The March of Time," the big Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting featui'e, likes its 
international news, and has been very 
busy and successful with dramatizing 
the Ethiopian mess. Able Arthur 
Pryor keeps the thing in shape. 

Railway Express Co. to add life to 
the news racket has hit a snag with 
its "News Parade." Both NBC and 
CBS ruled it off their nets because it 
seemed to them an obvious take-off 
on "The March of Time." Railway 
episodes used the transition phrase, 
"time moves on" and its similarity to 
Time's words, "time marches on" was 
uncomfortable to some. 

Metal-shield, not metal-tube 

* Complaint against tube 
sellers who offer glass tubes in spe- 
cial metal shields and call them 
"metal tubes" is made by Paul Ellison 
of Hygrade Sylvania, who points out 
that if the public believes it is get- 
ting metal tubes and then finds it has 
been bilked, the reaction felt is di- 
rected against both the dealer who 
sold the set and the radio industry 
as a whole. 




Every night's a first night in Studio 3 at GB8. Arthur Pryor (left) and his cast 
of news dramatizers in the powerful "March of Time," storming the air waves 

5 nights a week. 



October, 1935 



Paley's glad hand 

* WJR of Detroit got a 
gala welcome to the Columbia net- 
work on Sept. 29 with an interna- 
tional broadcast and a feature dedi- 
cation program. William S. Paley, 
Columbia president, was in London 
at the time; he had a place in the 
program, however, so he went to the 
studios of the British Broadcasting 
System and said things which need 
quoting. 

"The advertiser and the artist, the 
sportsman and scholar, engineers, 
statesmen and authors, the church 
and the government have all formed 
this living dramatic pattern that is 
American broadcasting," came the 
voice of Mr. Paley. 

He went on to remark that the 
tastes and preferences of listeners 
were the basic part of the pattern ; 
that it was the job of the broadcasters 
to deal fairly and promptly with the 
issues of the day. "In this spirit and 
with these goals," the CBS prexy wel- 
comed WJR to the web. 

Also heard during the hour were 
Colonel Stoopnagle and Budd, George 
Burns and Gracie Allen, Mark War- 
now's orchestra, Eddie Dunstedter. 
Loretta Lee, Jerry Cooper, Virginia 
Verrill, the Malo quartet, Mary East- 
man and Jimmy Farrell. 

WJR's new 50,000-watt transmitter 
was dedicated, and a convincing re- 
sume of the station's growth came 
out in a two-way radio conversation 
between Ted Husing, CBS sports an- 
nouncer, and Leo Fitzpatrick, general 
manager of WJR. 

"All-wave" questioned 

* The Federal Trade 
Commission has raised questions con- 
cerning the use of the terms "all- 
wave," "world-wave" and similar ex- 
pressions regarding radio sets, but 
after discussion with RMA executives 
has temporarily suspended individual 
cases pending against set-manufac- 
turers for use of these terms in mer- 
chandising and advertising short- 
wave receivers. 

Two years ago the BMA board of 
directors, following recommendations 
of its engineering division, formally 
adopted a definition for "All-Wave" 
sets in the American market to in- 
clude sets with a reception range from 
540 to 18,000 kilocycles. This defini- 
tion was questioned .by the Federal 
Trade Commission, but continuation 
of the "All-Wave" term is proposed 
by RMA in its conferences with the 
Commission. The "All-Wave" term 
has received the official endorsement 




William 8. Paley, CBS president: . . . 
speaking from BBC in London. "I 
welcome WJR to Columbia." 



of the Federal Communications Com- 
mission. A letter from Andrew Ring, 
acting chief engineer of the Com- 
munications Commission, supports 
the term as correct and not mislead- 
ing. Individual cases involving use 
of the "All- Wave" and similar terms 
have been suspended by the Trade 
Commission pending consideration of 
the proposed RMA trade practice 
agreement for set manufacturers. The 
latter covers many merchandising 
practices and was considered by the 
RMA board of directors at New 
York on September 25. 



Season of symphonies 

* Serious listeners have 
recently noted a rush of symphonic 
grandeur on the air. Nearly 20 sym- 
phonies of accepted national repute 
are in the program news, offering one 
of the -most important seasons of 
broadcast history. 

Aside from the New York orches- 
tras, which include the Philharmonic 
of Carnegie Hall, the Radio City 
Symphony, WOR's Little Symphony, 
and the NBC organization, the well 
known symphonies in the. news are of 
Detroit, Dallas, Kansas City, Roches- 
ter, Chicago, Portland, Seattle, Los 
Angeles, San Francisco, Cleveland, 
Boston, and Philadelphia. The Chicago 
group includes the Civic Opera or- 
ganization and the Women's Sym- 
phony. On the list also are the mag- 
nificent Vienna players, and General 
^Motors' Orchestra. 



1935 tube sales 

* Tube production and 
sales showed an increase of about 18% 
in number of units and 6% in dollar 
value for the first six months of 1935, 
as compared with the same period for 
1934. Figures for the third quarter 
of 1935 are not yet available. First 
and second quarter totals follow : 

1935 Tube Sales (Units and Value) 

1st quarter... 15,247,456 $5,266,500 
2nd quarter... 14,454,219 4,563,800 



1st half 29,701,675 $9,830,300 




Facsimile picture of Italian machine-gunners, Aduiva, Ethiopia, flown from the 
battlefield to Rome, telephotoed to London, then transmitted to U. S. via radio 

facsimile. 



V, 



Radio Today 



Radio laughs last 

* While John J. Karol. 
market research director for CBS, 
was hotly refuting the broadcast mor- 
tality claims of Allen Sykes, eastern 
manager of the American News- 
papers Publishers Association, a con- 
tinuity writer at Columbia was writ- 
ing a 5-minute script on the subject 
which was more mischievous than 
malicious but nevertheless had many 
a spot of truth. 

The sketch was pleasantly pre- 
sented as an item which will "never 
never be broadcast", and so will con- 
tinue to brighten the files of Eadio 
Today, where the daily barrages of 
the radio-press war are forming a 
dismal heap. 

The CBS script has three char- 
acters : "Pa", representing the ANPA, 
"Ma", the magazines, and "Mike", 
the networks. Through 15 pages 
these three conduct a mild brawl in 
Ad-town, corner Main and Media 
streets. The pure logic of the situa- 
tion marks Mike as the winner, since 
his arguments are obviously more 
than a match for the hillbilly phi- 
losophy of the opposition. 

Author of this tiny drama has ably 
mixed his Truth and Comedy; given 
a chance, the sketch would represent 
quite a burn for the befogged statisti- 
cians of the ANPA. 

FHA helps public-address ■ 

* FHA has issued an- 
other special ruling which makes a 
lively business note for radio men 
who manufacture, install, or service 




With rumbles of war abroad, manufacturers see a new radio market developing. 
Picture shows radio-equipped tanks in New York maneuvers. 



public-address systems. Federal fi- 
nancing, under FHA's moderniza- 
tion credit plan, is now available for 
public address equipment in apart- 
ment houses, hotels, offices, hospitals, 
orphanages, colleges, factories, schools, 
and sundry commercial buildings. 
Schools are important because PWA 
is going heavy on them now. 

The ruling, secured by RMA, asks 
that the "permanently built-in regu- 
lations and stipulations" for mod- 
ernization financing of Class A struc- 
tures be followed regularly. Class A 
structures include almost everything 
but private dwellings. 




F red Allen and Portland Hoffa shown with the Johns-Manville "applause machine'' 
■used in NBC's "Town Hall" amateur broadcasts to measure the handclapping. 



Transradio debunks 
"exclusiveness" 

* Promoters of sport 
events will now think twice before 
they guarantee "exclusive broadcast 
rights" to an ambitious sponsor, now 
that Transradio Press Service, with 
the aid of short-wave, has succeeded 
in using such affairs as the Baer- 
Louis fight for its own purposes. 

Transradio uses a portable short- 
wave transmitter, specially designed 
to be inconspicuous and small enough 
to be operated in a single spectator's 
seat. The operator reports the mo- 
ment-by-moment progress of the 
event, and his voice is transmitted to 
a receiver within a few blocks of the 
spot. From there the copy is sup- 
plied to Transradio clients, whether 
transmitted from the Service's sta- 
tion WCX or teletyped. 

Facsimile at Waldorf? 

* Rumor has it that the 
management of the Waldorf-Astoria 
Hotel, New York, has interested it- 
self in facsimile to the extent that 
some 500 sets will be installed in 
rooms there. Story goes that the 
hotel has plans for using a facsimile 
printer for getting programs and an- 
nouncements into its rooms, particu- 
larly when important conventions are 
under way. 

One report is that Waldorf will 
use the facsimile set developed by 
Capt. Otto Fulton, of Fultograph, 
Inc., 342 Madison Ave., but Fulton 
hotly denies the tale. 



October, 1935 



"PUBLIC ENEMIES" OF RADIO 

Whole industry suffers from unwarranted attacks on programs 



* AL CAPOjSTE is in Alcatraz; 
Dillinger is pushing up the daisies in 
a gunman's grave; and Baby-Face 
Kelson is, one hopes, doing the same. 
The Department of Justice has done 
a swell job of cleaning up America's 
public enemies. But now we respect- 
fully call the Department's attention 
(in case they have some machine guns 
getting rusty from under-use) to a 
few of the Public Enemies of Radio, 
which may be listed as follows : 

Radio Enemy No. 1 — 

The publicity-seeking politician who 
knows that attacks on radio will 
get his name into newspaper head- 
lines. 

Radio Enemy No. 2 — 

The disgruntled reformer (getting 
nowhere fast with Prohibition) who 
condemns radio programs in an at- 
tempt to get more free time for him- 
self. 

Radio Enemy* No. 3 — 

The newspaper publisher who pre- 
sents false and distorted "facts" on 
radio advertising. 

Radio Enemy' No. 4 — 

The radio dealer, salesman or ser- 
vice man who though tlessly 
knocks radio programs, or permits 
public knocks to go vmchallenged. 

Radio Enemy No. 5 — 

The high-hat private citizen — a 
branch of the so-called intelligent- 
sia — who once listened to one or 
two programs he didn't happen to 
like, and therefore condemns all 
radio programs. 

Radio Enemy No. 6 — 

The artistically arrogant who 
thinks no program is any good un- 
less it is composed entirely of 
Brahms and Bach. 

Radio Enemy No. 7 — 

The tory of the pre-1776 era who 
wants Government ownership of all 
stations "because England has it." 

Radio Enemy No. 8 — 

The advertiser of medical products 
who has been refused time on the 
air and takes it out in blasts 
against broadcasting. 

Odorous company 

What burns us up, however, is 
Enemy No. 4 up there in that list — 
those unthinking members of the 
radio trade itself who knock radio 
programs and the present broadcast 
set-up. Or, equally as harmful, per- 
mit public statements along the same 
lines to go unanswered. 




There is plenty of proof in the daily 
and weekly radio programs that 
broadcasting always had something to 
interest everybody. Any one who be- 
lieves that "radio programs are get- 
ting lousy" can be controverted with 
an array of varied entertainment un- 
equalled since Antony and Cleopatra 
agitated the teacups of Rome as the 
topic of spicy dispatches from far-off 
Egypt. 

And those who "don't like radio 
because it is so commercialized, my 
dear," and "you nevah heah anything 
like it in England" would look the 
proverbial gift horse so far into the 
mouth that they could see a hundred 
yards out the other end. They forget 
that English listeners pay a yearly 
tax for what competent observers 
have declared is some of the worst 
drivel that ever came out of a loud- 
speaker. And usually, our British 
cousins get only one or two programs 
that you take whether you like it or 
not. One high British broadcasting 



Eimng Galloway Photo 



official is reported to have declared: 
"We in England look upon our jobs 
primarily as educating and uplifting 
our radio listeners." 

Great stuff. How many radio sets 
would be sold if broadcasters in 
America pointed their efforts along 
the same lines ? 

After all, programs are the things 
that sell radio sets. So the radio man 
who desn't wave the flag for present 
programs is the worst Radio Enemy 
of the lot. For he is biting the hand 
that feeds him and that's the worst of 
the seven deadly sins. 

The question we want answered is 
this : "What in heck does any man in 
radio gain by knocking instead of 
boosting American radio programs?" 
By so doing he puts himself imme- 
diately in the same odoriferous class 
as the other Public Enemies of Ra- 
dio and is helping to tear down some- 
thing which every right-thinuing 
radio man wants to protect and build 



10 



Radio Today 



up. He is playing right into the 
hands of the newspapers, reformers, 
politicians, and similar specimens who 
knife radio at every opportunity to 
advance their own selfish interests. 
For the love of Pete, let's quit shoot- 
ing our own lieutenants and start 
popping at the common enemies! 

Misguided, deliberate 

These assorted enemies of radio, 
lacking a happier sport, are going 
out of their way to discredit current 
radio programs; a part of the attack 
is superficial and thoughtless, and the 
rest is misguided but quite deliberate. 
All have been darkly plotting to the 
effect that radio talent is second-rate 
and that our radio program policies 
are unprincipled and messy. 

Some are very casual and highly 
artificial in their attacks, but the 
dyed-in-the-wool trouble raisers 
seriously and energetically try for 
legislation on the subject and issue 
violent mouthings to the press. Some 
of them had sampled a few programs 
and were not impressed; therefore all 
radio programs are worse than worth- 
less. To the rest of us, it is obvious 
that only the most flagrantly unthink- 
ing souk would decide that all broad- 
casters are missing fire because a few 
spotted programs seemed unspectacu- 
lar at first. 

Curiously blind and unsuspecting, 
they try to make out that what few 
civilized programs there are to be 
heard, are uniformly cluttered with 
tiresome and confusing advertising, 
and that the loudspeaker today has 
little to offer except mediocre and off- 
color entertainment mixed with pro- 
longed descriptions of commercial 
items. Theirs is a weary and des- 
perate attempt to find something — 
anything — to complain about. 

Real significance 

Radio critics deliberately discolor 
the real significance of program ap- 
peal, with the result that many deal- 
ers have missed its full value as a 
selling point on retail floors. 

Dramatic possibilities of program 
quality as a set-selling talking point 
have never been realized. Broad- 
casters, fast becoming expert enter- 
tainment stylists, have long realized 
that no one wants a radio receiver 
unless it will produce a genuine thrill, 
of one sort or another. Consequent 
improvement in artistic level and 
running quality has been phenomenal. 
Courtesy, dignity and good taste gov- 
ern the announcements, and messages 
are delivered with neatness and skill, 
avoiding repetition and dull details. 

October, 1935 



Today s Programs Bring Happiness and Inspiration 
to 80,000,000 Listeners and 20,000,000 Homes. 




RECEIVERS TODAY 



* XEYER before has the passing 
of a Xew York Radio Show left the 
trade with such a wealth of sales- 
producing features. Every manufac- 
turer has introduced numerous novel- 
ties and improvements, and in pre- 
senting them has coined catch-phrases 
to engage the public's attention. 
Looking back on the Show, one re- 
members such terms as — Tone-tested 
resonator (Grunow), Sentry box and 
permaliner (General Electric), Acous- 
tic clarifiers (Philco), and Overtone 
amplifier (Zenith). 

A few more might be listed — 
Ferrodyne chassis (Stewart-Warner), 
CentrOmatic radio (Bosch), Harmo- 
nized unit (Emerson). And there 
are many more. 

Cabinets 

The most apparent improvement in 
the new receivers is in cabinet treat- 
ment. The cabinets are more elabo- 
rate, yet leaning to modernistic style. 
The consoles are legless, sitting close 
to the floor. The finish on even the 
lowest-priced sets is excellent. Em- 
erson has introduced a line of table 
receivers which are enclosed and fin- 
ished on both the front and rear, 
suitable for use on a table in the 
center of the room. 

An ebony black console with satin 
finish is being featured by Zenith. 
Walter Teague has designed two 
unique models for Sparton; one is the 
Triolian Deluxe, a magnificent ma- 
hogany console trimmed with satin 
gold ; the other, the Nocturne, was il- 
lustrated in Radio Today for Septem- 
ber, page 12. 

Individual scales 

Tuning the new receivers has been 
greatly simplified. Dials have indi- 
vidually-lighted scales or pointers, or 
one-scale at a time arrangements. 
Zenith employs a black full-vision 
dial nine inches in diameter on the 
highest-priced models and a six-inch 
one . with the others. Dual tuning 
ratio and split-second indicator give 
ease of tuning. The various bands 
are illuminated in colors and con- 
trolled by the wave changing switch. 

"Slide rule tuning" featured by 
G-E, utilizes several scales printed on 
a cylindrical form. The form re- 
volves to a different position for each 
band, showing but one scale. The 
dual ratio vernier is unique — slow 
speed is obtained over any narrow 



region by reversing the rotation of 
the tuning knob, a full turn again 
engages the high-speed tuning. 

Atwater Kent and RCA have dials 
which show but one scale at a time, 
the movement of the scale being con- 
trolled by the wave-band switch. A-K 
uses a rubber drive; dual speed is 
obtained by a vertical displacement 
of the tuning knob. RCA has a 
planetary slow-speed drive which is 
engaged by pulling out the tuning- 
knob a short distance. 

Separate pointers 

A separate pointer for each range 
is the arrangement devised by Bosch. 
An airplane type dial is used. For 
each band a different indicator is il- 
luminated which points only to the 
band in use. The result is achieved 
by having colored bulbs behind arrow- 
shaped openings. A split-second 
arrangement is also provided. Philco 
employs a glowing arrow which points 
to the band in use; but the scale, not 
the arrow, moves. 

Cathode-ray tuning 

The development of the cathode- 
ray tube has given the manufacturers 
a revolutionary means of indicating 
proper tuning. Three of the exhibi- 
tors at the show equipped their more 
expensive models with these indica- 
tors. RCA calls it the Magic eye; 
Sparton has labelled it Viso-glo tun- 
ing, while Pilot merely uses the de- 
scriptive term cathode-ray tuning. 

Many other manufacturers are uti- 
lizing meters or shadowgraphs to in- 




Receiver with telephone-dial tuning 
• developed in Germany. 



dicate precise tuning. In fact prac- 
tically all of the higher-priced models 
have visual tuning. Grunow employs 
the Signal beacon, which is nothing 
more than a beat oscillator. By tun- 
ing for a low pitch and then turning 
off the oscillator, the station is prop- 
erly tuned in. Claim is made that it 
is especially effective when tuning for 
weak short-wave stations. 

Unit construction 

Keeping pace with the appeals to 
the public, the engineers have made 
a major step forward in the principle 
of "unit type" of construction. Elimi- 
nation of long leads ■ and numerous 
solderings has increased the efficiency 
of the all-wave receivers. In the G-E 
sentry box and Bosch's "Centromatic" 
unit, the tuning condenser, coils, and 
coil switches are grouped into a sin- 
gle unit. There are no leads to the 
coils for they are mounted directly 
on the switch terminals. A similar 
arrangement is used in the 8- and 
12-tube Emerson receivers. 

Better condensers 

Tuning condensers have been im- 
proved. The oscillator section is 
made with greater spacing than the 
others, extra plates being added to 
maintain equal capacities. The wider 
spacing tends to eliminate effects of 
vibration and results in a greater 
permanence of dial settings. 

Some of the manufacturers adopt- 
ing this condenser are : Stromberg 
Carlson, G-E, A-K, and Bosch. 
Atwater Kent has an unusual con- 
denser made in two sections ; two of 
the sections are used in parallel for 
low frequency ranges, the large sec- 
tion alone for medium, and the small 
section for the highest range. This 
arrangement limits the frequency 
coverage per coil and makes for easier 
tuning at high frequencies. G-E has 
introduced an air dielectric padding 
condenser for use both in the high- 
frequency and intermediate stages; 
its outstanding feature is permanence 
of setting irrespective of age and 
humidity. 

"Hi fi" 

Anticipating the public's demand 
for something new, a number of the 
manufacturers are featuring high- 
fidelity reception in the more expen- 
sive models. 

The usual method of changing from 
normal to high fidelity is accom- 
plished by varying the coupling of 
the i.f. stages. A system has been de- 
vised by Bosch, whereby the tuning 
shadowgraph is turned off in the high 



12 



Radio Today 



fidelity position. This feature re- 
quires that the tuning be done in the 
normal position, insuring true re- 
production. 

In their Model 1241 Grunow utilize 
a specially-designed resonating baffle 
with three speakers. Two high fre- 
quency speakers are fed from a chan- 
nel supplying 3 watts, while 12 watts 
is supplied to a low frequency speaker. 
A response from 40 to 10,000 cycles 
is obtained. Sparton also utilizes a 
similar arrangement of three speakers 
but driven from a single amplifier 
with a cross-over network. 

Absorbers 

In an effort to overcome the effect 
of baffle resonance Philco engineers 
have designed what they term "acous- 
tic clarifiers." These are cones which 
look like dummy speakers; their pur- 
pose is to absorb energy and damp the 
baffle and cabinet at resonance, thereby 
eliminating all traces of barrel-like 
boom. A single speaker is employed 
which has a specially processed center 
which handles the highs while the 
outer section reproduces the low notes. 

Two low frequency reproducers are 
incorporated in the Zenith Strato- 
sphere in addition to the high-register 
speaker to give a "dimensional tone." 
Fidelity of response is varied by 
changing the coupling in the i.f. 
stages. 

Artificial baffle 

The engineering staff of Stromberg 
Carlson has gone after the problem 
of wide-range sound, "hammer and 
tongs," and designed the acoustical 
labyrinth. This is an artificial method 
of obtaining an extremely large baffle 
for bass notes. 

Stewart- Warner's high fidelity re- 
ceiver features a curvilinear speaker 
— oval shaped instead of round. The 
reproducer together with an acousti- 
cally designed cabinet is said to add 
an additional octave of response. The 
band width is not adjustable. 

An electronic tone control is em- 
ployed by Fada. The control is auto- 
matic in operation, and when the re- 
ceiver is working with a high gain, 
the high response of the receiver is 
decreased. In this manner the noise 
usually present on distance reception 
is greatly decreased. 

Practically all of the better re- 
ceivers have built-in line filters to 
minimize noise and to eliminate sta- 
tion pick-up via the power lines. 
Better shielding, both of parts and 
tubes, is the general practice. And a 
number of the sets have separate tone 
controls. 



TUBES TODAY 




Welding metal-tube shells in the Raytheon factory. The complete assemblies are 
placed upside down in the rotating vselder table. 



150,000 metal tubes daily 

* SHOETAGES in metal-tube 
production have been holding up re- 
ceiver-factory early-Fall schedules, 
but during October apparently real 
progress is being made in catching up 
with metal-tube orders. Prospects 
now are that within a month or more 
the industry will be getting most of 
its metal-tube requirements. 

Metal-tube production by all makers 
is now estimated to be at the rate of 
150,000 tubes daily, for the month of 
October. Not only has manufacture 
been speeded, but the ratio of rejects 
has been reduced so that more usable 
units are coming through. 

In some plants, even today, spoiled 
tubes run as high as 35 to 40 per cent, 
while in factories with longer metal 
experience, this figure has been con- 
siderably cut down. Metal rejects are 
approaching the usual figure for glass 
rejects. 



Better shoivings on re-test 

Complaints of leaks and gas devel- 
oping after tubes have received their 
initial factory tests are regarded by 
the metal-tube production men to be 
like the reports of Mark Twain's 
death — "greatly exaggerated." Never- 
theless, the factories are taking pre- 
cautions to re-test their metal tubes 
before shipping. This means that the 
units receive a second check within 
24 hours to one week after the first 
test — one week being the maximum 



time that a desperate shipping depart- 
ment will permit the tubes to lie in 
the stockroom. Indeed, most of the 
tubes "start travelling" in 24 to 48 
hours. 

The metal-tube people declare that 
the whole production problem is now 
well in hand, and that by November, 
metal tubes will be available to meet 
every practical requirement of the set 
makers. They report also that the 
set manufacturers are getting no more 
service calls on metal-tube sets in 
use, than on corresponding glass-tube 
sets. 



Glass-tube guarantees 

* Vigorously presenting 
its opposition to the metal tube at this 
time, the Philco organization threw 
down a definite challenge in the form 
of a guarantee which, during the 
New York radio show, it advertised 
locally in newspapers and by circu- 
lars, as follows : 

"Philco guarantees greater per- 
formance. (Tube for tube . . . And 
even more.) 

"Philco radios with glass tubes are 
guaranteed to — 

1. Outperform radios with the same 
number of metal tubes. 

2. Outperform radios with one to 
three additional metal tubes. 

3. Outperform radios with metal 
tubes which cost much more 
money. 



October, 1935 



13 



fcfi 



ON THE AIR" 



Coming features stir interest in receivers 



NBC toasts listeners 

* The time of stars con- 
tinues at NBC; many of the ablest 
artists of the nation are in the pro- 
gram flashes from the web which 
likes its features. New schedules 
contain scores of names which have 
earned international applause in one 
way or another. 

Elegant General Motors concerts, 
which returned to the air October 6, 
will come through with additional 
not-to-be-missed features for Sunday 
nights. GM entertainment airs on a 
WEAF web of 64 stations, including 
(Janada, and uses the extraordinary 
show-building technique which made 
the program one of the leaders last 
season. Schedule for the first part ot 
the series : Mischa Elrnan, violinist, 
October 13; Paul Robeson, baritone, 
October 20; Rosa Ponselle, soprano, 
October 27; Jascha Heifetz, violinist, 
November 3; Jose Iturbi, pianist, 
November 10; and Rose Bampton, 
contralto, November 17. Guest-con- 
ducting the GM symphony orchestra 
through the series will be such em- 
inents as Toscanini, Sir Henry 
Beecham, Stokowski, Stravinsky, and 
Bruno Walter. 

Next stratosphere ascent to be 
made from a spot near Rapid City, 
S. D., is expected within a fortnight 





Symphonic stylist, Stokowski. 



Jepson of the Golden Horseshoe 

and will be described over NBC nets 
exclusively. Commander Stevens 
and Pilot Anderson, gentlemen in the 
gondola, will make their observations 
in a RCA-Victor transmitter in the 
balloon itself, and remarks will be 
relayed from local short-waves to the 
XBC networks. 

President and Mrs. Franklin D. 
Roosevelt and nearly 50 other im- 
portants will be heard on NBC nets 
October 15, 16 and 17, speaking from 
the sessions of the New York Herald 
Tribune Forum on Current Problems 
at the Waldorf Astoria, N. Y. C. 
Remarks will be broadcast from 
Washington, Paris, London, Brussels, 
Chicago, Panama, and Madison. 
Names include Cordell Hull, La- 
Guardia, John G. Winant, Ogden 
Mills, John Erskine, Irita Van Do- 
ran, Col. Frank Knox, David Sarnoff, 
Dorothy Thompson, and others. 

For the chillun' 

Dr. Walter D'amrosclrs coast-to- 
coast feature titled the "NBC Music 
Appreciation Hour," is back on Fri- 
day air waves and will continue on 
combined WEAF-WJZ nets until 
March 27. Series is a part of the 
school-season set-up, being a string 
of lecture concerts graded to suit 
listeners from the third year of ele- 
mentary school, through high school 
and college. Audience for the fea- 
ture is estimated at 7,000,000 school 
children. 



Enormous interest has been worked 
up in the new Sunday afternoon 
WJZ series of RCA-sponsored "Mag- 
ic Key" programs, in which artists 
are "co-featured" with technical de- 
velopments in the radio world. No- 
table aspect is that many of the big- 
time performances will be broadcast 
from Berlin, Paris, Hawaii, Vienna, 
and South America, as well as all key 
cities of U. S. Starred in the series 
are such artists as Kirsten Flagstad, 
Lauritz Melchoir, Lotte Lehman, 
Rose Bampton, Helen Jepson and 
Martinelli of the "Met" ; Sergei 
Koussevitzky and the Boston Sym- 
phony; Stokowski and the Philadel- 
phia Symphony; Paul Whiteman, 
Rudy Vallee, Albert Spalding, Wal- 
ter Damroseh, Conrad Thibault, and 
Fatts Waller. Other luminaries will 
be listed also, and the favorite dance 
bands will be in. NB commentator 
John B. Kennedy will cover the world 
by plane to add news flashes to the 
matinees. 

Jumbo airs 

"Jumbo" the much-discussed spec- 
tacle to be produced by Billy Rose 
at the N. Y. Hippodrome, will be 
aired via WEAF net Tuesday nights, 
opening October 29. Doors will be 
closed while the cast broadcasts. Ex- 
travaganza was written by the Hecht- 
McArthur team, using a circus treat- 
ment. 

Ruth Etting and Red Nichols or- 
chestra will open a new Kellogg Col- 
lege Prom, WJZ, October 25. 

NBC's notable educational feature 
with the gingerbread tag, "America's 
Town Meetings" will start October 
31 on the WJZ net. Thursday eve- 
nings, the head-line statesmen, edi- 
tors, educators, and politicians will 
air their views on the constitution, 
world peace, inflation, and associated 
matters. 

Further cooperation with the Brit- 
ish Broadcasting Corp. will allow a 
feature broadcast Nov. 6 of the wed- 
ding of Lady Alice Montagu-Douglas- 
Scott to the Duke of Gloucester, 3rd 
son of George V. Broadcast starts at 
6 :15 p.m. on WJZ. 

Extra ! 

* Largest network broad- 
cast in radio history is set for Oct. 27, 
when the No. 1 transmitters in 31 
countries air an international feature, 
"Youth Sings Across Borders." Youths 
of each country will contribute a sam- 
ple of folk music. Festival is arranged 
by International Broadcasting Union 
and both NBC and CBS nets will 
pick up big sections of it. 



14 



Radio Today 




Sunday-nigh t partners-in-farce 

CBS serenades fans 

* Columbia's plans for 
forthcoming programs continue to 
follow the fancy sun-burst pattern; 
the new announcements keep the ex- 
citement of big names and accent the 
work of the most-beloved enter- 
tainers. Program summary this 
month should be headed "Art on the 
Air Waves." 

Thursday night's WABC "To 
Arms for Peace" series sponsored by 
Squibb's and World Peaceways is 
the program which the Women's Na- 
tional Radio Committee hastened to 
rate "the best radio program which 
has ever been staged." Each pro- 
gram starts out to feature a musical 
star, a well-known speaker, and the 
work of a famed writer. Remainder 
of the schedule is : Richard Bonelli, 
General Johnson, and (probably) 
Fannie Hurst for October 17 ; (no 
program on October 24), George 
Gershwin, .William Green, and 
"Strike Up the Band" on October 31; 
Lotte Lehman, Prof. Robert Milli- 
ken, and John Erskine for November 
7; Albert Spaulding and S. S. Van 
Dine for November 14; Rosa Pon- 
selle and Zone Gale for November 21 ; 
Nelson Eddy and Heywood Broun 
for November 28 ; Elizabeth Reth- 
berg and Clare Rummer for Decem- 
ber 5 ; Grete Stueckgold and Sher- 
wood Anderson for December 12 ; 
Jose Iturbi and Behrman, Barry or 
Clifford Oddets for December 19. 
Deems Taylor as master of cere- 
monies and Howard Barlow's sym- 
phony are regular features. 

American School of the Air, into 
which OBS has paraded several pleas- 
ant features, opens its coast-to-coast 
airings on October 21, for 5 broad- 
casts weekly. Instruction this time 
will include geography, history, lit- 
erature, elementary science, music, 



vocational guidance, and current 
events. Sections on art and poetry 
will receive a heavy accent this year. 

Heavy concerts 

Columbia has begun its happy 
hook-up with the Philharmonic Sym- 
phony Society, broadcasts coming 
from Carnegie Hall as usual on Sun- 
day afternoons. This, the Society's 6th 
season, runs to April 12, and the 29 
concerts will be divided among the 
ace composers, Otto Klemperor, Sir 
Thomas Beecham, Arturo Toscanini, 
and Hans Lango. Ernest Schelling 
will direct the Saturday morning 
children's concerts at the Hall be- 
ginning January 11 and also booked 
for CBS in a 115-station net. 

The thundering "March of Time" 
scores heavily in listener interest 
with its pointed reports on the Italo- 
Ethiopian affair. Mondays through 
Fridays with only 15 minutes per 
broadcast (10:30 to 10:45 p.m.), the 
program directors accomplish a keen 
and powerful summary effect which 
appears to be level in quality and 
which really drags in the fans. 

"The Cavalcade of America," 
which had its premiere October 9 on 
the WABC net, will feature a group 
of celebrities from Hollywood and 
Broadway in its Wednesday night 
dramatizations of major moments in 
American history. 

Eddie Cantor's rapid Sunday eve- 
ning series will introduce several 
brisk entertainment devices besides 
the flamboyant comics with which his 
programs are already identified. 
Early innovation will be a contest 



among guest orchestras, winners of 
which will be decided by listener re- 
sponse. Conductors will include such 
Hollywood favorites as Gus Arnheim, 
Anson Weeks, Jimmy Grier, Phil 
Ohman, and Georgie Stoll. Cantor 
will have a trophy for the winning 
orchestra. 

MBS adds features 

* The studied excellence 
of WOR's big feature, "Master Mu- 
sicians" is under way as a Sunday 
evening favorite. Coming pianists 
on the series will include Mischa 
Levitzky, Poldi Mildner, John Pow- 
ell, Adele Marcus. Jan Smeterling, 
Frank Sheridan, and Henri Deering. 
Selected violinists are Sascha Jacob- 
sen, Eddy Brown, and Max Rabinoff. 
Program's big-time cellists are Maria 
Rosanoff and Joseph Schuster, and 
the famed harpist, Carlos Salzedo, 
will play. 

The stunning Spanish soprano, 
Corinna Mura, is back to WOR pro- 
grams. Senorita had a trip to Ven- 
ezuela, where she did special short 
and long wave broadcasts from Cara- 
cas. American Minister Nicholson, 
by the way, threw a dazzling recep- 
tion for La Mura while she was in 
Caracas. Beatrice De Sylvara will 
start telling "How to Be Charming" 
over WOR on October 21, on a new 
series for Phillips Chemical set for 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday 
mornings. Ted Fio Rito and his or- 
chestra, playing at the Netherlands 
Plaza Hotel in Cincinnati, have be- 
gun Thursday night broadcasts with 
MBS. 




No bumping of heads among WOR musicians; the new streamline "eight-ball" 
mike picks up sound from any direction. 



October, 1935 



15 





TRADE UP! 



Merchandiser talks about selling higher-priced sets 



By William Alley 
Contributing Editor, Radio Today 

* PBE-SEASON talk about bet- 
ter business this Fall and Winter is 
proving to have a sound foundation. 
The season so far is seeing more 
people coming into radio stores to 
"look around" than has been the case 
since '28 and '29. 

As radio's strong selling months 
swing into action, several definite 
merchandising facts are becoming 
apparent. 

First — ''Store traffic" is up at least 
30 per cent as revealed by a check- 
up of dealers in many sections. That 
means more shoppers, more potential 
buyers, are coming in for a ''look- 
see" at the new receivers. 

Second — General business is on the 




up-grade; more people are working; 
money is beginning to loosen up. 
That means the shoppers coming in 
are in a better buying mood. 

Third — There is a definite trend to- 
ward the higher-priced sets, brought 
about by the generally improved busi- 
ness situation. Last Fall the $10-20 
midgets and the $75 consoles were 
the big sellers. This year dealers re- 
port the $25-35 price range for small 
sets and the $100 average price for 
consoles are getting the largest share 
of public interest. 

"Metal" curiosity 

Curiosity about metal tubes and 
advertising of new tuning devices and 
unique cabinet designs are largely 
responsible for the increased number 
of radio shoppers this Fall. Dealers 
are making definite plans to take ad- 
vantage of these favorable factors. 
Two steps are important : (1) ar- 
rangement of stock and displays to 
catch the utmost interest and atten- 
tion; and (2) pointing sales efforts 
toward selling the higher-priced 
models. 

With public interest this year ap- 
pearing to center on the medium- 
priced consoles, most dealers are giv- 
ing these sets the featured "leader" 
location. Usually this is immediately 
to the right of the entrance, following 
the old merchandising belief that 
most people instinctively glance to 
the right rather than to the left when 
they enter a store or department. 

Placing your featured leader up 
front and to the right is simply in- 
surance that you will have something 
there that stands the best chance of 
catching the interest of the majority 
of people who come in. 

$100 consoles 

Bearing in mind, also, that the 
smart merchandising move this Fall 
is to place the most sales effort be- 
hind the $100 consoles, dealers are 
arranging their set displays to make 
it easy for salesmen to "trade up." 

This is best accomplished by a more 
or less systematic grouping of sets 
according to price range. Few cus- 
tomers can make head or tail out of 
a conglomeration of all kinds of sets 
mixed together, nor can a salesman 



do an intelligent job of selling under 
those circumstances. 

To make it easy, therefore, for the 
customer to come to a decision, and 
to assist salesmen in trading up, sets 
this season should probably be 
grouped somewhat as follows : 

First, right 

First as you enter, and to the right, 
one or two models of your featured 
leader; next, lowest price group; next, 
medium price group, and finally your 
higher price groups. In demonstrat- 
ing, therefore, salesmen can show the 
lowest price group (when necessary) 
and progress to the higher priced sets 
without delay or confusion. Many 
dealers using this type of store ar- 
rangement state that one of its big 
advantages is that the salesman can 
dispose of the cheaper sets easily and 
quickly and concentrate on the high- 
er priced sets without having the cus- 
tomer's attention distracted by a 
cheaper set close by. 

Interior displays 

In arranging your store interior 
this Fall, more than usual attention 
should be paid to display material. 
Manufacturers have some of the most 
attractive and attention-compelling 
display material this season than 
they've ever had before. 

Wise dealers won't let this oppor- 
tunity slip by. A few dollars invested 
in display material this season will 
prove well worth while because of the 
increased public interest in radio 
which is already evident. 

Use such material to the best ad- 
vantage, however. Don't, for example, 
put a receiver piece display up on the 
counter with little or no relationship 
to the set it advertises. Place it close 
to the set so that there can be no 
question as to the definite tie-up be- 
tween the two. Your featured leaders, 
particularly, should have descriptive 
displays immediately alongside them. 
Experience has shown time and again 
that display pieces catch and concen- 
trate attention on the models you 
want to push. 

Point sales effort 

Too much emphasis cannot be laid 
this season on pointing the efforts of 
your salesmen toward "trading up." 



16 



Radio Today 



While store arrangement and displays 
are important in accomplishing this 
purpose, the real test comes of course 
in the actual face-to-face interviews 
with prospects. 

Nobody, naturally, can tell a -sales- 
man exactly what to say and how to 
say it once a sales interview gets 
under way. But there are many 
things a salesman can do to trade a 
customer up from a low price set to 
a better one. 

Don't knock 

For instance, if the salesman has 
determined that the customer is pri- 
marily interested in a low-price set, 
there is no point in not demonstrat- 
ing it. But it is not necessary to 
make any attempt to sell it if the 
salesman believes there is a chance 
of switching to a better set. 

There is no point, either, in knock- 
ing the smaller set because, after 
demonstrating the higher-priced set, 
the salesman may find it necessary to 
come back to the smaller set. Con- 
sequently, the demonstration of the 
smaller set should be indifferent 
enough not to sell it, but sufficient to 
come back to it and make the sale if 
the better set can not be sold. 

Dealers this Fall, therefore, are in- 
structing their salesmen to demon- 
strate the smaller set if that's what 
the customer wants, but to switch im- 
mediately afterwards to a better 
model. 

Mention "neiv" 

To take the customer's attention 
away from the small set and concen- 
trate it on the higher priced model is 
merely a question of mentioning some 
new feature of the larger set in which 
the customer will be interested and 
which the smaller model does not in- 



clude. There are plenty of such fea- 
tures this season — metal tubes, "mag- 
ic eye" tuning, short-wave reception, 
unusual cabinet designs, other special 
features — any one of which may be 
called upon to provide the excuse for 
switching the demonstration to the 
larger unit of sale. 

As soon as the salesman has men- 
tioned this new feature, he should 
lead the customer entirely away from 
the smaller set and concentrate upon 
the higher-priced model, which, as 
previously pointed out, should be lo- 
cated at a distance from the small set 
so as to provide no opportunity for 
the customer to see or to be reminded 
about the cheaper model. 

Then, in demonstrating the larger 
unit, the salesman should bring to 
bear all of the sales guns which he 
has not used in showing the smaller 
set. Of course, comparisons between 
the two sets are to be avoided because 
the salesman cannot afford to kill the 
sale of the small set. He may have 
to come back to it, but should come 
back to it only if he must in order to 
avoid losing the customer entirely. 

Much better 

The salesman's demonstration of 
the larger set should indicate its su- 
periority without a direct comparison. 
None is needed if the salesman does 
a good job of selling the better set. 

Naturally, its better appearance is 
self-evident, so no direct comparison 
needs to be made there. Simply call- 
ing attention to the cabinet and 
stressing its beautiful lines and de- 
sign will cause the customer to make 
his own mental comparison without 
any help from the salesman. 

In almost every case, it is likely 
that the larger unit will have one or 
two, perhaps more, points of obvious 
superiority over the cheaper model. 



This may be in the cabinet, in tone 
quality, in selectivity, in special "gad- 
gets," in wider frequency range, or 
similar features. Whatever points 
the larger set has which the smaller 
set lacks, are the points that should 
be emphasized. 

The more points which the sales- 
man can build up to a "No" answer 
when the customer asks, "Does the 
other set have that?" the more likely 
is the customer to swing over def- 
initely to the higher-priced model. 

And such points must, of course, be 
co-related with the customer's desires 
and preferences. 



Ear for music 

If the customer has an ear for 
music and is able to appreciate good 
tone quality, then the better tone of 
the larger set is the main point to 
bring out. But if the customer can 
make little differentiation in the tone 
quality of different sets, certainly 
better tone quality is obviously a 
dangerous point to concentrate upon, 
and a direct tonal comparison 
avoided. 

Or, the customer or his wife may 
exclaim at once about the beauty of 
the cabinet. This should be the sales- 
man's cue for a strong selling talk 
on the appearance of the set and the 
design of the cabinet, bringing out 
the obvious superiority over the 
smaller set without saying so in ac- 
tual words. 

Every higher-priced set is bound to 
have some selling points over lower- 
priced models in which the smaller 
set either is clearly weaker or does not 
include at all. Depending, of course, 
on the individual sets which are be- 
ing demonstrated, these are the points 
which the salesman should look for 
and on which he should concentrate 
(To page 35) 




October, 1935 



17 



ITH THE BROADCASTERS 



WMAQ's anti-fading 
antenna 

* With an increase from 
5,000 to 50,000 watts and a new anti- 
fading antenna designed by the en- 
gineering department of the National 
Broadcasting Company, WMAQ, the 
Chicago Daily News station, presents 
interesting novel features in broad- 
casting practice. 

The station's new transmitter, lo- 
cated at Bloomingdale, 111., is a 50,- 
000-watt unit embodying improve- 
ments which assure a wide response, 
faithful transmission of all musical 
tones, and the reduction of distortion 
to a new low level. 

The most interesting innovation, 
however, is the new antenna with its 
"umbrella top" designed to give high 
efficiency and reduce fading. One of 
the novel features of this antenna is 
the method of adjusting and con- 
trolling its performance by the special 
device near the top. In conjunction 
with the usual tests made at the an- 
tenna itself, the engineers have made 
field-intensity measurements in dis- 




Eighty feet beloiv the top of WMAQ's 
tower is located the compartment con- 
taining the anti-fading control mech- 
anism. 



tant areas where the fading would 
take place, and find great improve- 
ment resulting. Towering 490 feet 
into the air, the antenna itself is of 
uniform cross section throughout, 
triangular in shape. One side of this 
triangle is eight feet, making the 
tower equivalent to a square struc- 
ture less than six feet on one side. 
It is supported by two sets of guy 
wires which include at intervals 39 
massive insulators. 

Research into fading and its rela- 
tionship to antenna design by NBC 
engineers under the supervision of 
O. B. Hanson, chief engineer, has dis- 
closed the importance of keeping the 
cross-sections of these steel aerials 
uniform throughout their length. 

In addition to the uniform cross 
sections, a current-control device is 
located 80 feet below the top of the 
antenna which has the effect of rais- 
ing the electrical height at will. It is 
believed that WMAQ is the first sta- 
tion to have an antenna employing 
uniform cross sections throughout, 
without the use of external wires to 
simulate this condition and possess- 
ing the current-controlling means to 
operate in conjunction with each 
other. 

A comprehensive system of ground 
wires leading from the base of the 
antenna, is plowed into the earth at 
a definite depth. In this network of 
wires more than 60,000 feet of cop- 
per ribbon is used and to minimize 
further the losses, a network of ex- 
panded copper screen was installed 
under the antenna. 

Sub-committee to give RRB 
its start 

+ Radio Research Bu- 
reau, to be set up by the National 
Association of Broadcasters, the 
American Association of Advertising 
Agencies, and the Association of Na- 
tional Advertisers, will trust its early 
destinies to a sub-committee ap- 
pointed September 19 at a meeting of 
the three-way leaders. Committee is 
to locate $250,000 somewhere and get 
the project on its way toward audit- 
ing radio circulation. Next we hear 
will be the grand low-down on listener 
counts, it appears, regardless of how 
many years it requires to assemble it. 
since the Bureau leaders decided to 
withhold news of ius organization 
steps until the affair was definitely in 
operation. 



Milkman's matinee 

* Sleepless listeners 
numbering a million or more make 
up the audience of the novel WNEW 
(Newark, N. J.) "Milkman's Mati- 
nee." Starting on August 2, this all- 
night program of recorded music has 
won a following which wires from 
three to four hundred requests nightly 
over the studio's Postal Telegraph 
machine and sends letters from New 
Zealand, Alaska, and Hudson Bay. 

The broadcast from 2 to 1 A.M. 
reaches not only D'X fans but a large 
working audience. Drivers of radio- 
equipped taxicabs have written to 
thank the station for keeping them 
awake all night, increasing the num- 
ber of fares. Taverns tune in the 
musical entertainment and wire fre- 
quent requests, glad to get their 
names on the air. Workmen in one 
New Jersey factory shut down their 
machines for three minutes one night 
to hear Announcer Stanley Shaw play 
their request number. 

Hospitals have reason to thank the 
station. The Seaside Hospital in 
Waterford, Conn., found a saving in 
narcotics because the music, relayed 
from a central receiver through in- 
dividual earphones, soothed sleepless 
patients. This radio service during 
the hardest hours for sufferers may 
increase hospital installations. 

WBS looks up 

* Last news from the 
sumptuous new quarters of the World 
Broadcasting System, at 711 Fifth 
Avenue (former NBC layout), has 
the sun-up note of improving busi- 
ness, as the able WBS execs con- 
tinue to spot new quality programs 
on new stations. Having cornered a 
transcription process which is ob- 
viously tops in the racket, WBS de- 
serves credit for bringing quality ar- 
tists to outlying areas. 

Some smash-up! 

* John Lewandowski, one 
of WJAY's foreign program an- 
nouncers claims some kind of a 
strong man record but is short of 
purse as a result. He wrecked six 
trains, three autos, a buzz saw, and 
numerous other large pieces of ma- 
chinery. Yes, he tipped over the 
station's cabinet in which sound ef- 
fect records are kept, and broke eight 
out of twenty. His pay check will 
be severely nicked. 



18 



Radio Today 



SALES IDEAS THAT WORKED 



Servicing spoits broadcasts 

* Interdependence among 
dealers, broadcasters, and service 
men is recognized in St. Louis, Mo., 
when the big ball games are on. Stix, 
Baer & Fuller featured an ad with 
the line, "Have your radio renewed 
for the ball games and other sports 
features !" Shrewdly timed, the ad 
suggested phoning for Stix complete 
service, including "Check tubes, 
check and clean volume control, bal- 
ance set, check pilot light, check an- 
tenna and ground connections, clean 
tuning condensers, and check loose 
connections." 



Metal tube blessed event 

* The appearance of the 
new metal tubes was used by the Bing 
Company, Cleveland, Ohio, as suffi- 
cient inspiration for a special store 
event. The advantages of the new 
tubes were pointed out and shoppers 
were invited to special store demon- 
strations which demonstrated, ac- 
cording to Bing promoters, a transi- 
tion in radio reception. 

Dealer sponsors club 

* Powers, radio retailer, 
of Portland, Oregon, adroitly picked 
a single day to run the only 
ad on the radio page of The Ore- 
gonian. The ad showed a new world- 
wave, floor-type console, and an- 
nounced that "a free six-months' 
membership in the Western World 
Wave Club will be awarded with each 
purchase." Knowing where to stop, 
the ad copy carried no explanation of 
what a membership in a World Wave 
Club meant, exactly. 

Salesmen eat 

+ Climaxing a sales con- 
test, the Xew York Wmditzer organi- 
zation staged a successful banquet. 
Purpose of the contest was to stimu- 
late a competitive spirit between 
members of the sales organization. 
Those who failed to make their quota, 
in addition to having to pay their 
way to the banquet, took a good- 
natured riding from the rest of the 
staff. Food was served on paper 
plates by a waiter who practically 
dropped the food on the plates — 
service for them was almost nil. 



Knife and spoon were the only tools. 

To make the humiliation more 
complete, and it was taken in great 
spirit of fun, small pots were awarded 
to the losers. 

Success of the plan is witnessed by 
the fact that the store's business 
topped the month of September for a 
year ago by more than one-half. 

Radio and tire special 

* Transit Badio Co., St. 
Louis, Mo., gave considerable ad em- 
phasis to special combination of four 
tires and auto radio, sold together 
for a limited period. As a summer 
promotion, offer was made at a fea- 
ture figure, and the shop offered in- 
stallation "while you wait." The 
stunt was conspicuous for its use of 
the complete set of tires. 

Seasonal windows 

* With public interest in 
radio on the upbeat, your windows as- 
sume greater importance in attracting 
attention to your store in particular. 

There are many types of interest- 
compelling displays, all of which serve 
their purpose when they stop people, 
make them look, and cause them to 
talk. 

Try these SEASONAL displays: 



"A new harvest" 

A shock of corn, a sheaf of wheat, 
a few large pumpkins. 

A 1936 radio, a map of the world, 
and ribbons leading from the dial to 
shortwave stations in the remote 
corners of the map. 

College football 

A miniature stadium, and all that 
goes with it, the color, the parked 
cars, etc., and a boy and his father 
listening to a new radio. 

A large scoreboard on which the 
results of the important national and 
local games are posted. 

Thanksgiving 

A live turkey, a new radio, an en- 
larged photograph of smoke pouring 
from factory smokestacks. "Some- 
thing to be thankful for." 

"Short wave" window 

Use a large large flat map of the 
world for the background. Frame the 
map with a dozen or so pictures, each 
one characteristic of the country, or 
the people, in which a short wave sta- 
tion that can be received is located. 
Fit these photos so they can be seen 
one at a time only, when illuminated, 
and control the lighting with a rotary 
llasher. Connect each photo by a 
small ribbon to its country on the 
map and to dial of set in foreground. 




"Short-wave reception" features tins attractive window display of the Coast Music 
Company, Los Angeles. 



October, 1935 



19 




PIONEERING PAYS EVERYBODY! 

Don't let anyone tell you that pioneering 
isn't rewarded! Look at the great indus- 
tries of today, and you will find in each 
one of them just a few names of men 
and companies who had the vision and 
strength to pioneer and to win tremen- 
dous rewards for doing so. In radio, the 
great pioneer is RCA, which more than 
any other has been the creator of the 
radio of yesterday and of today, and is 
now developing in its laboratories the 
radio of tomorrow. This pioneering 
genius not only has made the Radio 
Corporation of America great, but it has 
made it possible for many other men and 
firms to make vast sums, and has brought 
new delight in radio to all the public. 



uot 






ffi*«233*2E* 



sV 



tea" 



iD e5 \ , ,«at" 









«oX 



# 



An cr 



fc« 



.V 



attva 






t Ve 



,o° N 



.^^O.* 



3> 



-p t Vce 



t 0»°' 



ut 



tv° 



tVce- 



cum Safes f&c&k&f 







ISING FAST! 



See the figures that show what RCA 
Victor is doing for its dealers: 

Average RCA Victor console 
sale this season to date 



$ 



148 5 



o 



Average RCA Victor console 
sale last year 

*102 

Average console sale for indus- 
try last year 




'_ 



A LREADY the signs are pointing the way ahead, 
-**- up to still greater heights for all those who 
do business with RCA Victor! Already ship- 
ments of consoles to the trade show that last 
year's average console sale of $102 is being far 
outstripped. That means a still larger unit sale 
for the RCA Victor dealer, and much more 
money for him. 

Here again you see convincing proof of the 
commanding position that RCA Victor occupies 
in the fine set field. 

It won and is keeping that position by sheer 
merit of the product and of the sales, advertis- 
ing, and promotional plans put behind this 
supremely superior merchandise. 

Nowhere else in the world can you get a line 
that to the tremendous prestige of the great 
pioneer in radio, RCA, adds such colossal fea- 
tures as the "Magic Brain", the "Magic Eye", and 
RCA Metal Tubes. To make your sales efforts 
most quickly effective, to make the most money 
from radio, feature RCA Victor merchandise! 

RCA MFG. CO., INC., CAMDEN, N. J A SUBSIDIARY OF THE 

RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 




RADIO FACSIMILE PUSHES AHEAD 



Negotiations under way with leading - newspaper publishers 

Short-wave 24-hour service urged, rather than early-morning hours 
on broadcast channels 

Paper trade asked for quotations on paper rolls in carload lots 

Pannill announces facsimile news tabloids for ships at sea 

N. Y. Times and Hearst groups telephone pictures during ordinary 
long-distance calls 

Photographs from Ethiopia go wire-facsimile Rome to London, 
thence by radio-facsimile to New York 



* HOW far plans have already 
progressed to put radio facsimile ac- 
tually into the hands of the Amer- 
ican public, was revealed accidentally 
by one of the paper salesmen calling' 
to supply magazine print-paper for 
Radio Today. 

He "spilled the beans'' by inquiring 
innocently : 

"What can the radio people be 
wanting with rolls of paper 8 inches 
wide in carload lots? We have had 
inquiries about prices on quantity 
orders of these rolls containing thou- 
sands of sheets." 

Of course, radio facsimile is the an- 
swer. 

These rolls of paper would be sup- 
plied to broadcast listeners to put 
into their facsimile attachments, so 
that ordinary home receiving sets can 



be employed to print a tabloid news- 
paper during the early morning hours, 
when the radio set is ordinarily shut 
off. The facsimile attachment itself 
would cost somewhere between $100 
and $25 — the latter price if produced 
in mass quantities. 



Home printing pi-ess 

As outlined in these columns last 
month, such a facsimile newspaper 
would be printed in the home com- 
plete with headlines, cartoons, dis- 
play ads, fashion sketches, and every 
other feature of modern typograph- 
ical production. It would be a com- 
plete newspaper, printed "at destina- 
tion" on the home "radio printing- 
press," and delivering reports of news 




Radio facsimile reproducer of carbon-paper type to be used for printing neics- 
papers on ships and, eventually, in homes. 



events within a few minutes of their 
actual occurrence. 

Already it is known that conversa- 
tions have been going on witii some 
of the leading newspaper publishers 
of New York City, outlining plans 
under which facsimile might be intro- 
duced in cooperation with the news- 
paper people, rather than engendering 
their competition and opposition. 
Some of the papers reported taking 
an active interest in this new devel- 
opment are the New York Times, the 
Herald Tribune, the World-Telegram, 
and the American. Working models 
of home facsimile receivers have been 
exhibited to the publishers, and 
methods have been discussed by which 
the paper rolls for the tabloids, 
backed by advertising, might be fur- 
nished to households equipped with 
facsimile home printers. 

The newspaper fraternity recently 
had a convincing demonstration of 
the possibilities of facsimile reproduc- 
tion, when it woke up with a start to 
find what the Times and the Hearst 
interests have been doing in telephon- 
ing news pictures over ordinary tele- 
phone lines and instruments. 

Of course, the Associated Press's 
telephoto service has been in opera- 
tion for a year or more, transmitting 
photographs over specially -prepared 
lines at an operating cost of half-a- 
million dollars a year. This expense, 
divided among the cooperating papers, 
means a cost of many thousands of 
dollars per year to each paper for this 
service. 

Picture-whistle 

But the Times and the Mirror — not 
in the AP hook-up — have been experi- 
menting with their own portable ap- 
paratus for sending photos over ordi- 
nary telephone circuits. Here is the 
way it works : 

A staff news photographer takes a 
picture in say Albany, Chicago, or 
San Francisco. In a few minutes it 
is developed, and then with his port- 
able facsimile transmitter, he goes 
to the nearest telephone booth. Re- 
volving the picture under the scrutin- 
izing "electric eye" of the facsimile 
machine, the picture elements are re- 
solved into equivalent whistling 
sounds. So in the booth, calling up 
his home office in New York and 
speaking from an ordinary telephone 
instrument, the photographer asks to 
be connected with the photograph-re- 
ceiving room. 



22 



Radio Today 



When the New York end is ready, 
the photographer starts "playing" the 
picture into his telephone mouthpiece. 
The whistling sounds go over the line 
to New York and at the home office 
are recorded on a synchronously ro- 
tating sheet of photographic paper, 
which thus reproduces the picture. In 
this way, within ten to twenty min- 
utes, the picture is in the publication 
office ready to have cuts made for 
printing. 

Advantage of the individual-picture 
transmission is that the publisher 
pays only for the time consumed in 
making a regular telephone call while 
sending the picture, instead of being 
required to lease lines 24 hours a day 
whether pictures are wanted or not. 
For a time the telephone company 
vigorously opposed the use of its lines 
for such sporadic picture transmis- 
sions, but within the last month has 
reversed its policy and now permits 
experimentally such picture transmis- 
sions at regular rates, providing no 
physical attachments are made to its 
standard lines and instruments. 

The Cooley system, once tried out 
by WOR, is being experimented with 
by the N. Y. Times. Walter Howey. 
veteran journalist, is the inventor of 
the apparatus used by the Hearst 
papers. 

War pictures by radio 

The newspapers have also had an- 
other striking demonstration of the 
magic of facsimile in the war pictures 
coming across the Atlantic by radio, 
The recent war scares in Europe have 
resulted in the sending of an in- 
creased number of pictures from Lon- 
don covering current news events. 
With the beginning of actual hostil- 
ities in Ethiopia, photographs of 
troops in the field there are being 
flown by air-plane to Rome, where 
they are put onto the wire-facsimile 
line and telephoned to London. There 
they are put on the trans-Atlantic 
facsimile system and sent to New 
York by radio. 

Further immediate activity in radio 
facsimile is presaged by the an- 
nouncement just made by Charles J. 
Pannill. president of the Radiomarine 
Corporation, that within a month 
four trans-Atlantic passenger ships 
will be equipped with facsimile ap- 
paratus for receiving news and 
weather-maps. The President Hard- 
ing has been operating as a test-ship 
for facsimile experiments during the 
past three months and has demon- 
strated the efficacy of the new ship- 
facsimile apparatus, and its freedom 
from interference caused by rolling 
of the vessel. 



Mr. Pannill predicts that in the 
near future every first-class passen- 
ger liner will be equipped to produce 
complete newspapers for its passen- 
gers, as well as frequent weather- 
maps for the guidance of the navi- 
gating officer. A newspaper page or 
weather-map can be sent in about 
twenty minutes, Mr. Pannill ex- 
plained. 

Dazzled consternation 

With evidences of facsimile poten- 
tialities bearing down upon them 
from all sides, it is not surprising 
that the newspaper publishers are in 
a state of dazzled consternation as to 
what may happen next. Part of the 
publishers are evidently out to combat 
the new typographical medium which 
they see bearing down upon them ; 



the other half want to embrace and 
utilize it, and aid in its introduction. 

The recent conversations between 
radio men and newspaper publishers 
have in mind the latter cooperation 
plan, making the facsimile service an 
auxiliary of news dissemination, with 
existing newspaper offices acting as 
"points of issue" for the new develop- 
ment of home tabloids printed on 
"home radio printing presses." Which 
plan will ultimately be adopted will 
depend on many factors in the compli- 
cated fabrics of radio and publishing. 

But whatever the method employed 
for the introduction of facsimile, it is 
certain to exert the most profound 
and far-reaching effect on all publish- 
ing and advertising — probably no less 
revolutionary than the introduction 
of movable type and the printing press 
itself. 



TELEVISION TODAY 



* AMERICAN laboratories now 
lead in television research. Some of 
the European countries, however, are 
already making public use of tele- 
vision service. 

Germany is offering probably the 
most to the public with its 180-line 
25-frame per second transmissions 
from a 7-meter transmitter in Berlin: 
Several places are provided in the city 
where the people may view these pro- 
grams, and they are proving most 
popular. Practically all the program 
material is provided by films. While 
the German engineers expect to carry 
on experiments with 1.80-line pic- 
tures, they plan eventually to go to 
270-line pictures. This latter figure 



has been arrived at by taking into 
consideration transmission cost and 
land line relays using coaxial cables. 
Plans are being made to lay a cable 
with band pass of 3 megacycles from 
Berlin to Frankfort. It is estimated 
that 270-line receivers will cost from 
$240 to $500. 

Experimental 60 - line 25 - frame 
transmissions on 175 meters have 
been started in France, but no regu- 
lar schedule is maintained. The 
French hope to be able to go to 90 
lines and then to 180 as quickly as 
practicable, but it is doubtful if much 
progress in this direction will be 
made before 1936. 




Television and sound transmitting truck used by German Reichs RundfunkgeseV- 
schaft for covering current events. 



October, 1935 



23 



EXTENDING FREQUENCY RANGE— JOHN F. RIDER 



Service editor tells how to alter frequency range of sets to receive 
high fidelity and police broadcasts 



• A NUMBEE of owners 
of receivers produced years ago have 
suddenly become conscious of the fact 
that the police are broadcasting sig- 
nals around 1,600 kc. Consequently, 
they have voiced the desire to listen 
to such stations — despite the fact 
that the receivers they own do not 
cover the band. Furthermore, experi- 
mental transmission seems to be go- 
ing on around 1,550 to 1,600 kc. and 
of high fidelity nature. ... At least 
such is the report, although we have 
never heard any of these programs. 
Be that as it may, the subject of in- 
creasing the frequency spectrum of 
these broadcast receivers at the r-f. 
and the audio end has been suggested 
in correspondence. 

Without any idea of discouraging 
servicemen who have entertained 
ideas concerning such changes and 
the possible income resulting there- 
from, we feel that it is best to state 
the facts as they are. So here goes. 

New coils 

There are several ways of extend- 
ing the tuning band. The best is the 
use of new coils and new tuning con- 
densers — perhaps only new coils, if 
these coils are secured from the manu- 
facturer of the receiver and were spe- 
cifically designed for that purpose. 
If this is done, the cost is not justified 
considering the final result. ... If 
this is not in conformity with your 
ideas and you feel that you can make 
money by adding certain units — not 
necessarily changing the coils — all 
well and good. 

You can increase the frequency 
limit at the higher frequency end, 
by tampering with the coils (reducing 
the inductance), but this will decrease 
the limit at the lower frequency end 
and will interfere with the dial cali- 
brations. Another possible method is 
to reduce the minimum capacity in 
shunt with the tuning condensers in 
the various circuits that are tuned. 
This means reducing the capacity of 
shunt trimmers to minimum. That 
this system will work is not guaran- 
teed, because even with this minimum 
reduced to the lowest figure, there 
may be more than the permissible ca- 
pacity in shunt with the coils. . . . 
Such changes have been effected upon 
a few receivers, but are possible only 
with those which tune to the highest 



wavelength within the broadcast band 
with appreciable capacity still left in 
the tuning condenser. As a rule re- 
alignment is necessary. 

Another possible method, although 
subject to some difficulties is shown 
in Figs. 1 and 2. Fig. 1 is the basic 
circuit of a single-tuned stage, usu- 
ally without AVO control. The re- 
finement is the insertion of a series 
trimmer, switch controlled, as in Fig. 
2. It is essential that the minimum 
capacity of this trimmer be very 
small, so that when set to its mid- 
point setting, the total capacity in 
the circuit will be less than the 
minimum capacity of the system as 
originally used. The cable connec- 
tion to the high side of the circuit 
must be shielded. The switch is open 
when the trimmer is in the circuit 
and reception is desired on the high- 
frequency end of the band. Closing 
the switch, shorts the trimmer and 
normal operation is effected. 



A similar change in a circuit using 
AVC is shown in Figs. 3 and 4. The 
basic circuit with AVC is shown in 
Fig. 3. The revision is shown in 
Fig. 4. 

Eeceivers with several tuned cir- 
cuits of the type illustrated in Figs. 
1 and 3, require such a switch con- 
trolled series trimmer in each circuit 
and isolation of the "high" leads in 
each stage. This is not the simplest 
of wiring arrangements. 

Broaden response 

In the event that the coils used in 
these tuned circuits have a very high 
"Q", it may be necessary to broaden 
the response by the insertion of a 
fixed resistor, as shown in Fig. 5. 
This resistor is also controlled by 
the switch, which determines the 
presence of the trimmer, C, in the 
circuit. The value of this resistor 
may vary from a few ohms to per- 




24 



Radio Today 



liaps 10, 15 or even 20 ohms, and 
must be determined by practice. This 
is of particular importance if the 
high-fidelity transmission is to be re- 
ceived and the circuits are sharply 
resonant. When the switch S is 
closed, the fixed resistor, as well as 
the series trimmer, are removed from 
the circuit and normal operation 
obtains. 




J=T 



X± L 



-L 




The revision of a superheterodyne 
receiver is carried out in the manner 
described. The basic circuit is shown 
in Fig. 6; and the revised circuit, 
that is, the presence of the series trim- 
mer in the various parts of the system, 
is shown in Fig. 7 (page 26). In each 
instance, the trimmer inserted is des- 
ignated as C. Alignment is carried 
out, by first correctly aligning the re- 
ceiver, with the trimmers shorted. 
Then the switches are opened and 
the receiver is realigned at say 1,550 
kc., by varying only the added trim- 
mers. This alignment should be made 
with the added trimmers at about 
half the maximum capacity. It is, 
of course, understood that the posi- 
tion of the dial setting for the 1,550 
to 1,600 kc. band with the switches 
open, will be the normal tuning limit 
of the receiver, when adjusted for 
normal reception. Furthermore, when 
aligning the added series trimmers, 
the regular trimmers in the receiver 
are not varied. The leads to the con- 
trol switches should be as short as 
possible. Once more it may be nec- 
essary to insert the series resistors 
to broaden the band. Such a resistor 
would be used in the various stages, 
other than the oscillator stage. No 
change is required in the i-f. stage, 
unless increase in band response is 
required in the i-f. system as well. 
(To page 26) 



THEY'RE THE TOP- 

WHEN IT COMES TO QUALITY' 




1 A 
i 



This man has a double-barrelled 
reason for pushing Sylvania Tubes 

• "They don't make any better tubes than Sylvanias . . . that's one 
reason I recommend them to my customers. I never get "kick-backs." 
Sylvanias satisfy my customers every time. 

"Another reason I push Sylvanias is because I can make an extra profit 
selling them. And in the radio business, that extra profit helps a lot! 
"Sylvania is a good sound company that seems to know what the dealer's 
problems are all about. They can see the dealer's side of the case, and 
they play good clean ball. You bet I'm satisfied with Sylvania Tubes!" 
Write today for information about Sylvania's Profit Policy Plan. Find out 
about that extra profit . . . and the sales and technical helps that go to 
Sylvania dealers and distributors. The Hygrade Sylvania Corporation, 
Emporium, Pa. 

SYLVANIA 

THE SET-TESTED RADIO TUBE 

© 1935 Hygrade Sylvania Corp. 




This ad 


pinned 


to 


y o 


n r 


letterhe 


ad 


wil 


b 


ring > 


Oil 


com 


plel 


e data 


on * 


the 


great Baldv 


in 


line 


of 


Rep la 


■e- 


mei 


t S 


leakers. 





CONSOUDATED RADIO PRODUCTS CO., 361 W. SUPERIOR SI., CHICAGO 

200 BSMBWAy, RE» YORK, N. t 



October, 1935 



25 



TUBE TESTER 



RELIABILITY 
AT LOW COST 




A new emission type Tube Tester that 
tests all metal and glass-metal tubes. 
Features: 

Double Grid Cap for Metal and glass- 
metal tubes. Shadow-type A.C. meter 
for adjusting line voltage. Leakage 
and short test. Tubes tested under 
load. But four simple operations re- 
quired. Handsome portable quartered 
oak case with all-metal panel having 
silvered letters on black background. 
Especially constructed against obso- 
lescence. 

Model 430 complete with Triplett in- 
strument having direct reading GOOD- 
BAD scale, protected against C <| Q AA 



damag 



\et Denier Price. 



$14.40 



Model 431 — same as Model 430, except 
has Readrite direct reading GOOD- 
BAD meter. Dealer's 
Net Price 

Readrite also manufacture all types of 
testers used for servicing radio sets, 
including: Set Testers, Tube Testers, 
Resistance, Continuity and Capacity 
Testers, Point-to-Point Testers and in- 
expensive Indicating Meters. 

SEE YOUR JOBBER 




MAIL COUPON NOW 

1 READRITE METER WORKS, 

Dent. RT 11, [Hull ton. Ohio. I 

Please send me more information — | 

Model 430 Model 431 | 

Catalogue 



Name 

Address 

City State 



SERVICING — RIDER 



Of course, such change is necessary 
in order to realize upon the high 
fidelity transmission, providing that 
proper sideband transfer is secured in 
the system ahead of the i-f. amplifier. 

Stagger i-f. stages 

Speaking about the i-f. amplifier, 
the simplest method of adapting the 
system to increased sideband trans- 
fer, is by staggering the stages. A 
compromise adjustment can be 
reached which will provide sufficient 
band pass so as to enable realization 
of the increased sidebands in high 
fidelity transmission, yet not inter- 
fere with adjacent channel selectivity 
over the normal band. This is not 
guaranteed, but can be accomplished 
under favorable conditions. The in- 
sertion of additional switches to con- 
trol series resistors in the secondary 
circuits to increase band width at a 
sacrifice in amplification greater than 
that caused by staggering, compli- 
cates matters too much. 



Excessive staggering should not be 
used, as it is a fixed adjustment and 
cannot be changed at will or with 
great ease, to suit changing condi- 
tions. At best, staggering reduces 
the gain in the i-f. amplifier. Hence 
the degree of staggering used, must 
be a compromise hetween maximum 
gain consistent with the required 
band width. At no time should the 
staggering be increased beyond the 
capabilities of the audio system. As 
a rule, this means about 5,000 to 7,000 
cycles, each side of the peak frequency. 

To get true fidelity reception the 
audio system will have to be modi- 
fied or replaced. Replacement of the 
audio channel with one of greater re- 
sponse requires that the speaker, too, 
be changed. Such changes cost 
money. . . . Too much money! As a 
matter of fact — now that the method 
of revision has been described — we 
do not think that many such jobs 
will pay. . . . Not unless the owner 
of his receiver is in love with the 
woodwork on his present cabinet. 



SERVICE NOTES 



Visual alignment 

*■ As each day passes 
there is more justification for refer- 
ence to visual alignment with the 
carthode-ray oscillograph. . . . More 
and more of these oscillograph units 
are being sold, as is evidenced by 
communications received requesting 
certain kinds of special data. 

One of the important items to re- 
member when the cathode-ray oscillo- 



graph is used to align the i-f. system, 
stage by stage, is the possibility of an 
assymetrical response curve, due to 
regeneration introduced when the sig- 
nal generator is connected to some 
part of the i-f. system, other than the 
input circuit of the mixer tube. The 
leads between the generator and the 
i-f. transformers may feed some of 
the energy from the input to the out- 
put circuits and thus vary the amount 
of regeneration in the circuit. . . . 




26 



Radio Today 



This will interfere with the develop- 
ment of the true response curve. Iso- 
lating resistors should be used in the 
"high'' leads to act as de-coupling re- 
sistors. ... It would be a good thing 
to shield the "high" lead right up to 
its connection with the grid lead. 
The isolating resistor is connected 
into the circuit between the grid of 
the tube, through which the signal is 
being fed into the stage and the 
"high" lead of the preceding i-f. 
transformer (in series with grid lead). 
The "high" lead from the oscillator 
is connected to the control grid of 
the tube being used as the coupling 
tube. About 50,000 ohms will do. 

On 60 megacycles 

* Several of the commer- 
cial all-wave receivers extend the re- 
ceiving range as low as 60 megacycles, 
or 5 meters. Servicing receivers of 
this type, particularly alignment at 
this frequency or even between 30 
and 60 megacycles, is not the sim- 
plest in the world. Not that it can- 
not be done with existing equipment, 
but special care is required. 

When alignment problems are en- 
countered, we are accustomed to 
working with transformers, that is 
coils and condensers. Not so on this 
band in several receivers. As a gen- 
eral rule, the inductance in such 
tuned circuit is a length of wire, not 
coiled as the conventional r-f. trans- 
former winding. The position of this 
wire, with respect to the other ele- 
ments in the system, is very impor- 
tant. When working on any such 
receivers, do not move any wires from 
their normal position. 



Not only are the wires important, 
but the related bypass condensers are 
likewise important. The bypass con- 
densers influence the tuning and this 
means not only the value of these 
condensers, but also the leads between 
the condensers and the points where 
they are connected. In one particu- 
lar receiver, the ECA C-15-3, the cir- 
cuit components are so important on 
this band, that while one side of the 
heater circuit is grounded directly to 
the chassis, the other side of the 
heater circuit is grounded through a 
.0004-mfd. fixed condenser. It seems 
pretty certain that if replacement of 
units used in this band is required, 
the genuine replacement parts will be 
needed. 

Furthermore, when checking by- 
pass condensers used in this band, 
shunting of the suspected condenser 
with another from a capacity box, 
will not be satisfactory. It will be 
necessary to remove the suspected 
condenser and replace it with another 
of identical and correct capacity and 
identical length of leads. 

Incidentally, when working with 
receivers which extend the tuning- 
range to encompass the five-meter 
band, you will find that this high 
band is not fed through the r-f. am- 
plifiers normally used for the other 
band. In general, the band, signal 
on the 5-meter range is fed from the 
antenna into the mixer tube. 

A double superheterodyne 

* Have you come across 
the Stewart-Warner 105 receiver? 
Maybe not — but if you do, bear one 
thing in mind. There are some differ- 






V: 





Here is the test bench designed by the Shannon Radio Service shop in Mt. Vernon, 
N. Y. Service men working at this bench use the line method of repair; as the 
job moves along it passes systematically through the fixed stages of tests, repairs, 
inspection, approval. 



Research first . . . 
sales afterwards 

CLAROSTAT 



CLAROSTAT has been ac- 
cused on occasion of being too 
conservative. CLAROSTAT has 
often lagged in offering so-called 
new developments to resistance 
buyers. Many large assemblers 
under sales pressure, have 
adopted devices which had pro- 
gressed little beyond the "sam- 
ple" stage, much to their dis- 
may when production quantities 
were "rushed through." 

CLAROSTAT has never used 
such sales pressure. It considers 
trial production runs as a neces- 
sary part of research. It is not 
dominated by a sales department 
bloodthirsty for orders at the ex- 
pense of proper tooling up. 

While this policy may appear 
less glamorous ... it is sounder 
. . . both for buyers and for 
CLAROSTAT. And . . . it 
has kept CLAROSTAT prod- 
ucts in receivers SINCE RADIO 
FIRST BEGAN. 

Some of the precision products 
which Clarostat pioneered 
follow: 

Wire Wound Potentiometers 

Wire Wound Rheostats 

Composition Element Potentiometers 

Constant Impedance Controls 

Mixer Controls 

Faders 

Tone Controls 

Volume Controls 

Automatic Voltage Regulators 

Ballast Resistors 

Line Reducing Resistors 

Compression Rheostats 

Fixed Resistors 

Fixed Center Tapped Resistors 

Variable Center Tapped Resistors 

Flexible Resistors 

Metal Covered Heavy Duty Resistors 

Metal Covered Voltage Dividers 

L Pads and T Pads 

CLAROSTAT 

MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 
285 N.6th St. 
Brooklyn 

n. y. 





October, 1935 



27 



1936 



MASTER 
TEST SET 




MODEL, 

1206 



DEALER SOne? 
NET PRICE 0^< 



• This new Triplett Master Test Set 
is an outstanding servicing instru- 
ment. The Serviceman has in this 
portable set a complete laboratory — 
all he needs for servicing either in 
the home or his shop. 

The Triplett Master Test Set is rap- 
idly gaining popularity with service- 
men because it answers their every 
requirement, is designed particularly 
to avoid obsolescence and has a par- 
ticular appeal to the serviceman just 
beginning to purchase his better in- 
struments. 

The Triplett Master Test Set is com- 
posed of these units which can be 
purchased separately at the prices 
indicated: 

Model 1200 Volt-Oluii-MiUisiiiuiieter 

Net to Dealer $21. U7 

Model 1210-A Tube Tester 

Net to Dealer 20.00 

Model 1220-A Free-Point Tester 

Net to Dealer S.33 

Model 1231 All-Wave Signal Generator 
Net to Dealer 2<>.<S7 

Model 1204 Leatherette Carrying Case 
(with Demountable Cover) 

Net to Dealer (i.00 

Write lor Catalog. See them at your Jobber. 







tapur 




ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENTS 

MAIL COUPON FOR DETAILS 

I 1 

1 Triplett Electrical Instrument Co., 
I Dept. RT-K, Bluffton, Ohio, I'.S.A. 

' Please send me information on the 

' following: 

I 

I 



NAME 



1 Street 

. City State 



SERVICE NOTES-RIDER 



ences between this receiver and the 
usual multi-band superheterodyne. 
. . . The receiver employs two mixers 
and two oscillators. ... If you did 
not look for it, you would never know 
it, because operation is as simple as 
with the conventional system, despite 
the greater complexity of the circuit. 
The differences are found in the 
system ahead of the i-f. amplifier. 
One mixer and one oscillator are used 
solely for reception on short waves. 
The other mixer and oscillator are 
used for regular broadcast reception, 
but also come into play when short- 
wave signals are being received. . . . 
Do you follow? 

-#- 



Zenith stratosphere 

* This 25-tube receiver 
is a custom-built job and was not 
produced in usual production man- 
ner, so that the likelihood of numer- 
ous service calls is not very great. 
. . . Although not certain of exact 
figures, we believe that the produc- 
tion of this particular model was 
definitely limited. However, it is still 
significant to note that the grid cir- 
cuit of only the first r-f. stage is 
tuned. The remainder of the tuned 
circuits in the r-f. system are in the 
plate circuits of the first and second 
r-f. tubes. 



?"o/?f 



<iH7 
DET-OSC. 



GDC 




Zenith Stratosphere 



When tuning to short waves, the 
signal is fed into the short-wave 
mixer and the required heterodyning 
signal is fed into the broadcast mixer. 
The resultant signal is of a frequency 
of 1,525 kc. The broadcast mixer 
has a fixed tuned circuit responsive 
to 1,525 kc. The broadcast oscillator 
generates the heterodyning signal, 
which when beating against the 1,525 
kc. signal fed into the broadcast 
mixer, provides the required 177.5 kc. 
intermediate signal. 

When the receiver is used for broad- 
cast reception, the short-wave detec- 
tor and short-wave oscillator and the 
special 1,525 kc. tuned circuit are re- 
moved from the system (by means of 
a switch) and the remainder of the 
receiver operates in normal manner. 
When the receiver is adjusted to the 
short-wave band, the wave-range 
switch automatically inserts the 1,525 
kc. tuned circuit into the broadcast 
band mixer input circuit. 



The highest frequency band in this 
receiver is covered with a separate 
coil, which is not a part of the tapped 
detector coil in the receiver. The first 
r-f. stage is not used when covering 
the 4.7 to 15.3-meter band in the 
highest range. The input signal is 
fed from the antenna to the plate 
circuit of the 2nd r-f. tube. How- 
ever, a portion of this band, as cov- 
ered by the next range, namely, from 
9.4 to 15.3 meters, is amplified by 
both r-f. amplifiers. 

The circuit of the r-f. and mixer 
portion of the receiver is shown here- 
with. Note the use of impedance 
coupling, as previously mentioned. 
Variable-coupled i-f. transformers 
are used, thereby providing for vari- 
able band width in the i-f. amplifier, 
as the occasion requires. 

One more tube 

* There is a tendency, 
as evidenced by the new receivers, to 
separate the mixer and the oscillator 



28 



Radio Today 



tubes. . . . This is so even if a 6A7 
is used as the mixer. In the majority 
of last year's superheterodyne re- 
ceivers, the 6A7 was used as a com- 
bination mixer and oscillator. In 
the modern receivers, the heterodyn- 
ing signal from the oscillator tube is 
fed into the mixer tube via the screen 
grid of the mixer. The coupling be- 
tween the oscillator and the mixer 
tube is a small fixed capacity. The 
grid, normally interpreted as the 
screen grid in the 6L7, is grid num- 
ber 3. 

Signal beacon 

* The zero beat between 
the two frequencies. . . . That is the 
way the receiver is tuned. . . . Have 
you come across these Grunow re- 
ceivers? . . . The signal beacon is a 
beat oscillator, fixed tuned, and res- 
onated to zero beat with the inter- 
mediate frequency. If this oscillator 
is off calibration it will interfere 
with correct tuning, because it will 
zero beat with one of the frequencies, 
present in the sidebands of the carrier 
signal. Zero beat will then occur at 
some frequency other than the accu- 
rate carrier frequency. To align prop- 
erly the signal beacon, tune the i-f. 
assembly accurately to the correct i-f. 
frequency. Then tune the signal 
beacon oscillator to zero beat with 
the test signal being fed through the 
i-f. oscillator. Make certain that you 
are at zero beat by slightly shifting 
the tuning of the signal beacon, above 
and below the zero beat point. Then 
reset to the zero beat point and check 
by slightly changing the frequency 
of the test signal generator. Any 
deviation of the test signal oscillator 



frequency from the correct i-f. signal 
should produce an audio beat signal 
in the speaker. For this final check- 
ing, you should not use modulation of 
the test signal. 

I-F. regeneration 

* The new Atwater Kent 
models 856 and 976 receivers employ 
a third winding in the i-f. trans- 
former connected between the i-f. am- 
plifier tube and the demodulator. 
This winding is connected between 
the plate and the screen grid of the 
i-f. tube and is coupled to the other 
windings in the associated trans- 
former. A portion of the signal in 
the plate circuit is therefore fed back 
into the screen grid and a certain 
amount of regeneration, with conse- 
quent gain in amplification, is intro- 
duced. Schematic diagram is shown 
below. 

White transmission cable 

* Our living room has 
antique finished walls. This is not 
an unusual color, hence what we will 
say is not an extraordinary situation. 
In fact, we feel that the majority of 
living rooms, for that matter other 
rooms, have light colored walls. . . . 
An antenna installation was made 
and the lead-in was carried around 
the room. Transmission cable was 
used for the lead-in and it was nec- 
essary to cross the window moulding 
and some of the wall space to finally 
reach the floor. . . . 

The serviceman who made the in- 
stallation unreeled the transmission 
lead-in. It was black. . . . Why black, 
when the walls are ivory or antique? 
. . . Was there no white covered 



FREE -> 





RADOLEK 
DEALERS 

make the most 

PROFITS. Here is 

the Reason Why! 

• The New Radolek 1935 Fall Edition 
of the Profit Guide is the most complete 
Radio Parts Catalog ever published — 
new, bigger and better. Everything in 
radio — at the right prices. Over 160 
pages of valuable, money-saving "radio- 
buying" information. Over 10,000 sep- 
arate Repair Parts — hundreds of new 
items — a complete, new selection of Ra- 
dio Receivers and Amplifiers. Contains 
the most complete, exact duplicate, re- 
placement parts listings, of volume con- 
trols condensers, transformers, vibrators 
ever compiled. Nowhere, ever, has there 
been a Radio Parts Catalog comparable 
to this superb book. Every page brings 
you extra profits. This is your book — it's 
FREE. If you want the best Radio 
Parts Catalog — if you want to give 
better service at bigger profits — then 
send for this NEW Radolek Profit Guide . 



RADOLEK restricts distribution 
of this catalog to active and legiti- 
mate Radio Men. Please enclose your 
business card or letterhead — 



THE RADOLEK CO. 

645 West Randolph Street, Chicago, III. 

Send me FREE the Big New RADOLEK 
PROFIT GUIDE 

Name 

Address 

Are you a Serviceman? □ Dealer? D Expm? □ 



Atwater Kent Models 856 and 976 



^^ Servicemen! 

CTI Le * Mc Hc, p 

You Build a 

REAL 
I SUCCESS 

Naturally, I don't claim that EVERY 
serviceman who has taken Spray- 
berry training is making" "big" 
money." But taken by and large, 
you'll find Sprayberry graduates 
forging ahead far more rapidly than 
competitors who drift along, relying 
solely on their own resources and 
ideas. 

In almost every case, a modest in- 
vestment in Sprayberry training 
has netted handsome dividends. 
Dozens of enthusiastic letters prove 
this. 

GET ALL THE FACTS ! 

Let me tell you about this modern 
course designed exclusively for for- 
ward-looking servicemen. This in- 
formation will cost you nothing 
and* sis it has alresiily done for so 
many others, may point the way to 
a better, brighter future in the 
work to which yon are devoting 
your life. Send the coupon \OW! 

C I CDDAVRFDDV 2548 University PI., N.W. 
T. L, SrKAIDLKKI Washington, D.C. 

Without cost or obligation, please send your 
book '-PUTTING PROFITS AND EF- 
FICIENCY INTO SERVICING." 

Name 

Street 

Address RT10/3S 



SPRAYBERRY'S PRACTICAL 
MECHANICS raV.o SERVICE 



October, 1935 



29 




SERVICE NOTES-RIDER 



ENGINEERING 




cable ? . . . Sure, but he bad none. . . . 
The result is a continual clamor 
from the lady, who takes pride in her 
living room, to have the cable 
changed. ... So we became interested 
in finding out what, other servicemen 
do. . . . The majority have black 
cable. . . . Very few have paid any 
attention to the actual necessity of 
white transmission cable. . . . The 
manufacturers are supposed to be 
making such cable, but where is it? 
Most servicemen carry and sell black 
cable. . . . How come? 

Why business fails 

* The following data 
originally tabulated by Dun and 
Bradstreet, the credit agency, con- 
vey some very pertinent data. Al- 
though the facts shown here relate to 
business in general, there are certain 
items which can be very closely asso- 
ciated with the radio service business 
and which are of great importance to 
the men who are running service or- 
ganizations. It is to be remembered 
that the servicing industry is just as 
much a part of commerce in the 
United States, as any other form or 
type of maintenance organization. 

The enumerated reasons why busi- 
nesses fail and the relative impor- 
tance of the controlling factors are 
given herewith. 

Per Cent 

Incompetence 38.20 

Lack of capital 30.30 

Fraud 7.00 

Inexperience 5.60 

Neglect 1.70 

Failure of others 1.70 

Unwise credits 1.30 

Extravagance 1.10 

Competition 1.10 

Speculation 70 

Specific conditions . . . 11.30 



100.00 



It is interesting to analyze the 
relative importance of some of these 
items. For example : incompetence. 
The ability to apply oneself properly 
to a business is being competent. 
The lack of this ability is the prime 
reason for failure in business. Lack 
of capital is not as important as in- 
competence, because if one is compe- 
tent and realizes the limitations of 
the capital on hand, he can keep 
the operations of the business within 
the ability of the capital. Further- 



more, the man, who can run a busi- 
ness properly, can make that capital 
most productive. ... In fact, he can 
do more with less funds than the man 
who is not as competent, but has 
more funds. It is important to re- 
member that the word incompetent, 
as used here, does not denote actual 
knowledge pertaining to the technical 
branch of the business activity — 
that is the technical features of the 
item or items being sold. . . . This is 
expressed as experience or inexperi- 
ence in the listing. 



I.R.S.M. meets Oct. 25-27 

* The annual Xew York 
Convention and radio parts show of 
the Institute of Radio Service Men 
will be held October 25-27 at the 
Hotel Pennsylvania in ISTew York 
City. A representative display of ex- 
hibits and a large attendance is prom- 
ised. During the service men's con- 
vention, on October 26, there will be 
a meeting of the RMA Service Sec- 
tion of which F. B. Ostman of Cam- 
den, 1ST. J., is chairman. 



ii — \r~ii 



COMING f\ 

THE LARGEST VOLUME • 
PRODUCED SO FAR — 
VOLUME VI. 

• 1250 pases. 

• 90 page Index covering 6 vol- 
umes. 

• Double page spreads on com- 
plicated diagrams. 

• Products of over 115 manufac- 
turers. 

• Circuit diagrams on 1935-36 
receivers using the new metal 
and metal-glass tubes. 

As a progressive serviceman 
with his weather eye to prof- 
its you can't he whhont 
RIDER'S VOLUME VI. 1250 
pages of indispensable service 
data — The greatest manual 
ever! $7.50 

Sold with money back guarantee L_ 



X 






m 






JOHN JT. RIDER 
PUBLISHER 



1440 BROADWAY • NEW YORK 



30 



Radio Today 



WITH THE WHOLESALERS 



+ Against a backdrop of general 
optimism, jobber activities are 
branching in several special fields 
where Pall conditions make the op- 
portunities particularly attractive. 

Recent FHA rulings are being 
watched closely and are played for all 
they are worth. The Autumn series 
of manufacturer helps have a pick-up 
note which gets across only because 
of brighter prospects throughout the 
business world. Also, the time has 
come for methodic and substantial 
promotions in the farm districts. 
Merchandising of all-wave sets has 
some advertising possibilities which 
were not apparent a few months ago 
— the appeal of the Par-Off has a 
swell bang to it — all of which are in 
jobber plans for coming months. 

+ True and Blanchard Co., job- 
bers, Newport, Vt., announce these 
newly appointed dealers for their 
Fairbanks-Morse sets and RCA tubes: 
K. M. Parker, Hardwick, Vt.; G. E. 
Blake, Lancaster, N. H.; George M. 
Goudie, Lisbon, N. H.; E. G. Shat- 
tuck, Canaan, Vt. ; Theo. Lecours, 
Colebrook, N. H.; Hebert & Sons, 
Lyndonville, Vt. ; South End Service 
Station, St. Johnsbury, Vt.; L. W. 
Chamberlain, East Ryegate, Vt. ; Re- 
gan and Regan, Bakersfield, Vt.; B. 
C. Hawley, Jeffersonsville, Vt. 

* H. G. Erstrom has taken his 
good rep and his popularity to the 
Leo J. Meyberg Co., San Francisco, 
RCA distributors for California and 
Western Nevada, where he is now the 




Can't always believe what you see. 
Looks like Jim Quam, president of 
Quam-Nichols, and Jerry Kahn, presi- 
dent of Standard Transformer, caught 
a Muskie on their recent fishing trip; 
~but the truth is that Mrs. Kahn did 
the catching. 



new sales promotion manager. Er- 
strom began making friends in the 
radio business 8 years ago when he 
became executive secretary of the 
Federated Radio Trade Association. 
That organization became the Na- 
tional Federation of Radio Associa- 
tions a year later, and when the Ra- 
dio Wholesalers Association was 
started, Erstrom was secretary of 
both. Since that time, Erstrom has 
been busy organizing local radio as- 
sociations, directing legislation for 
distributors, making surveys in the 
industry, etc. Recently he was man- 
ager of the National Code Authority 
for the radio wholesalers. 

■*• The Carolinas Auto Supply Co., 

distributor, Charlotte, N. C, has ap- 
pointed W. L. Thomas, Winston Sa- 
lem, N. C, a dealer for Crosley 
radios. 

* Orlen Radio & Electric, Inc., 
Holyoke, Mass., has been named 
dealer for Crosley radios by Tarbell 
Waters, distributor, Springfield, 
Mass. 

* At the Rice Hotel in Houston, 
Texas, 2 00 dealers were guests of 
Reader's Wholesale Distributors, 

September 15. Hosts were Neil 
Bauer and Harry Roper; from 
Reader's came Hymen Reader, 
Charles A. Green, Harold Kalten- 
heuser, and Paul LaBow. 

* F. E. Stern, president of Stern 
& Co., jobber of Hartford, Conn., has 
added Ward Shurtleff to his staff. 

* Western Washington radio 
dealers went to Seattle, Wash., to 
get the low-down on the new Crosley 
line at Marshall-Wells, Coast distrib- 
utor. Roy Hallabaugh, Wells' elec- 
trical division manager, and M. C. 
Crosby, district representative, pre- 
sented the new sets. 

* Chas. McCauley, widely known 
music and radio dealer of Vermont, 
has been added to the sales staff of 
True and Blanchard, jobbers of New- 
port, Vt. 

* Pennsylvania radio dealers 
from 14 counties were guests of the 
Anthracite Radio Sales Co. of Scran- 
ton. The affair was held at Wilkes- 
Barre and Anthracite's president, 
William Sehlanger, was assisted by 
LeRoy Winters, sales manager in the 
showings. 

* Three hundred dealers in the 
Atlanta, Ga., district staged a huge 
Crosley pow-wow session with the 
Beck and Gregg Hardware Co., At- 
lanta, as host. Pres. W. A. Parker 
and Herndon Thomas, of Beck and 
Gregg, made appearances, as well as 
H. E. Richardson and Ralph Keating. 

* D. W. May, radio district sales 
manager for the General Electric 
Company, 570 Lexington Avenue, 
New York City, was married Sept. 5 
to Margaret Le Maire. Mr. May 
formerly operated radio stations in 
New Jersey, and afterward was 
Philco distributor for New Jersey 
and New York City. Mr. and Mrs. 



AMPLI F IE R 
CIRCUITS 



COMPLETE 

DESIGNS 

OF 

10 PUBLIC 

ADDRESS 

AMPLIFIERS 

FREE! 

A complete manual of circuits for Audio Amplifier, 
free on request! . . . Tried and tested design for 
every purpose. . . . Outputs from 3 to 30 watts. 
. . . Sent to you with complete parts list and 
their values. 

This valuable reference 
Book sent free to every- 
cne who tears out this ad 
and sends it in with 10c 
in stamps to cover mail- 
ing costs. No other ob- 
lig?licn. The supply '& 
limited. Get yours now! 





STANDARD TRANSFORMER CORP. , 

856 BLACKHAWK ST., CHICAGO, ILLINOIS i 

Please send me the Standard Manual of Sound I 

Amplifier Circuits. I am enclosing 10c in stamps, i 

Name | 

Address 1 

City State I 



Cfau/itAf Latest ^Development* 

WHOLESALE RADIO 5 

1{£W 1 9 36 CATALOG/ 



SERVICEMEN / 
DEALERS I 

For Highest Quality — for Fastest 

Service — the one best place to 

buy is from the world's largest 

organization of its kind. Over 

50,000 parts in stock! Five 

ches to serve you ! All 

nationally known lines! The 

WHOLESALE Catalog with 

t its 196 pages is the largest 

L ever published — and every- 

s listed at lowest 

vholcsale prices I 



In this "encyclopaedia of radio" 
you'll find every last minute develop- 
ment; newest sets from 2 to 24 tubes; 
a big Public Address section; a great 
department on Short Wave sets, kits 
and X'mitting equipment. There are 
parts, tools, tubes and accessories. If it's radio — 
we have it for immediate delivery. Get your FREE 
copy of this Bargain Book today. 




WHOLESALE RADIO SERVICE CO. 
100 Sixth Ave. Dept. RT-ll 
New York, N. Y. 



1 



new 196-page catalog No. 59 to 



NAME 

ADDBESS 



CITY STATE 

BRANCHES AT: 901 W. Jackson Blvd.. Chicago. 
430 W. Peachtree St., Atlanta. 219 Central Are., 
Newark, N. J. 542 E. Fordham Rd., Bronx, N. Y. ■ 



October, 1935 



31 



HELPS YOU SELL 
MOKE TIKES 




Glass Tubes without using adapters 

WEBBEK NEO!\ «L© 
Model 30 TUBE TESTER 

Here's a new instrument that will SELL more 
tubes— help you to "up" your tube sales. Attractive 
— has a real attention - getting illuminated control 
panel Very simple and easy to operate— your cus- 
tomers will go for it— they'll understand what you 
are duiti«-aiiil wm'll SELL MoHK TIT.ES This 
is the very latest development in TUBE TESTERS 
— operates on a recently developed new circuit closely 
relating to power output test. It has everything— 
does everything you'd expect of a fine instrument 
ami will pay lor itself from extra tube profits in a 
short time Webber Model 30 TUBE TESTER is real 
professional equipment at low cost. Sold by all jobbers. 
WRITE FOR FULL DETAILS 
This tester is only one of many units 
manufactured by this company which 
specializes In high quality, efficient, 
tested and approved radio products. 
Descriptive literature free — no obli- 
gation. Write for Bulletin R 1. 




EARL WEBBER 

1219 W .Washington Blvd., Chic 



CO. ( 

ago, 111. I 




"The Standard of the Industry" 

THE 

Supev Sensitive 
ARMORED 
DYNAMIC 

IS THE 

i936 SPEAKER 

Representatives 

Mr. C. A. Stone, 

c/o Carl A. Stone Co., Ltd., 

209 West Seventeenth Street, 

Los Angeles, California 

Mr. George D. Norris, 
303 East Pike Street, 
Seattle, Washington 

Mr. O. A. Huber, 

30 Ninth Street, 

San Francisco, California 

Mr. James C. Pope, Jr., 

3037 Knox Avenue, South, 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 

QUAM-NICHOLS CO. 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 
1674 Broadway, New York City 



May will make their home at 148 
Wellington Avenue, Wykagyl Park, 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 

* Raymond Rosen & Co., Phila- 
delphia, have a new and enlarged 
home, formally opened during the 
last week in September. The Rosen 
Co. handle RCA-Victor radio prod- 
ucts, Kelvinators, and Prima weshers. 

■k Fada has reported the appoint- 
ment of the Tristate Electrical Sup- 
ply Co., Hagerstown, Maryland, as 
exclusive distributor in Western Mary- 
land and Shenandoah Valley in Vir- 
ginia. R. A. Stott is secretary and 
sales manager of Tristate. 

+ After chalking up the most 
successful September in its history, 
The Roycraft Company, Philco radio 
distributors, 162 5 Hennepin Ave., 
Minneapolis, Minn., is laying exten- 
sive plans for making October an- 
other record-breaking month. Sales 
in September in this Northwest ter- 
ritory showed an increase of 112 per 
cent over September of 1934. 

+ The Radio and Electrical Show 
at the Grand Central Palace may 
have ended September 28, but for 
Colen-Gnihn Company, metropolitan 
distributors for Grunow, it was just 
an opening night. Taking a tip from 
the Great American Tourist, the 
company mounted its exhibit on a 
trailer, and proceeded to offer its 
display all over Long Island, West- 
chester, and other points in the local 
district. 

* New Crosley models got a 
country club airing when Connecti- 
cut dealers were guests of Thomas 
J. O'Brien, pres. of the Hartford 
Electric Supply Co., Hartford, early 
last month. Dwight A. Pease, Hart- 
ford Supply's vice-pres., and H. D. 
Schumacher, Crosley's New England 
sales manager, were co-hosts. 

+ Grunow products on the Pa- 
cific coast got a triple boost last 
month when the F. B. Connelly Co., 

Northwest distributors, held dealer 
meetings at Seattle, Portland and 
Spokane. More than 600 were there, 
and Kenneth A. Connelly, vice-pres. 
and general manager of the host 
company, presented Dr. J. D. Gordon, 
of the General Household Utilities 
Co., Carl D. Boyd, Grunow's western 
manager, and Connelly's sales man- 
ager, W. R. McCurdy. 

+ Davidson Sales Co., South 
Bend, Ind., held "open house" for 
100 dealers last month to give J. E. 
Davidson, its president, a chance to 
get the 19 36 line over. Martin Seuss, 
local sales manager, described the 
new sets. 

* Radolek Co., 63 8 W. Randolph 
St., Chicago, headed by enterprising 
W. C. Braun, is one distributor who 
double-checks the performance of 
new products in order to keep all his 
stock in demand. One thing, Braun 
maintains a sales laboratory to test 
merchandise and to eliminate "duds." 
Also, Radolek has a radio parts store, 
where servicemen buy items listed in 
the Radolek catalog. 



* Central Kentucky dealers, or 
75 of them who sell Crosley sets, 
went to Lexington, Ky., September 
12 to the 1936 banquet staged by 
the Cooper-Louisville Co. of Louis- 
ville, Ky. J. E. Johnson and J. J. 
Crider represented the latter com- 
pany, and C. H. Carey gave the main 
address. 

* C. W. Steltzriede, radio man- 
ager for the Saginaw Hardware Co., 

Saginaw, Mich., sponsored a special 
showing of 1936 Crosley radios last 
month with 6 3 dealers from his 
Northern Michigan territory in tow. 
W. W. Carroll, district manager, 
managed the presentation act. 

* Aeolian Company of Missouri, 
St. Louis, recently appointed 14 new 
RCA-Victor dealers: A. Dirksen & 
Sons, Springfield, 111.; The Bruce 
Company, Springfield, 111.; H. C. 
Asel Appliance Co., Jefferson City, 
Mo.; Taylor Furniture Co., Columbia, 
Mo., and the following in the city of 
St. Louis: Fred Schmidt Appliance 
Co., Allen Radio & Supply Co., Houts 
Radio Co., Mack Electric Co., Schop- 
per Radio Co., Springer Electric Co., 
McClendon Radio Co., Rite Furniture 
Co., Weber Brothers, and L. Naes 
Radio & Refrigerator Co. 

* F. R. Gooding Co., Inc., Spar- 
ton jobbers of Wilmington, Del., 
have reported the recent appoint- 
ment of 6 new dealers in the area. 
These include Walhar Bros., Wil- 
mington; McMahon Bros., Wilming- 
ton; C. L. McCabe, Selbyville; 
George H. Waples, Milton, Peterman 
Radio Co., Milford; Delaware Light 
and Power Co., Milford. 

The Gooding company further 
announced that R. P. Gooding has 
been named as radio parts manager. 

* Zenith Radio Distributing Co., 

Chicago, has added 7 new salesmen 
to the organization to sell battery 
sets in rural Illinois. 

+ Metropolitan Electrical Supply 
Co., Chicago, has been named as the 
exclusive wholesale distributor for 
Fada home and auto receivers in 
the Chicago area. Edmund W. Getke 
is Metropolitan's president, and Sol 
S. Mandel secretary and treasurer. 

•*• W. L. Coutts, for the past 5 
years general manager of the Motor 
Equipment Co., has a new distributor 
set-up at Salt Lake City, Utah. W. L. 
Coutts, Inc., will handle Atwater 
Kent radios and Leonard refrigera- 
tion. 

■k Some 12 5 dealers in West 
Texas district were guests of the 
Shield Co., Inc., Fort Worth, early 
last month. W. W. Slaughter, vice- 
president and general manager of 
Shields, was the head man. 

+ Wholesale Radio Service Co., 
Inc., of New York City, began ac- 
tivity in the Chicago territory Sep- 
tember 21 with the opening of a new 
branch office on West Jackson Blvd. 
General manager is S. W. Berk; 
purchasing agent is Marvine Roye, 
and office manager is J. E. Synder. 
Technical staff for the new branch 
includes Arthur Rattray, Ed De- 
Cancq, John Morgan, Earl Ruleson, 
and Edward Hoffman. 



32 



Radio Today 



TRADE NEWS 



MALLORY DRY-COXDEXSER 
PATENTS UPHELD 

• The Ruben dry-electro- 
lytic condenser patents, Nos. 1,710,073 
and 1,714,191, have just been upheld 
by the United States District Court for 
the Eastern District of New York. In 
an opinion by Judge Marcus B. Camp- 
bell in the case of Ruben Condenser 
Company and P. R. Mallory & Co., Inc., 
against Copeland Refrigeration Cor- 
poration, the Court declared both pat- 
ents valid, and also held them in- 
fringed by dry-electrolytic condensers 
made by Delco Products Corporation 
and supplied to Copeland in conjunc- 
tion with electric motors. The decision 
directs the entry of a decree for in- 
junction against future infringement. 
P. R. Mallory & Co., Inc., of Indian- 
apolis, Ind., is the exclusive licensee 
under patents 1,710,073 and 1,714,191, 
as well as other Ruben patents relating 
to dry-electrolytic condensers. Sub- 
licenses are held by The Magnavox 
Company, Sprague Specialties Com- 
pany. Cornell-Dubilier Corporation, 
Condenser Corporation of America and 
the Aerovox Corporation. Copies of 
Judge Campbell's opinion will be fur- 
nished upon request to P. R. Mallory 
& Co., Inc. 

• The Muter Co., Chi- 
cago, reports the appointment of 
Fred B. Stevens as Midwestern Sales 
Manager. S,tevens had 11 years in 
radio, with Magnavox, Rola, and 
Quam-Nichols. 

■* A note from Ernest 
■T. Kranse, president and founder of 
Radiobar. says that the company has 
announced the appointment of Roger 
Thompson as division manager. C. 
T. Hillman is eastern manager. 

• Marcia Susan Stevens 
is the name of the young lady who 
arrived recently at the homestead 
of E. F. Stevens, Jr., vice-president 
and general manager of Decca Rec- 
ords, Inc. This young lady, who 
made a debut during the Radio 
Show, tipped the scale at well over 
eight pounds. 

+ Fred Strayer, Chi- 
cago representative for the Hygrade- 
Sylvania Corp., is receiving the sym- 
pathy of his many friends in the 
trade upon the death of his mother 
who was killed in an automobile ac- 
cident September 27th en route from 
Emporium, Pa., to her home in Wil- 
mette, Illinois. 

• J. AY. Mclver, sales 
promotion manager of the General 
Electric Co., Bridgeport, Conn., 
bought the cigars and the drinks for 
practically everyone at the Radio 
Show, September 19th; the occasion 
being the arrival of a second heir to 
the Mclver fortunes. 

• Hygrade Sylvania 
Corp., Emporium, Pa., has appointed 
Virgil Graham engineer in charge of 
its tube-application laboratory. Mr. 
Graham resigned late last month as a 
Stromberg-Carlson engineer and took 
up the Hygrade work. During the 
last 12 years, Graham has been ac- 
tively associated with industry stand- 



ardization for the Radio Manufac- 
turers' Association, the Standards 
Section of the RMA Engineering Di- 
vision, the Underwriters' Labora- 
tories Industry Conference, the Insti- 
tute of Radio Engineers, and other 
organizations in the industry. 

+ A niighty pleasant 
get-together party in celebration of 
the first home game of the World 
Series was staged by Ford, Browne 
and Mathews, well-known Chicago ad- 
vertising agency, on October 4th. The 
party would have been perfect if the 
Cubs had won but notwithstanding 
their defeat, a good time was had by 
all. Among those who dropped in to 
say "Hello" during the course of the 
afternoon were R. G. Zenda, general 
sales manager, Lenz Elec. Mfg. Co.; 
D. E. Bright, president of Gen-E-Mo- 
tor Company; R. B. Smith, general 
manager of Consolidated Radio Prod- 
ucts Co.; Howard Briggs, general 
sales manager of Howard Radio 
Company, and others. 

•*• R. B. Smith, general 
manager of the Consolidated Radio 
Products Co. of Chicago, manufac- 
turer of Nathaniel Baldwin speaker 
products, announced recently the ap- 
pointment of Harry Fox as Pacific 
Coast representative of his company 
and also the appointment of Harold 
Bretton, 200 Broadway, as represen- 
tative in the important New York 
territory. 

• The radio speaker 
industry welcomed to its midst last 
month a member of the fair sex in 
the person of Miss Bert Engel, for 
many years an executive for the Utah 
Radio Products Co. This talented 
and capable lady is now directing the 
destinies of the Vitavox Sales Co. 
with headquarters at 130 7 South 
Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

• "Les Muter Day" in 

honor of this popular radio executive 
was fittingly celebrated October 3rd 
at the Calumet Country Club mark- 
ing the close of the golfing season 
for the Chicago Radio cohorts. The 
golf scores were remarkably low, but 
we were informed that after dark 
some exceptional bridge hands were 
passed upon by Jack Scanlon, gen- 
eral sales manager of Utah Radio 
Products Co., aided by Burt Browne 
and Ralph Mathews of the advertis- 
ing firm of Ford, Browne and 
Mathews. 



* Albany, capital city 
of the Empire State, was well repre- 
sented at the epoch-making RCA- 
Victor banquet on October 9th 
through the medium of Max Landy, 
president, and Max Hegleman, gen- 
eral sales manager of the Capital 
City Distributing Co., RCA distribu- 
tors in that territory. Max No. 1, 
and Max No. 2, as they are known to 
their intimates, not only spoke en- 
thusiastically on business conditions 
in the Albany district, but told their 
friends at the press table how they 
had been shaking hands with Gov- 
ernor Lehman at regular intervals 
during the past year or so. 



OSCILLOGRAPH 



by 
NATIONAL 
UNION 




EXCLUSIVE 
NEW DESIGN 
SWEEP 
CIRCUIT 






uali 



lix 

i for the 



rity 



250.000 cycles 
and permits inspection oE waves 
to above 1.000.000 cycles. The 
only commercial oscillograph 
having an adjustable linear sweep 
circuit extending above the audi 
range. All controls on front panel 
except- two position controls on side 
near front. Thirteen outstanding fea- 
tures. Get complete ^details and lean 



National Unit 






OTHER INSTRUMENTS 

Remember you can get many types of instruments free 
with National Union tube purchases. Send coupon for 
latest information 



NATIONAL UNION RADIO CORPORATION OF N. Y. 
570 Lexington Ave., New York, N. Y, 

Send me complete information about free servi 
shop equipment. '_ The N. U. oscillograph. Q 

Name. 



RT 1035 




Teor out this ad and 
pin fo Y^^** er_ 
head -'£&f ¥$EE copy 
'the NEW UTAH 
General Catalog of 
vitalized radio parts 

RADIO PRODUCTS CO., Orleans St., Chicago 



October. 1935 



33 




"QUIET" ... is the insistent de- 
mand of millions who today own 
all-wave receiving sets. Give them 
what they want, by installing 



01f£*mAfT€R 



ALL- WAVE ANTENMA • 



This remarkable unit, A.A.K. pat- 
ented and engineered with tradi- 
tional CORWICO thoroughness, is 
actually AUTOMATIC electrically 
— no adjustment is needed and no 
manual operation is required, once 
"NOISE-MASTER" is properly 
installed. 

FOR EVERY SET AND 

LOCATION 

"NOISE-MASTER" picks up and clari- 
fies feeble oversea signals, straining 
out the "man-made" static that some- 
times seems to make radio a curse 
instead of a blessing. Minimizing the 
noises caused by household appliances 
near the set, "NOISE-MASTER" im- 
proves broadcast as well as shortwave 
reception. It successfully operate* 
more than one set from a single aerial. 
We guarantee that "NOISE-MASTER" 
will eliminate noise when properly in- 
stalled, and urge you to recommend it 
at every opportunity. 



LIST PRICE 



6 




Send for latest complete literature describing this 
and other up-to-the-minute antenna units 

CORNISH WIRE CO., Inc. 
30 Church St. New York Citv 



SALES STIMULATORS 

New promotion material available from leading 
manufacturers 



FOOTBALL SPECIAL 

■*■ Hygrade Sylvania's 
"Radio Log" will have a new feature 
this Fall. Revised programs will in- 
clude a complete intercollegiate foot- 
ball schedule for all the important 
American teams, presenting the com- 
plete data on the times and location 
of the main clashes. Regular fea- 
tures of Sylvania's log are its geo- 
graphical set-up, its black type mega- 
cycle digits in short-wave lists, and 
its time schedules for all zones. 

NEW GUIDE FOR SERVICEMEN 

* Electrad, Inc., 173-5 
Varick St., New York City, has 
printed for the benefit of servicemen 
a volume control guide of 100 pages 
which lists the replacement controls 
"for practically every radio receiver 
built since the inception of broad- 
casting." Opposite every set model 
number, the booklet lists the speci- 
fications of the appropriate Electrad 
control, its resistance in ohms, and 
the price. 

Electrad engineers worked for 6 
months on this book; the distribu- 
tion will be limited to 5,000. The 
guide will be given entirely free to 
servicemen and dealers who return 
to Electrad the top flap of one of its 
new volume control cartons. 

NEW INFO ON CIRCUITS 

+ Two new booklets 
have been issued by Standard Trans- 
former Corp., 850 Blackhawk St., 
Chicago, dealing with "Sound Ampli- 
fier Circuits" and "Amateur Trans- 
mitter Circuits." Former brochure 
illustrates and describes a series of 
audio amplifier circuits which have 
been selected for superior perform- 
ance and power output. 

In "Amateur Transmitter Cir- 
cuits," the plans shown range from 
low power, inexpensive designs to the 
more involved and costly circuits, 
both for C. W. and phone transmit- 
ters. This booklet is 12 cents, and 
the other is priced at 10 cents to 
cover mailing. 

EMERSON-C.I.T. FINANCING 
ARRANGEMENT 

* Arrangements have 
just been completed between Com- 
mercial Investment Trust Corpora- 
tion (C.I.T. ) and Emerson Radio and 
Phonograph Corporation wherein the 
latter's dealers may avail themselves 
of deferred-payment financing ser- 
vice. Complete details have been 
sent to Emerson distributors who, in 
turn, are outlining the plan to their 
dealers. 

Briefly, the plan calls for credit 
investigations, the immediate local 
discounting of dealer paper, and 
time-payment collection by C.I.T. on 
sales of sets. 



In a bulletin to the trade, Emerson 
states that "no dealer today can hope 
to obtain a full quota of larger units 
of business from his market unless 
he is equipped to meet the deferred 
payment buying requirements of his 
prospective purchasers." Emerson 
prefers to know that the same high- 
grade, low-cost dignified financing 
service is available to all of its dealer 
organizations uniformly everywhere 
and has therefore arranged with 
C.I.T. to operate its official plan for 
financing deferred-payment retail 
sales of Emerson Radio. 

DISPLAY USES 
TELEVISION EFFECT 

■*• A new animated elec- 
trical window display, centered 
around a panel lighted from within 
and having the appearance of a movie 
screen, is being offered to Kadette 
dealers by International Radio Corp. 
of Ann Arbor, Mich. A succession 
of easy-to-watch pictures appear on 




the central panel and the series pro- 
duces a "travel-read" sales message. 
Outfit comes with a second auxiliary 
reel which shows photographic repro- 
ductions of Kadette models. 

The somewhat mysterious lighting 
effect on the panel suggests television 
to the pedestrian. The structure is 
substantial enough to support actual 
radio sets, 36 inches high and 54 
inches long, made of heavy litho- 
graphed board. 

PRICES IN CODE 

• Dale Parts, Inc., 2 9 
Murray St., New York City, has just 
issued one of the most impressive- 
and interesting catalogues released 
by any distributor in recent years. 
This company, which is one of the 
foremost jobbers in New York City, 
handles a varied line of parts and 
accessories made by prominent manu- 
facturers, and this new catalogue 
gives complete information including 
manufacturers' specifications on re- 
placement parts, tubes, supplies, am- 
plifiers, sound systems, sets, aerial 
equipment, wire, etc. 

The book is divided into eleven 
sections and features a tab index 
that is of immeasurable value as a 
time saver. One of the most impor- 
tant innovations is the presentation 
of list prices in code so that the 



34 



Radio Today 



DOUBLE-PURPOSE WINDOW 




+ Exceptional window 
display is being offered by United 
American-Bosch Radio, in the form 
of a set of suspended placards, ex- 
hibited above a chassis. Posters 
carry dramatic copy on American- 
Bosch features, and can be turned 
over to expose a new one daily. The 
series of placards hangs in a group 
from a line supported by two pillars 
standing at the sides of the display. 
Placards used in this window are 
such that they are well adapted to 
use by salesmen who wish to present 
to customers a brisk and complete 
summary of set features. 

dealer and service man may take the 
catalogue into the customer's home 
without revealing at any time the 
cost figures of the merchandise. 
Maurice Despres, president of Dale 
Parts, Inc., personally supervised 
every detail of his new catalogue, 
three thousand of which are now be- 
ing distributed in the metropolitan 
territory to dealers and service men. 

WINDOW STOPS 'EM 

+ Arcturus Radio Tube 
Co., Newark, N. J., has put in the 
hands of its distributors a dramatic 
new type of window display which 
dealers may easily change for a new 
effect every day. The display pic- 




UMl lUUIifc 




tures various scenes which may be 
tuned in during popular radio broad- 
casts. The display is lithographed in 
7 eye-catching colors, and is a two- 
plane effect carrying sharply executed 
illustrations by well-known artists. 

BULLETIN 

■k The latest dope on 
the subject of "Operating Conditions 
for Class A Power Output Tubes" 
has been collected by the engineer- 
ing department of Ken-Rad Corp., 
Owensboro, Ky., and published in a 
booklet under that title. Treatment 
is comprehensive and material of 
genuine value to service men and 
dealers. 

THIS1FALL— TRADE UP! 

{From page 17) 
when he switches from one to the 
other. 

Many dealers may neglect one of 
the most important policies of all in 
their dealings with salesmen; and 
that is, the value of constant instruc- 
tion of the men. The best salesman 
in the world is apt to get rusty with- 
out guidance and suggestions from 
the boss. 

Salesmen understand 

Make plans now to get your sales- 
men started right this season. If 
you haven't had a sales meeting in 
some time, call one now, and go over 
the selling points of the lines you are 
carrying. Emphasize the new fea- 
tures of this year's sets and make 
sure the men understand them and 
know how to sell them. 

Most important of all, emphasize 
the importance of "trading up" this 
season, and make the men under- 
stand that this Fall offers the best 
opportunity that we have had in 
many years to sell the higher-priced 
receivers. 

And, refresh them on their ability 
to "trade up" by stressing the main 
points of this article. 

1. Demonstrate the small set will- 
ingly if that's what the customer 
asks for. 

2. Don't sell it hard, but don't 
knock it either; leave the way 
open to come back to it if nec- 
essary. 

3. Lead into switching by mention- 
ing some new or unusual feature 
of a higher-priced model. 

4. Take the customer completely 
away from the cheaper model so 
that the better sets can receive 
his full and undivided attention. 

5. Demonstrate the better set, with- 
out making direct comparisons 
or comparative demonstrations. 

6. Emphasize the points in which 
the better set is superior or 
which the smaller set totally 
lacks. 

When your selling efforts are def- 
initely gained toward "trading up," 
and your salesmen follow through 
along the same lines, you will find 
the public willing to spend more for 
radio this season than they have for 
some time. It's in the cards; average 
set prices are up, the better models 
are selling. Make sure your organ- 
ization is keyed up to take fullest 
advantage of an exceedingly bright 
sales situation. 




Actions Speak 

Louder 
Than Words! 

The manufacturer of the 
famous 4 -Pillar Radio 
Tubes is making and de- 
livering all types of the 
new Metal Tubes as initial 
equipment for 1936 re- 
ceivers and for jobber and 
dealer replacement stock. 
• • • 

Raytheon's 34 new ser- 
vice deals are now ready. 
Ask for complete details. 

RAYTHEON 

TRADE- M ABE 

4-PILLAR RADIO TUBES 

RAYTHEON PRODUCTION 
CORPORATION 

30 East 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. 
445 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Illinois 
55 Chapel St., Newton, Massachusetts 
555 Howard Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



October. 1935 



35 



NEW THINGS FROM THE MANUFACTURERS 



HIGH-FEDELITY JUICE 

* High-fidelity non-direc- 
tional crystal microphone. Response 
within 5 db. from 40 to 10,000 cycles. 
Horizontal directivity eliminated. 
High output level — minus 55 db. Uses 
"Grafoil" bimorth crystal element. 
Diffraction, reflection, and phase-shift 
effects completely corrected. Com- 
pletely shielded and moisture-proof. 
Weighs only 6 oz. — 2% in. diameter. 
Shure Brothers Co., 215 W. Huron St., 
Chicago, 111. — Radio Today 

STREAMLINE COMPACT 



8-TUBE SUPERHETERODYNE 




+ Duo-tone table model — 
finished front and back. Six-tube 
AC-DC superhet. Dual range 530-4,300 
kc. Automatic volume control. Illu- 
minated horizontal sliding scale. 
Built-in line filter. Rust-proof chassis 
and dust-proof dynamic speaker. Hand- 
rubbed cabinet. Model 106— list $34.95. 
Emerson Radio & Phonograph Corp., 
Ill Eighth Ave., New York City.— 
Radio Today 

RMA STANDARDIZED 
TUBE TESTER 




•*• Tube tester with selec- 
tive switching — tests all types under 
load. Elements tested separately. Leak- 
age revealed by sensitive neon bulb — 
tested while hot. Meets specifications 
of RMA standards. Cover provided for 
portability. Model 420 — net $29.94. 
Triumph Mfg. Co., 4017 W. Lake St., 
Chicago, 111. — Radio Today 




*• All-wave superhet with 
8 metal tubes. Triple-tuned i.f. for 
true fidelity — 12 in. full-range speaker. 
Double action automatic volume con- 
trol — logarithmic manual control. 
Dual-ratio tuning — separate dial for 
accurate logging. Antenna matching 
coils automatically switched as band 
changes. Three bands — 540 to 18,000 kc. 
Arvin model 81M— list $99.50. Noblitt- 
Sparks Industries, Columbus, Ind. — 
Radio Today 



FARM BATTERY CHARGER 




* Charger for six volt bat- 
teries. Propeller automatically ad- 
justs self to wind conditions — speed 
control safeguards generator from 
overload. Cut-out prevents over- 
charging. Ammeter shows rate of 
charge. Mounts atop barn or house. 
Special co-operative price of $10 to 
purchasers of Crosley battery radios. 
Ace Products Corp., Cincinnati, Ohio — 
Radio Today 

* Wind-driven battery 
charger for 6-volt batteries. Aeroplane 
type propeller operates with light 
wind. Generator has cut-off — battery 
cannot be overcharged. Deluxe model 
has capacity of two batteries. Dis- 
tributed by Zenith Radio Corp., to 
owners of Zenith farm radios at spe- 
cial co-operative prices. List $29.50 for 
utility model. Wincharger Corp., 2702 
Hawkeye Drive, Sioux City, Iowa — 
Radio Today 



COMPACT PHONE TRANSMITTER 

* Phone transmitter suit- 
able for police, portable broadcast, or 
amateur use. Conservative power out- 
put of 40 watts — 100 percent grid mod- 
ulated. Crystal-controlled oscillator- 
dual power supplies. Meter indication 
of modulation percentage — over-mod- 
ulation indicator. Antenna matching 
network. Self-contained — 21^4 in- x 
18 in. x 12 in. high. Operating con- 
trols on panel. Complete and ready to 
operate — model 45 A— list $483.85. 
Collins Radio Co., Cedar Rapids, Iowa 
— Radio Today 



HIGH FIDELITY, 12 TUBES 




* All-wave true-fidelity su- 
perheterodyne. Pre-selection on all 
wave-lengths. Range switch illumi- 
nates desired dial range, selects proper 
antenna— 520 to 23,000 kc. Acoustical 
labyrinth and wide angle sound diffu- 
sion for faithful reproduction — 15 
watts output. Dual-ratio tuning dial 
plus tuning meter give ease of con- 
trol. Glass rectifier and 11 metal 
tubes. Model 84— list $275. Strom- 
berg Carlson Telephone Mfg. Co., 
Rochester, N. Y. — Radio Today 



NEW 5Z4 RECTIFIER 




* New type 5Z4 metal tube 
— reduced size — no loss in electrical 
characteristics. Metal shell 3% in. x 
1 5/16 in. diameter. Filament cur- 
rent reduced to 1.5 amps. Rating of 
125 mils with 400 volts (rms) per 
plate. Will replace octal glass 5Y3 
rectifier. Hygrade Sylvania Corp., 
Emporium, Penna. — Radio Today 



36 



Radio Todav 



INTERFERENCE FILTER 




* Condenser-type line fil- 
ter. Square metal case with plug 
prongs fitting electric outlet. Case 
fastened and grounded to face plate by 
two screws. Integral receptacle takes 
attachment plug of receiver. May be 
used to isolate noise producing device 
from line. Aerovox Corp., Brooklyn, 
N. Y — Radio Today. 



HIGH-FIDELITY CONSOLE 

* Ten metal tube console 
— shadow tuning — dual-speed, rubber- 
drive vernier dial. Selectivity-fidelity 
control. All wave— 540 to 18,000 kc. 
Pull vision dial — one scale at a time. 
Mechanism controlled by band switch. 
Dual-section tuning condensers for 
easy tuning on low waves. Overspaced 
oscillator condenser. Modern type 
walnut cabinet. Model 810G — list $149. 
Atwater Kent Mfg. Co., 4700 Wissa- 
hickon Ave., Philadelphia, Penna. — 
Radio Today 



METAL TUBE CHECKING 
ADAPTER 




* Universal adapter for 
testing metal tubes in type 36 socket 
of any tube checker. Three octal 
sockets. Tests everyone of the ten 
metal tubes — two toggle switches for 
thorough and complete test of tubes. 
List price — $6.50. Alden Products Co., 
Brockton, Mass. — Radio Today 

FOREIGN SHORT-WAVE AND 
BROADCAST SUPERHETERODYNE 




dial printed in colors. Tone control, 
automatic overload control, and slow 
motion tuning. AC models — glass or 
metal tubes. AC-DC models — glass, 
or metal and glass. Hand polished 
walnut veneer cabinet. Freed-Eisemann 
model T-367-S. Freed Mfg. Co., 127 
West 17th St., New York City.— Radio 
Today 

UNIT CONSTRUCTION, HI FI 




* Metal tube superhetero- 
dyne. Variable high fidelity— 3500 to 
7500 cycles. Shadowgraph tuning 
meter — dual-speed tuning — individ- 
ually-lighted tuning arrow. Meter off 
in hi-fi position — assures correct 
tuning with normal fidelity. Range 
550-18,500 and 150-350 kc. Centro- 
matic unit construction. Model 595P 
— list $139.50. United American Bosch 
Corp., Springfield, Mass. — Radio To- 
day 

BINDING MEDIUM FOR 
CATHODE-RAY SCREENS 

* Binding medium for 
flourescent powders used in screen of 
cathode-ray tubes. Patented substance 
free from injurious impurities applied 
with spray gun. Premature drying 
and hardening prevented. Riedel- 
de Haen's binding medium. Pfaltz and 
Bauer. Inc., 300 Pearl St., New York 
City — Radio Today 

ALLOY COIL CORES 




* Dual-band table model, 
super — six tubes. Ranges — 550 to 
1,500, 5,500 to 15,700 kc. Full-vision 



* Core for i.f. and r.f. coils 
— magnesium alloy imbedded in a cera- 
mic body. Shiny metallic finish with 
clean-cut edges — non-corroding and 
permanent characteristics. Doubles Q 



of coil and increases selectivity. Coils 
more compact. Available to experi- 
menters or manufacturers. Henry L. 
Crowley & Co., 1 Central Ave., West 
Orange, N. J. — Radio Today 

SKIP-BAND SUPERHETERODYNE 




* Six metal-tube superhet. 
Dual wave— 540 to 1800 and 5400 to 
18,000 kc. Slide rule tuning with au- 
tomatic vernier — one scale visible at 
a time. Stabilized 8-inch dynamic 
speaker with hum bucking coil. Auto- 
matic volume control — tone control. 
Undistorted output of 2 watts. Mod- 
ified modern cabinet design of hand- 
rubbed walnut. Model A-64. General 
Electric Co., Bridgeport, Conn. — Radio 
Today. 

INSULATED RESISTOR 






+ Metalized resistor with 
high-voltage insulation. Sealed against 
moisture — crack-proof and break-proof. 
Extremely small in size — body of % 
watt is % in. x 3/16 in. diameter. 
Tinned flexible leads moulded to ends. 
Vibration-proof and permanent. Color 
coded and marked — 100 ohms to 10 
megohms. List price — 1 watt $.25, V2 
watt $.20. International Resistance 
Co., 2100 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa — 
Radio Today 

FIVE-BAND ALL-WAVE SUPER 



n 



+ All-wave superhetero- 
dyne—range, 540 to 22,000 and 150 to 
400 kc. Ten metal tubes. Full-vision 
illuminated dial — dual tuning ratio. 
Shadowgraph tuning with automatic 
volume control. Full-floating moving 
coil speaker — tone control. Walnut 
cabinet with unusual grain effect. Con- 
stitution console — list $115. Crosley 
Radio Corp., Cincinnati, Ohio. — Radio 
Today. 



October, 1935 



37 



RADIO RECEIVERS FOR 1935-36 



(Additions to September listing) 



Model Retail Price Kilocycle Power 

Number Complete Cabinet Range Supply 



6E 

6EC 

9E| 

9EC 

15 

42 

58 

66 

201 



Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 



535-18500 

535-18500 

135-18300 

135-18300 

550-1700 

550-1700 

550-4500 

550-18000 

550-18000 



AC 
AC 
AC 

AC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 



Autocrat Radio Co., 3855 N. Hamilton Ave., Chicago, 111. 



4C, 4M 

5 

16-AC-S 

25-AC-L 

26-AC-L 

40, 40M 

40-S-W 

42 

42-S-W 

45 

45-S-W 

52 

52-S-W 

51-UL 

61-UL 

66-US 

260-UL 

518 

618 

661-US 

900 

900 

910 

BA-41 



$15.00 
33.32 
44.32 
42.23 
48.89 
15.00 
18.00 
15.00 
18.00 
18.00 
19.00 
18.00 
19.00 
39.23 
46.10 
43.89 
46.10 
41.10 
45.55 
43.89 
54.50 
70.50 
87.50 
53.33 



Table 
Auto 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Auto 
Auto 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Table 



550-1724 

550-1500 

550*16600 

130*16600 

130*16600 

550-1724 

550-4000 

550-1724 

550-4000 

550-1724 

550-4000 

550-1724 

550-4000 

130*16600 

130*16600 

550*16600 

130*16600 

550-1500 

550-1500 

550*16600 

142-25000 

142-25000 

142-25000 

540*17650 



AC-DC 

6v.DC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

6v.DC 

6v.DC 

AC-DC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

6v.DC 



Balkeit Radio Corp., 549 W. Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



101 

155BA 

AD150 

AD160 

AM151 

AS 152 

GT14A 

GT15B 

GT16A 

GT17B 

GT18A 

GT19B 

GT20 

GT33 

GT34LW 

GT100X 

GT114X 

GT116X 

GT118BX 

GT156BA 

GT157BA 

GT200X 



$44.95 
34.95 
19.95 
29.95 
22.50 
31.95 
31.50 
35.95 
38.45 
39.95 
43.95 
48.95 
57.50 
39.95 
43.95 
64.95 
48.95 
51.95 
62.00 
47.95 
50.00 
79.95 



Auto 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 



Case Electric Corp., Marion, Ind. 



500 
501 
700 
701 
1000 
1001 
1003 



$39.95 
49.95 
55.00 
67.50 
79.50 
99.50 

124.50 



Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 



Broadcast 

540-1800 

540-1715 

540-3000 

540-1715 

540-2720 

530-17600 

530-17600 

530-17600 

530-17600 

530-17600 

530-17600 

530-17600 

530-17600 

150*17600 

530-17600 

530-17600 

530-17600 

540-18000 

530-17600 

540*16500 

530-17600 



545-18000 
545-18000 
545-18000 
545-18000 
545-21000 
545-21000 
545-21000 



6v.DC 

Batt. 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

Batt. 

6v.DC 

6v.DC 

AC 



AC 
AC 
AC 
AC 
AC 
AC 
AC 



Number 
of Tubes 



Air-King Products Co., Inc., 27 Hooper St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



6m. 

6m. 

9m. 

9m. 

5mg. 

4mg. 

5mg. 

6mg. 

6mg. 



5g 



5g 



9m.| 
9m. i 
9m.( 



5c. 

5c. 

7c. 

7c. 
10c. 
10c. 
10c. 



Commonwealth Radio Mfg. Co. (Com-Rad), 4846 Lincoln Ave., Chicago 
111. 



15 

25 

16 

26 

17 

27 

551 

251 

661 

261 

660 

260 



Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 



540*18500 
135*18500 
540*18500 
135*18500 
540*18500 
135*18500 
540*18500 
135*18500 
540*18500 
135*18500 
540*18500 
135*18500 



AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 



Consolidated Radio Products Co tJ 

Detroit, Mich. 



(Royal) Box 23, Northwestern Sta., 



R4M 


$21.00 


Table 


540-4000 


AC-DC 


4g. 


R4Z 


15.95 


Table 


550-1750 


AC-DC 


4g. 


R5C 


22.50 


Table 


540-4000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


R5D 


30.50 


Table 


540-4000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


R5DB 


37.25 


Table 


540-4000 


6v.DC 


5g. 


R5DC 


39.25 


Cons. 


540-4000 


AC-DC 


5g. 



c. indicates combination of metal tubes and glass tubes in receiver 
g. indicates glass tubes in receiver 
m. indicates metal tubes in receiver 
mg. indicates metal-glass tubes in receiver 

* in kilocycle range indicates not continuous range between limits indicated 
** less batteries 
t includes batteries 



Model 
Number 



Retail Price 
Complete 



Kilocycle 
Range 



Power 
Supply 



Number 
of Tubes 



R5DF 

R6G 

R6GC 

R6GM 

R6GMC 

R8J 

R8JC 

R8JM 

R8JMC 

RTA 

RTS 



39.50 
39.50 
58.25 
46.50 
64.50 
69.50 
85.50 
78.50 
95.00 
37.50 
34.00 



Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Auto 
Auto 



540-4000 

540-16000 

540-16000 

540-16000 

540-16000 

150-22000 

150-22000 

150-22000 

150-22000 

540-1600 

540-1600 



32v.DC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

6v.DC 

6v.DC 



5g. 
5g. 



6m. 
6m. 



8m. 
8m. 
5g. 
5g. 



Continental Radio & Television Corp. 

Chicago, 111. 



(Admiral), 325 W. Huron St., 



ML156 


$39.75 


Table 


540-17000 


AC 


6c. 


ML215A 


52.00 


Cons. 


540-17000 


AC 


6c. 


ML266 


42.00 


Table 


540-17000 


AC 


6c. 


ML477 


49.75 


Table 


540-17000 


AC 


7c. 


ML481 


67.50 


Cons. 


540-17000 


AC 


7c. 


MX218 


48.50 


Cons. 


540-17000 


AC 


6c. 


MX239 


34.50 


Table 


540-17000 


AC 


6c. 


MX241 


36.00 


Table 


540-17000 


AC 


6c. 


X112 


29.75 


Table 


540-17000 


AC 


5g. 


X118 


44.50 


Cons. 


540-17000 


AC 


5g. 


X141 


32.00 


Table 


540-17000 


AC 


5g. 


X341 


39.75 


Table 


150-17000 


AC-DC 


6g- 


X541 


34.00 


Table 


540-17000 


AC-DC 


6g. 


X641 


42. 00** 


Table 


540-17000 


Batt. 


6g. 


X718 


52.00** 


Cons. 


540-17000 


Batt. 


6g. 


Detrola Radio Corp., 3630 West Fort St., Detroit, Mich. 




2B1 




Table 


Broadcast 


Batt. 


5g. 


4WG2 




Table 


545-4000 


AC-DC 


4g. 


4WM3 




Table 


545-4300 


AC-DC 


4c. 


4XG1 




Table 


545-4000 


AC 


4g. 


4XM2 




Table 


545^4000 


AC 


4c. 


5WG1 




Table 


545-4300 


AC-DC 


5g. 


5XG1 




Table 


550*16000 


AC 


5g. 


5XM9 




Table 


550-5400 


AC 


5g. 


5XW2 




Table 


550-16000 


AC 


5g. 


5XM4 




Cons. 


550-16000 


AC 


5c. 


6B1 




Table 


Broadcast 


6v.DC 


6g. 


6M 




Auto 


Broadcast 


6v.DC 


6g. 


6XM1 




Table 


540-18000 


AC 


6c. 


6XM5 




Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


6c. 


6WG1 




Table 


545-18000 


AC-DC 


6g. 


6WM1 




Table 


545-17500 


AC-DC 


6c. 


6WM3 




Cons. 


545-17500 


AC-DC 


6c. 


6XM9 




Table 


540-18000 


AC 


6g. 


6ZM1 




Table 


540-18000 


AC 


6c. 


6ZM3 




Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


6c. 


7ZM1 




Table 


540-18000 


AC 


7c 


7ZM3 




Cons. 


540-18000 


AC 


7c. 


10ZM1 




Table 


150-17500 


AC 


10c. 


10ZM3 




Cons. 


150-17500 


AC 


10c. 


32V 1 




Table 


535-17500 


32v.DC 


7g. 


Espey Mfg. 


Co., 124 East 25 St., New York City 






458 


$56. 50 


Table 


140*15500 


AC 


5g. 


545 


19. 50** 


Table 


550-1700 


Batt. 


4g. 


553 


39.50 


Table 


140*1550 


AC-DC 


5g. 


555 


39.50 


Table 


550*18000 


AC-DC 


5g. 


560 


39.50 


None 


550*18000 


AC-DC 




564 


69.50 


Table 


530*18000 


AC 


6g. 


565 


69.50 


Table 


133*18200 


AC 


6g. 


5181 


58.50 


None 


120-37500 


AC-DC 


18c. 


Fada Radio and Electric Co., Thompson Ave., Long Island City, 


N. Y. 


150C 


$59.95 


Cons. 


535*15800 


AC 


5c. 


150T 


39.95 


Table 


535*15800 


AC 


5c. 


155 


19.99 


Table 


540-1750 


AC-DC 


5g. 


157 


32.95 


Table 


540*6500 


AC-DC 


5c. 


160C 


69.95 


Cons. 


535*18500 


AC 


6m. 


160T 


52.95 


Table 


535*18500 


AC 


6m. 


166 


49.95 


Auto 


530-1550 


6v.DC 


6g. 


170C 


82.95 


Cons. 


535*18500 


AC 


7m. 


170CK 


99.95 


Cons. 


535*18500 


AC 


7m. 


170T 


62.95 


Table 


535*18500 


AC 


7m. 


190C 


124.50 


Cons. 


540-24000 


AC 


9m. 


190CK 


144.50 


Cons. 


540-24000 


AC 


9m. 


190T 


84.50 


Table 


540-24000 


AC 


9m. 


192C 


99.95 


Cons. 


535*18500 


AC-DC 


9c. 


192CK 


124. 75 


Cons. 


535*18500 


AC-DC 


9c. 


192T 


72.50 


Table 


535*18500 


AC-DC 


9c. 


1462D 


39.95 


Table 


530*15800 


AC-DC 


6g. 


Galvin Mfg 


Corp. (Motorola) — additions to Sept. listing 




62 


$39.95 


Auto 


540-1550 


6v.DC 


g- 


79 


49.50 


Auto 


540-1550 


6v.DC 


g. 


110 


64.50 


Auto 


540-1550 


6v.DC 


g. 


Above models designed 


for turret- 


top cars 






F-57 


37.95 


Auto 


540-1550 


6v.DC 


g. 


F-75 


47.50 


Auto 


540-1550 


6v.DC 


g. 


F-100 


64.50 


Auto 


540-1550 


6v.DC 


g. 


Above models designed for 1935 V-8 Ford cars 






Garod Radio Corp., 34 East 12 St 


, New York City 






73 


$69. 00 


Table 


540*19500 


AC 


7g. 


83 


69.50 


Table 


540*19500 


AC-DC 


lie. 


83LW 


74.50 


Table 


140*16000 


AC-DC 


lie. 


311 


79.50 


None 


540*19500 


AC-DC 


lie. 



38 



Radio Today 



Model 

Number 



Retail Price 
Complete 



Kilocycle 
Range 



Power 
Supply 



Number 
of Tubes 



311B 

512A 

512B 

514 

514B 

520 

520B 

M26 

M26C 

M32 

M32C 

M33 

M33LW 

M49 

M104 



109. 50 
115.00 
149. 50 
115.00 
149. 50 
195. 00 
225.00 
53.50 
74.50 
55.00 
69.50 
48.50 
53.50 

75.00 



Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
None 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 



540*19500 
144-36000 
144-36000 
144-36000 
144-36000 
144-36000 
144-36000 
550*16000 
550*16000 
550*16000 
550*16000 
550*16000 
140*16000 
144-18000 
144-18000 



AC-DC 

AC 

AC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC -DC 

AC 

AC-DC 



Gilfillan Bros., Inc., 1815 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 



8A 

42A 

43A 

52A 

53A 

54A 

55A 

62B 

62X 

63B 

63X 

76A 

77A 

96B 

96X 

97B 

97X 

116B 

116X 

117B 

117X 



$67. 50 

18.70 

24.50 

36.50 

36.50 

27.50 

27.50 

37.50 

40.70 

45.95 

53.95 

56.50 

83.00 

85.00 

93. 50 

115.00 

122.00 

125.00 

139. 00 

165. 00 

185. 00 



Auto 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 



550-1750 

550-1712 

550-1712 

550-1712 

550-1712 

550-1712 

550-1712 

550-4000 

550-4000 

550-18000 

550-18000 

550*18000 

550*18000 

550-18000 

550-18000 

550-18000 

550-18000 

550-18000 

550-18000 

550-18000 

550-18000 



6v.DC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC-DC 

AC 

AC-DC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

Batt. 

Batt. 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 



lie. 
12c. 
12c. 
14c. 
14c. 
20c. 
20c. 

6c. 

6c. 

7c. 

7c. 



9c. 
10c. 



4g. 

5g. 

5g. 

5g. 

5g. 

6mg. 

6m. 

6mg. 

6m. 

7g- 

7g. 

9mg. 

9m. 

9mg. 

9m. 
llmg. 
11m. 
llmg. 
11m. 



Karadio Corp., 50 Eleventh Ave., N. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 



150 

160 

180 

Police 

Sheriff 



$39.50 
49.50 
59.50 
54.50 
54.50 



Auto 
Auto 
Auto 
Auto 
Auto 



Broadcast 
Broadcast 
Broadcast 
As specified 
530-2400 



6v.DC 
6v.DC 
6v.DC 
6v.DC 
6v.DC 



Lehman Radio Salon, Inc. (Port-o-matic), 1013 Madison Avenue, New York 

5g. 



10 
12 

12A 



$139. 50 
165.00 
149. 50 



Table 
Table 
Table 



535-1650 
146*1525 
535-1650 



AC-DC 
AC-DC 
AC-DC 



Lang Radio Corp., 3611 Fourteenth Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

60PC $39.95t Table 540-4500 AC-DC 

60UP 13. 50t Table 540-4500 AC-DC 

80NA 31.50f Table 540*16000 AC-DC 
tNet price to dealer 



Noblitt-Sparks Industries (Arvin) — additions to Sept. listing 



51-B 


$24. 95** 


Table 


Broadcast 


Batt. 


4g. 


61-B 


42.95 


Table 


Broadcast 


6v.DC 


5g. 


62-B 


54.50 


Cons. 


Broadcast 


6v.DC 


6g. 


Patterson Radio Co., 


1320 So. Los Angeles Ave., 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


86AW 


$59.50 


None 


550-20000 


AC 


8g. 


106AW 


74.50 


None 


550-20000 


AC 


lOg. 


126AW 


84.50 


None 


550-20000 


AC 


12g. 


186AW 


64.50 


Table 


550-20000 


AC 


8g. 


286AW 


84.50 


Cons. 


550-20000 


AC 


8g. 


386AW 


134. 50 


Cons. 


550-20000 


AC 


8g. 


1106AW 


79.50 


Table 


550-20000 


AC 


lOg. 


1126AW 


89.50 


Table 


550-20000 


AC 


12g. 


2106AW 


99.50 


Cons. 


550-20000 


AC 


lOg. 


2126AW 


109. 50 


Cons. 


550-20000 


AC 


12g. 


3 106 AW 


149. 50 


Cons. 


550-200(10 


AC 


lOg. 


3126AW 


159. 50 


Cons. 


550-20000 


AC 


12g. 


PR16 


149. 50 


Table 


550-39000 


AC 


16g. 


PR16-CK 


209. 50 


Cons. 


550-39000 


AC 


16g. 


PR16-CKP 


269. 50 


Cons. 


550-39000 


AC 


16g. 


PR16-CTS 


139. 50 


None 


550-39000 


AC 


16g. 


PR16-K 


199. 50 


Cons. 


550-39000 


AC 


16g. 


PR16-KP 


259. 50 


Cons. 


550-39000 


AC 


16g. 


Radiobar Co. of America, 7100 McKinley Ave., Los Angeles, 


Calif. 


107 


$99. 50 


Spec. 


540-4000 


AC 


5g. 


507 


174.95 


Spec. 


540-18000 


AC 


6g. 


510 


347. 50 


Spec. 


150-22500 


AC 


Hg- 


528 


268. 50 


Spec. 


145*18000 


AC 


8g. 


536 


294.50 


Spec. 


145*18000 


AC 


8g. 


Remler Co 


, Ltd., 2101 Bryant St. 


San Francisco 


Calif. 




26 


$34.90 


Port. 


540-4100 


AC-DC 


5g. 


36 


59.50 


Auto 


540*6800 


6v.DC 


6g. 


40 


29.90 


Port. 


540-4100 


AC 


4g. 


41 


34.90 


Port. 


540*13000 


AC 


5m 


43 


49.50 


Table 


540-18000 


AC 


7c. 


51 


19.50 


Port. 


540-2400 


AC 


4g. 


62 


36.50 


Table 


540*13000 


AC 


5m 


88 


79.50 


Table 


540*17000 


AC 


10c. 



Model 
Number 



Retail Price 
Complete 



Kilocycle 
Range 



Power 
Supply 



Number 
of Tubes 



Royale Radio Mfg., Co., 1417 W. Pico St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



48 

48A 

53A 

63A 

Radiobowl 



$14.95 
15.95 
19.95 
29.95 
34.95 



Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 



550-1750 

550-1750 

550-1750 

530-16000 

530-16000 



AC 
AC 
AC 
AC 
AC 



Warwick Mfg. Co., 1700 W. Washington Blvd., Chicago, 111. 



418 
511 
530 
530 
540 
618 
635 
635 
725 



Table 
Auto 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Auto 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 



Wilcox-Gay Corp., Charlotte, Mich. 



3J4-11 

3JE5-93 

3JF5-88 

4B6-2 

5A6-89 

5A6-810 

5B5-89 

5BC5-15 

5BC5-830 

5E7-91 

5E7-790 

5F8-90 

5E8-90 

5E9-850 

5F8-790 



$19.95 
23.95 
19.95 
44.90 
39.90 
49.90 
34.90 
36.95 
49.90 
44.90 
69.90 
54.90 
59.90 
79.90 
69.90 



Table 
Table 
Table 
Auto 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Cons. 
Table 
Table 
Cons. 
Cons. 



535-1712 
535-1500 



535*4000 

535-1500 

535*16000 

535*16000 

535*16000 



545-1580 

545*16600 

545-1580 

545-1500 

545-1580 

545-1580 

545*16600 

545*16600 

545*16600 

545*16600 

545*16600 

545*16600 

545*16600 

545*16600 

545*16600 



AC-DC 

6v.DC 

AC 

AC 

Batt. 

6v.DC 

AC 

AC 

Batt. 



Batt. 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

6v.DC 

Batt. 

Batt. 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

6v.DC 

AC 

AC 

6v.DC 



Troy Radio Mfg. Co., 1142 S. Olive St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



4 

4A 

4A 

5A 

15 

51B 

62U 

63 

63B 

74B 

84 

86 

151 

163 

184 

711 



$15.95 
16.95 
17.95 
23.95 
22.50 
29.50 
42.50 
39.50 
39.50 
69.50 
69.50 
39.90 
29.50 
39.50 
69.50 
29.50 



Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Auto 
Table 
Table 
Table 
Table 



550-1720 

550-1720 

550-1720 

550-1720 

550-1720 

550-1720 

550*19000 

550-19000 

550-19000 

550-19500 

550-19500 

550-1500 

550-1720 

550-19000 

550-19500 

550-1720 



AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

AC 

Batt. 

AC 

AC 

Batt. 

Batt. 

AC 

6v.DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC-DC 

AC 



6g. 



5g. 
5g. 
5g. 

7g 

7g. 

8g 

8m. 

9m. 



4g. 

4g- 

4mg. 

5g. 

5g 

5g. 

6g. 

6m. 

6g. 

7g. 



5g. 
6c. 



'/MUTER Interfe, 



f erenceniiers 




'Man Made 
Interference/ 



'Traffic Cop" of 
■*" Radio absolutely elimi- 
nates the man-made interference that 
comes in over the power line by merely 
attaching the Filter directly to the set itself. 
Sell these filters with confidence and guarantee 
their operation, because they will do the job. 
There's a real need for them. Write Dept. T-10. 

Ask your jobber or take advantage of our trial offer. 

— MAIL THIS COUPON 

THE MUTER COMPANY 

1255 South Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 

Please ship me one Muter Interference 
Filter at your trial offer of $1.80 ($3.00 list, 
less 40%). □ I am enclosing $1.80 □ Ship it C. O. D. for $1.80. 














State 







October, 1935 



39 



SELLING RECORDS 



* RECORD merchandiser of one 
of the largest department stores in 
New York City makes the rousing 
report that not a day passes but that 
shoppers at the record counter are 
heard to ask, "a combination radio — 
what is that — long wave and short 
wave ?" 

According to this source, the man- 
ufacturers have been talking "ma- 
chinery" rather than "music," and 
have failed to make it clear to a large 
number of very busy and preoccupied 
people, just what a combination radio 
and record-player is, and what it can 
offer. Hundreds of these people 
would buy the combination, rather 
than the straight radio, when they 
choose an instrument, if they were 
wise to the extra advantage. 

Breathless, this wide-awake record 
seller goes on to say that many fans 
have missed altogether the amazing 
difference to be noted between the 
old-style record-players, and the new 
reproducers available in combination 
sets. It appears that nobody has 
bothered to drive the point home, but 



AUDAX 



rr Tbe standard 

by tvhich others are 

jttdged and valued" 

J.N leading Radio Stations, 
Laboratories and Universities — 
wherever superlative pick-up 
performance is demanded — you 
find AUDAX doing duty. Engi- 
neered to the wth power, im- 
mune to summer heat and other 
climatic conditions. Made to 
suit every demand from the 
humblest midget-combination to 
the HIGH FIDELITY require- 
ments of fine transcriptions. 
List prices from $9.50 to $390 
each. What is your pick-up 
problem? 
Special Recording Heads to Order 

Al OAK COMPANY 
..OO Filth Ave., ft>w York 

■■Creators oj High Grade Electrical 
and Acoustical Apparatus Since 1^15" 




No. 33 
(Needle Ballast) 
Listed at $24.50 



given half a chance, the combinations 
would sell themselves. This observer 
is not to be fooled on the subject; the 
counter has sold 100,000 Red Seal 
records in the last three years, and in 
the trend of the business it was no- 
ticed that when the store wanted to 
take the burden of a little enlighten- 
ment itself, immediate results were 
forthcoming. A small and pointed ad, 
aimed to remove the real difficulty in 
the business, would drag in buyers 
a-plenty. 

Popular stuff 

For some time, it has been obvious 
that lovers of fine music constitute a 
healthy part of record buyers; the 
angle that many merchandisers hav<j 
missed on this score, however, is that 
this serious-minded group can very 
often be intrigued by a record of the 
popular sort, if the arrangement is a 
fine one. In shops where this sales 
device has been used recently, the 
rankest jazz tunes have been sold to 
high-brows because they heard a 
sample and liked the arrangement. 

Many dealers consider that the 
monthly albums which some manu- 
facturers are featuring should get 
more emphasis at this particular 
point. The point is that the quality 
of the albums is increasing and if 
record fans really want to keep up 
with musical trends, they'd better get 
started. Direct mail is suggested by 
many as the best medium for promot- 
ing this stunt, this fall. 



Get what they want 

One prominent dealer has sepa- 
rated, in the back of his sales mind, 
his record customers according to 
their generation. His view is that 
the group of people who switched to 
radio exclusively, at the expense of 
recorded music, were the older ones, 
who were content to fall in line with 
radio development and let it go at 
that. He believes that younger peo- 
ple are more open-minded when it 
conies to getting what they want, 
when they want it, which is of course 
the record's big advantage. It would 
anpear that more emphasis should be 
given to the types of record merchan- 
dising which appeal to the young set. 

Among record retailers it was also 
noted that it was a wise trick to play 
up to the people who make a hobby 
out of record buying, and seem to 



Best sellers as we go to press 

VICTOR 
Truckin' — Fox trot. The Girl I Left 
Behind Me — Fox trot. "Fats" Waller 
and his Rhythm — 25116. 

Top Hat — Fox trot. Piccolino — Fox 

trot. Ray Noble and his Orchestra — 
25094. 

Cheek to Cheek — Fox trot. Isn't It A 
Lovely Day? — Fox trot. (Both from 
RKO film "Top Hat") Eddy Duchin and 
his Orchestra — 25093. 

BRUNSWICK 

(Same as last month) 
Cheek to Cheek — Fox trot. No Strings 
— Fox trot. (Both from "Top Hat"). 
Vocal and tap dancing by Fred Astaire 
with Leo Reisman and his Orchestra — 
7486. 

Isn't This a Lovely Day? — Fox trot. 
Top Hat, White Tie and Tails — Fox 

trot. (Both from "Top Hat"). Vocal 
and tap dancing by Fred Astaire with 
Johnny Green and his Orchestra — 7487. 

The Piccolino — Fox trot. (From 'Top 
Hat"). Vocal by Fred Astaire with 
Leo Reisman and his Orchestra. 
Toddlin' Along with You — Fox trot. 
(From "Broadway Joe"). Leo Reisman 
and his Orchestra "with vocal by Frank 
Luther — 74SS. 

DECCA 
Cheek to Cheek — Fox trot with vocal 
trio (from "Top Hat") Broadway 
Rhythm — Fox trot. (From "Broadway 
Melody of 1936".) Guy Lombardo and 
his Royal Canadians — 549. 

Without a Word of W T aming — Vocal 

with Orchestra. Takes Two To Make 
A Bargain: — Vocal with Orchestra. 
(Both from "Two For Tonight".) Bing 
Crosby — 548. 

Accent on Youth — Fox trot. (From 
"Accent on Youth") VC. The Girl I 
Left Behind Me — Fox trot. VC. Oreille 
Knapp and his Orchestra — 554. 



want everything new that appears on 
the releases. This type of buyer, espe- 
cially this fall when the business has 
a new stimulus, should get a very 
complete service from his dealer, so 
that everybody concerned gets the full 
benefit of the new era. Several 
dealers have plans for increasing the 
number of this sort of fan, too, by 
passing around the dope on what a 
kick the vets got out of this hobby, 
and by giving customers the idea that 
it certainly is not too late to start 
now. 




Victor's best-selling Fats Waller 



40 



Radio Today 



the NEKJU in Rnoio . mid HLL thbt is Heuj I 





THE 
CROSLEY FIVER 

Table and Console 




CHASSIS — Five-lube super- 
heterodyne. Two bands — Standard 
and police, amateur, aviation broad- 
casts. Illuminated full-vision air- 
plane type dial — 5 to 1 ratio drive. 
Tone control. New 6B5 Triple-Twin 
output tube. Full floating moving 
coil electro-dynamic speaker. 

CABINETS — Half an eye can see 
their beauty and charm — equal in 
every way to their superb tone. Be- 
tween these and the Constitution 
models are a full range of receivers 
for every purse and type of use. 



From the Fiver, giving standard, 
police, aviation, amateur reception 
for $19.99 to the CONSTITUTION 
five-band metal tube all-wave that 
gets virtually all that's on the air . . . 
the new Crosley 1936 Line leads the 
field. In every price range the Cros- 
ley gives more for the money in 
beauty, performance, selectivity . . . 
in everything that makes for radio 
satisfaction. 



FEATURES! Innovations! Master- 
strokes of engineering. In this new 
1936 radio line Crosley has tapped all 
the resources of experience dating back 
to the pioneering stage; all the creative- 
ness and inventiveness of today. Never 
has a line so stepped out to capture the 
imagination of a country. Never a line 
with so many "want-able" features. 
Never a line with equal value for the 
radio dollar. 

The beauty of the line is alone an eye-stopper 
anywhere. But the more you explain the in- 
built quality, the new features, the reason for 
the extraordinary^ tone, selectivity, truthfulness 
of reproduction . . . the more your customers 
will select — from this line — the set that best fits 
their means and their wants. 
Everywhere the groundwork of SALES is 
being laid with this line. Get in on this from 
the start by getting in touch with your Crosley 
distributor. 

THE CROSLEY RADIO CORPORATION 

CINCINNATI POWEL CROSLEY. Jr.. President 

Home of "the Nation's Station"— WLW— 500.000 watts 

— most powerful in the world — 70 on your dial. 

Prices in Florida, Rocky Mountain States 
and West slightly higher. 




THE 

CROSLEY CONSTITUTION 

Table and Console 




AMONG THE FEATURES... 

Three-pang tuning condenser with many notable improvements. 

New velvet action two-speed dial — planetary ball-bearing drive. 

New high-wattage, metal-to-metal tone control — far superior 

to conventional tone control. 

New triple-tuned I. F. transformer — far better selectivity, higher fidelity. 

New H-Q-4-Iayer bank wound Litzendraht broadcast coils — providing 

better signal-to-noise ratio. 

All-metal tube and all-glass tube models — a set for every need. 

NEW SHADOW TUNING. NEW 5-COLOR AIRPLANE DIAL 

NEW COLOR-BAND DESIGNATION. 



CHASSIS 

This all-wave 10-tube superhetero- 
dyne using all-metal tubes, com- 
mands the air. Five bands, receiving 
American, foreign, weather, amateur, 
police, aviation broadcasts. Shadow 
tuning. Automatic volume control. 
Full-vision airplane type dial. Tone 
control. Dual ratio tuning control. 
Full floating moving coil electro- 
dynamic speaker. 



rft 



f &u%e 




WITH 






Panorama of W O R 50 K\V Broadcast Station 

ISOLANTITE PLAYS AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN 
THE MODERN BROADCAST TRANSMITTER 

The 50 KW. Transmitter recently built by Western 
Electric for Station WO R employs ISOLANTITE 
liberally. 

In this up-to-date station are strain insulators, concen- 
tric transmission line spacers and end seals, stand-offs, 
switches, shafts, inductance supports, power and rec- 
tifier tube supports, condenser cases, pedestals and 
many other parts of ISOLANTITE. 

To improve your equipment, specify ISOLANTITE 
insulation. Isolantite inc., 233 Broadway, New York, 
N.Y. Factory at Belleville, N.J. 

Represented by GRAYBAR ELECTRIC CO. 




CERHIT1IC inSULfll DR5 





gf§H WfammSll 



A 



§ 





» 



▲ 



$1 Yearly 



Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexinston Ave. 



New York City 



General Outlook 

— business spurts to highest peak 
since '29 

— index ranges 21% above 1934 

— automobile activity doubles 

— employment up; 1 ,000,000 more 
get jobs 

— individual earnings up 12%; more 
money to spend for radios 

— Christmas Clubs' $300,000,000 
ready Dec. 2; how much will radio 
dealers get? 

Broadcasts that Sell Sets 

— $82,000,000 total to Dec. 1 

— 1 1 -month totals 1 7% ahead of '34 

— November; NBC over $3,000,000; 
CBS $1,704,000 

— Ethiopian re-broadcasts featured 

— Christmas novelties ahead 

— ultra short-waves new coverage 

Radio Trade 

— warm Fall delayed retail buying 

— sales volume still 20% ahead 

— some factories up 50% over '34 

— plan doubling production for '36 

— metal-tubes catch up 

— installment selling grows 

Auto Radio 

— auto shows reveal growing impor 
tance of car radio 

— estimate 1935 sales at 1,000,000 
auto sets 

— metal roofs increase 

— metal-tube sets for auto use soon 




An Industry Opportunity! 

If dealers and service managers, each 
time they get a call to repair a 
"radio set out-of-order", will have 
the repairman 

TAKE ALONG A NEW RADIO 

LEAVE IT WITH THE CUS- 
TOMER to enjoy, until his 
regular set is working again. 
Then 
SELL THE CUSTOMER on 

keeping that new radio to 
use as a SECOND SET 

— for upstairs' 

— for the kitchen 

— for the young people 

— for the old folks 

— for the nursery 

— for the game-room 

— for the work-shop 

— for the maid's room 

Each such sale will mean 

Extra Commissions for the Service 
Man 

More convenience for the customer 

Additional listeners for the 

BROADCAST STATIONS 

Extra profits for the DEALER 
More volume for DISTRIBUTOR 

and MANUFACTURER 
n this way EVERYBODY PROFITS 



If each of the country's 50,000 
service men sold only one set a 
month in this way, that would mean 
an additional 600,000 sets, or 12% 
increase for the year. 



NOVEMBER 



19 3 5 




On the Air, 

as everywhere — it takes 

kip 

in Salesmanship! 

Successful selling today— whether it's on the 
air, on the printed page, or in your own store 
—demands Drama, News, Conviction. In a 
word, Showmanship! 

NBC Showmanship continues to attract and 
hold the largest radio audience in the world. 
Over NBC Networks go the nation's most pop- 
ular sponsored and sustaining programs— nota- 
ble examples of king-pin radio showmanship 
within both the great NBC organization and 
the most progressive advertising agencies. And 
NBC's technical facilities provide the final 
touch of superior showmanship which grips the 
greatest air audiences ever known. 

These audiences are your best— your most im- 
mediate—prospects. These programs are one 
of your greatest sales assets. For the interest, 
the enthusiasm they generate provide the great- 
est incentive for improved receiving sets. To 
snap up your own sales curve, follow the lead 
of America's most successful advertisers: 
dramatize not only the fine instruments, the 
fine products you have for sale, but also the 
outstanding NBC programs! 

iune in the RCA Magic Key Program 
every Sunday 2 to 3 P. M., E. S. T., 
on WJZ and associated NBC stations. 



National Broadcasting Company, Inc. 

A Radio Corporation of America Subsidiary 
NEW YORK - CHICAGO - WASHINGTON • SAN FRANCISCO 



K f VJ 



22 W35 



EMERSON 



$UCTifoflS 



MODELS 



EMERSON "DUO-TONE" Models 106 and 107 
Available in the following actual woods: 

• Matched American Butt Walnut with Mahogany- 
inlay and Ebon base. 

• Deep Mahogany with contrasting Mahogany inlay 
and Ebon base. 

• Curled Maple with Mahogany inlay and Ebon base. 

• Bird's-eye Maple with Mahogany inlay and Ebon 
base. 




^merson. 

(til/tin iln/1 ^ 



Feature it as the Ideal Christmas Gift 



'Emerson 

"RE-CREATES THE ARTIST 



AGAIN this year the "World's 
Biggest Selling Little Radio" 
will be the most widely bought 
and celebrated Christmas Gift. 
The reasons? 
Af*J! wJh° .«£$> STYLE— new IDEAS in design 

'4L T" — a new conception of how the 

wonders of radio should be physi- 
cally groomed — a new appeal in the dealer's windows — new 
advertising and selling features — these are the dynamic 
forces working for Emerson distributors and dealers. 

You see them eloquently expressed in the new "DUO- 
TONE" models. Here are beauty and harmony — identical 
grille design in front and rear of the cabinet — which are 





Radio 



IN YOUR HOME" 



not only startling, but also enormously appealing. Looked 
at from any angle, they are adaptable to any "placing" in 
the simplest as well as the most luxurious decorative ap- 
pointments. 

You find this high conception of STYLE in ALL 
Emerson models — in the matched, hand-rubbed woods — 
in the craftsmanlike construction — in the soft blending 
of highlights and shades of finish which give them the 
rich character of museum pieces. 

Of course, Emerson "Harmonized Unit" Radio is 
TECHNICALLY right. Its sensitivity, selectivity, TONE 
and many other features are far ahead of ordinary radio 
standards. But it is STYLE which distinguishes Emerson 
most in the buyers' minds — and STYLE has proved to be 
one of the most potent factors in modern merchandising! 



19 Great Models — $1 7.95 to $129.95 • Send Now for Proposition 

EMERSON RADIO & PHONOGRAPH CORPORATION, 111 Eighth Avenue, New York, N. y. 
The EMERSON Line Also Comprises Models for Every Foreign Market ■ Cable Address: EMPHONOCO, N. V. 

Radio Today, published monthly by Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexington Avenue, New York City. 

Subscriptions yearly, $1 in U. S.; $2 in Canada and foreign countries. Special charter subscription, U. S. 

only, good for a limited time — 14 Months $1. Copyright 1935 by Caldwell-Clements, Inc. 



RADIO 



with NEW METAL TUBES 
and CONTROL- ROOM RECEPTION 



**.. 



. 



- 



T , 9tb e popular Model 3- ls tn at 

Kent sales, a^ert a ^ tyowrmon ey 

tUreM :ney^ DsUne ' 

of a money jB ^-r»*'^ 

iiniiim 



THE ATWATER KENT RADIO HOUR SELLS SETS FOR YOU 

on Thursday evenings at 8:30 E.S.T. Columbia Coast-to-Coast Network 



Radio Today 



©C1B 



282174 



Staff— 

Darrell Bartee 
Franklin S. Irby 
Randall R. Irwin 
G. H. Mayorga 
M. H. Newton 
J. E. Osmun 
John F. Rider 
B. V. Spinetta 
Vinton K. Ulrich 



Lee Robinson 

Sales Manager 



RADIO 
TODAY 



Orestes H. Caldwell 
Editor 



M. Clements 
Publisher 

480 Lexington Ave. 

New York City 
Tel. PLaza 3-1340 

Vol. I, No. 3 



Business at neiv peak 

* Sharp pick-up in gen- 
eral business has landed the basic in- 
dex at a hearty 91, highest figure 
since Summer, 1933. A year ago the 
figure was a feeble 75; the current 
upswing is noted in all six major in- 
dustrial activities as against the do- 
ings last year at this time. Most 
notable gain was in electrical power 
output and the National Industrial 
Conference Board reports that this 
figure is the highest on record, in- 
cluding the boom days of December, 
1929. 



Employment, earnings, up 

Most recent figure puts the number 
of unemployed at 9,466,000, compared 
with 10,393,000 at this time last year; 
the number out of work has been 
cut by almost a million. 

Auto production now s.t a n d s at 
more than twice what it was last 
year at this time, and stimulated by 
the national show, predictions are 
that production for the coming sea- 
son will reach 4,000,000 cars. Steel- 
mill activity is well over twice what 
it was last year. 



Means radio buying 

Dope on retail trade, as reflected 
by latest total of department-store 
sales, has increased by slightly more 
than the usual seasonal proportion. 

Average hourly earnings are up, 
all over the country, indicating new 
spending reserves for the purchases 
of Xmas radio sets. Weekly earnings 
have risen from $19.55 a year ago, 
to $22.59 at the present time. Con- 
sidering slightly increased living 
costs, increase in purchasing power 
is still 12 per cent ahead of a year 
ago — significant news for the radio 
dealer ! 



Broadcast billings 

* Gentle decline was ex- 
pected in gross time sales by the 
broadcasters this month, since the 
totals for the season openers were 
recorded earlier this Fall. NBC's fig- 
ure for November, it is estimated, 
will continue to linger around the 
$3,000,000 mark, 11 per cent above the 
total for November '34 which was 
$2,683,494. CBS could scarcely be ex- 
pected to equal its October figure, 
which was a new monthly high for 
the web, and its estimate for No- 
vember is $1,704,000 as against $1,- 
682,959 for the same month last year. 
Eleven-month totals run 19 per cent 
ahead of '34. 

Cumulative estimate so far this 
year, for all gross time sales on na- 
tional nets, regional webs, national 
non-networks and local has reached 
$82,494,000, which is well above the 
same figure for 1934. 

Which all helps sell radio sets ! 



Radio sets boom 

* In spite of unseason- 
able weather and spotty retail sales, 
spirited reports arrive from various 
directions that radio-set production 
and distribution is running 40 per 
cent or more ahead of last year. 

Philco, adding 2,000 employes, has 
built up a factory payroll of 10,000, 
reporting daily outputs reaching 7,000 
sets. Camden headquarters, RCA- 
Victor, for October, 1935, ran 146 per 
cent of October, 1934, and 187 per 
cent of September, 1935. From Chi- 
cago come such encouraging messages 
as "With the peak season half gone, 
our production figures already exceed 
totals of previous years." Another 
files the exceptional report "Our busi- 
ness is up 125 per cent over last year." 

Conservative Dun & Bradstreet, 
Inc., becoming bullish on radio, com- 
ments that leading set-makers have 
made plans to expand production by 
60 to 100 per cent next year. 




November, 1935 



5,000,000 sets in 
'35 — Geddes 

* Bond Geddes, executive 
vice-president of the Radio Manu- 
facturers Association, headquarters 
American Building, Washington, 
D. C, called at Radio Today's offices 
with an encouraging picture of radio's 
present prosperity. 

"From the way the market has been 
going and with the best sales months 
still ahead, at least 5,000,000 radios 
will have been sold by the end of the 
year. This includes automobile radios 
and battery sets. Last year 3,300,000 
radios and 780,000 automobile receiv- 
ers were sold for a total of about 
$235,000,000. This year the market 
is at least double for automobile 
radios, and we expect the gross for 
all types of radios will run close to 
$350,000,000." 

Mr. Geddes attributes the boom to 
better purchasing power among labor 
and farm elements, particularly the 
latter, who are buying battery sets in 
greater volume than ever. Added to 
that, he said, is the desire among set 
owners to replace their old sets with 
the newer all-wave models. Federal 
money pouring into the farm regions 
is very largely responsible for the 
heightened market for farm radios. 

Labor conditions are extremely 
satisfactory, workers are well paid, 
and no labor troubles are in sight, 
the manufacturers report. 



?Veii; amplification-principle 

+ Engineers examined 
with interest the impact or secondary- 
emission amplifying tube demon- 
strated at New York, Oct. 23, by Dr. 
Y. K. Zworykin of television-icono- 
scope fame. In a single glass enve- 
lope, amplifications of half a million 
or more can be obtained, all with a 
minimum of tube noise. 

Starting with the impact of a sin- 
gle electron, the inventor arranges 
this to set free other electrons, which 
in turn carom against plates setting 
off increasing numbers of electrons, 
until prodigious amplifications result, 
all in the same tube. 

While the device, developed in the 
Camden laboratories, has so far been 
applied chiefly to television, some 
outside engineers who have seen it 
declare it has wide and revolutionary 
possibilities for radio and general 
use, and predict commercial utiliza- 
tion within the next two or three 
years, replacing present thermionic- 
tube amplification. 



Wire broadcasts to cafes 

* Vivid voice descrip- 
tions of major sports activities are 
now being presented to the New York 
public through a new wire service 
called Teleflash. The service dis- 
tributed over telephone lines, is leased 
to taverns, hotels, smokeshops, and 
the like. 





Senator William Marconi with Mrs. Marconi, returns from a visit to South 
America, to aid the radio service of the Italian Army using his new micro-waves. 



Dr. Zworykin and his new "electron- 
impact" amplifying tube. 

In addition to sportcasts, news 
items of national interest will be in- 
cluded and musical interludes will 
be used as fillers. At present, broad- 
casts are furnished from 10 :30 a.m. 
until 10 :30 p.m., but with evening 
sports such as hockey in season, the 
latter hour is extended. 

Telephone lines and equipment, 
including amplifiers, are used. In 
order to insure a reasonable degree 
of fidelity, specially balanced lines 
are employed with a loudspeaker and 
amplifier having an output of 1J^ 
watts, additional units being em- 
ployed for greater output. Advertis- 
ing flashes are accepted to help de- 
fray the cost of programs. Single 
store service is provided at $15 a 
month per unit. 



Mark Dec. 2 for your 
share of $300,000,000 

* Thrifty persons 
throughout the United States will 
have saved by Dec. 2 an impressive 
$300,000,000 and over through the 
Christmas clubs, for holiday spending. 
On that date the funds will be re- 
leased by the depository banks in 
every city and town the country over, 
and the fun begins. 

With 1936 radio models displayed 
as the most stunning gift possible, 
radio dealers should come in for a 
neat share of this $300,000,000. 



Radio Today 



California sees sales double 

* Radio sales this season 
are expected by distributors and deal- 
ers in Southern California to double 
those of a year ago. 

Public interest in all-wave is re- 
sulting in definite increase in sales. 
Expect this winter to reach the high- 
est peak of years. Helpful influence 
is the new spending idea that is be- 
ginning to be felt in all lines of mer- 
chandise. F.H.A. loans, while not 
available for radio purchases, are def- 
initely stimulating buying. 

Another primary factor is improved 
tone quality of standard sets. It is 
pointed out that nearly every family 
in Southern California has from one 
to four radios. At least three-fourths 
of these are sadly out-of-date. Dissat- 
isfaction with these old sets is being 
created by inferior performance and 
tone quality as well as growing need 
of service. 

Replacement Sets Better Quality 

Replacement sets, of necessity, 
must be superior to the deluge of 
cheap sets that flooded the Southern 
California market for several years. 
Dealers who sold little but cheap mer- 
chandise a year or two ago are today 
selling only sets priced above $50. 

Catering principally to the low- 
priced field, local manufacturers have 
supplied the majority of sets sold in 
this territory during the last few 
years. Bulk of local products, how- 
ever, has been manufactured for ex- 
port. Regardless of local trends, it is 
probable that the Southern California 
manufacturers will continue to enjoy 
a good export business. 

Press ivants air censorship 

* Extraordinary tangle 
into which publishers have worked 
themselves over the matter of the 
broadcasting of news becomes further 
involved now that the Inland Daily 
Press Association urges the FCC to 
keep radio advertisers from man- 
handling news flashes. Its conven- 
tion resolution said that news should 
be broadcast only as an unsponsored 
editorial service. 

President Noyes of the DDPA has 
the notion that news broadcasts are 
not now "plainly marked advertis- 
ing." Spectacle of Publisher Noyes 
crusading in this direction is curious, 
considering what advertisers get away 
with in IDPA member sheets, by 
buying ad space. Also, he's getting 
very noble about the purification of 




Commander Gene MacDonald of 

Zenith plows the "unsalted seas" on 

his yacht "Mizpah." 

a medium which according to other 
groups of publishers is reaching no- 
body, anyway. 

While the IDPA were brooding 
over this, their neighbor publishers 



were addressing, in convention 

speeches elsewhere, the Newspaper 
Advertising Executives Association, 
saying : "The public appetite for news 
is whetted by the radio flashes and 
circulation rises as a result . . . radio 
opens the door for the newspaper 
salesman." 

Europe's "long ivaves" 

* Travellers starting 
abroad frequently ask American radio 
men what kilocycle range in receiving 
sets is required to hear broadcasts on 
other continents. 

All countries and continents use 
the "standard broadcast band" same 
as U. S. and North America — 550 kc. 
to 1500 or 1600 kc. 

In addition, European stations use 
the "long waves." One important Eu- 
ropean long-wave broadcast band runs 
from 155 kc. to 280 kc. Then there 
is a gap, and broadcast assignments 
begin again at 355 kc. and continue 
on into the standard broadcast band. 
Some of the most important European 
stations operate on these long-wave 
assignments. With the crowded con- 
dition of the European channels, these 
long-wave assignments seem a fixed 
part of the European broadcasting 
picture, according to NBC's C. W. 
Horn. 

Eor use in isolated countries where 
local broadcasting is not dependable, 
short-wave listening should be pro- 
vided for down to the "international 
broadcast" bands at 11 and 13 meters. 




Facsimile marches on! Weather Bureau chiefs inspect new transmitter for 
sending weather-maps and tabloid newspapers to ships at sea. 



November, 1935 



St. Louis ordinance would 
exclude auto radios 

* No radio set may be 
operated in any automobile in the 
city of St. Louis, if an ordinance in- 
troduced before the St. Louis Board 
of Aldermen, Nov. 8, is enacted. The 
proposed ordinance has the support of 
Major Lambert of the Police Com- 
mission. Local radio and automotive 
interests are vigorously opposing the 
measure and have called for a public 
hearing, pointing out that tests have 
shown auto radio to be a positive 
safety factor in keeping drivers alert 
and awake. No city or state has yet 
passed any measure banning auto- 
radio. 

Can they drive and listen? 

* Question of whether 
drivers may safely listen to broad- 
casted torch songs while they do 50 
miles per on an improved highway, 
has for some time worried law- 
makers, as well as dealers in auto 
radio sets. The National Safety 
Council, headed by the able W. H. 
Cameron, has had long discussions 
but has not made a survey. The 
question is very serious to operators 
of big strings of commercial motor 
vehicles, who would like to check up 
on whether radio voices will sing 
their drivers to sleep, or keep them 
awake. The argument has also added 
gray hairs to the heads of radio sales- 
men who daily approach ordinary 
car owners on the subject. 

Eesearch men of General Motors, 





Virgil Graham, indefatigable leader 

of RMA standardization, has joined 

the Hygrade-Sylvania staff at 

Emporium, Pa. 



operating out of Detroit, recently 
worked up the final answer to the 
question of whether radio programs 
are a genuine distraction, in a dan- 
gerous way, to car drivers. The data 
gathered from 2 million questionaires 
definitely revealed the program-lis- 
teners as driving slowly and safely. 
The survey became a powerful argu- 
ment for the use of radio sets in 
cars. 

The GM investigators found young 
drivers mostly wanting radio sets in 
their cars, more so than adult drivers 
— and the young set reported that 
radio music positively did not inspire 
high speeds. Nothing in their re- 
plies indicated that they could not 
drive and listen at the same time, 
safely and successfully. 



"Jail House Follies" 

* Broadcast each Mon- 
day by WJAY from the Cuyahoga 
County Jail in Cleveland, the "Jail 
House Follies" while becoming one 
of the station's most popular pro- 
grams, is having its ups and downs. 
Talent on the show is furnished from 
the ranks of the prisoners and each 
week approximately 400 inmates 
gather in the jail chapel to watch 
the show. 

Recently one of the judges sat in 
during a performance and one of the 
prisoners sang "Just One More 
Chance". The following week two of 
the regular entertainers were given a 
break when they appeared in court ; 
another was not so lucky. He drew 
a three-year term. The unlucky man, 
by the way, is the one who drew tears 
to the eyes of General Pershing at 
the dedication of the unknown sol- 
diers' graves at London and Paris 
when as representative of the TJ. S. 
Army he blew taps. This man, an 
exceptional musician, was formerly 
assistant director of the U. S. Mili- 
tary Academy band at West Point 
and trumpet soloist with Vincent 
Lopez. 



9-meter broadcasts for N. Y. 

* An ultra - high - fre- 
quency transmitter to operate on 9yi 
meters and carry the regular WABC 
program, is being erected on the roof 
of the Columbia Broadcasting build- 
ing, 485 Madison Avenue, New York 
City. This 50-watt unit will be used 
for experimental purposes, to investi- 
gate the geographic range of these 
very short waves for carrying high- 
fidelity programs. The region around 
%Yi meters is clear of noise and in- 




Ben Abrams, president Emerson 

Radio, and chairman membership 

committee RMA, celebrates 20 years 

in radio this month. 



terferenee, except for automobile igni- 
tion, and is viewed as a possible 
broadcasting development. Already 
similar ultra-high-frequency broad- 
casts are being carried on at Buffalo 
and Rochester, and recently news- 
papers unable to get broadcast sta- 
tions in the regular broadcast band, 
have turned longing eyes on the 7-9- 
meter field. 

E. K. Cohan, CBS technical direc- 
tor, expects his new roof-top station 
to cover well beyond the visible hori- 
zon, reaching a metropolitan concen- 
tration of population numbering 
many millions. 

September and last month's Radio 
Today listed six manufacturers pro- 
ducing sets reaching down to 31,600 
kc. (9J4 meters) and beyond: Espey 
5181; Garod 512, 514, 520; General 
Electric A-25 ; Patterson PR16 ; RCA- 
Victor C13-2, C15-3, D22-1, and 
Zenith "Stratosphere." 



122 broadcast stations 
owned by newspapers 

* Queer angle to press- 
radio "war" is large number of broad- 
casting stations (some among the. 
most powerful) owned by newspaper 
interests. Broadcasting estimates that 
122 radio stations in the United 
States are newspaper-controlled. That 
is about 20% of the total of 600; 27 
other newspapers are seeking licenses. 



Radio Today 



Scripps- Howard buying 
radio stations 

* The Scripps - Howard 
newspaper chain, which operates 
papers in 24 cities, has obtained ap- 
proval of the Federal Communica- 
tions Commission for the purchase of 
WFBE, Cincinnati. 

Karl A. Bickel, who heads the Con- 
tinental Radio Company, the Scripps- 
Howard radio subsidiary, said : 

"Scripps-Howard's purchase of the 
Cincinnati station most emphatically 
does not mean that we are planning 
any extensive investment in the 
broadcasting industry. It does not 
mean that Scripps-Howard is consid- 
ering a station in each of the 24 
Scripps-Howard cities. It does not 
mean that Scripps-Howard is plan- 
ning a transcontinental radio chain 
system of its own. 

"It does mean that we feel that 
there are possibilities in radio for the 
development of a closer and more in- 
timate contact between the readers of 
Scripps-Howard newspapers and the 
men and women who produce the 
papers. We feel that we should give 
these possibilities careful study, and 
hope that we may find ways and 
means of increasing the effectiveness 
and value of both of these great in- 
struments for social advancement." 

Applications are filed to construct 
100-watt stations at Columbus and 
Todelo and to change the call letters 
of the Cincinnati station to WCPO. 



Radio creates new 
living standards 

* That broadcasting is 
creating new standards of living for 
the American public, which eventu- 
ally will be expressed in new levels 
of industrial production, was empha- 
sized by Col. Richard C. Patterson, 
Jr., executive vice-president of the 
National Broadcasting Company, ad- 
dressing the Boston Conference on 
Distribution, Colonel Patterson said, 
in part : 

"Two facts about radio cannot be 
denied. First, there is a continued 
and steady increase in the number of 
good things available in the average 
day's span of broadcasting. And sec- 
ond, the public demand for quality 
programs is likewise steadily on the 
increase. 

"You find on the air the best music 
from the best artists; the best drama 
with the best actors; the most press- 
ing problems with the most renowned 
authorities to discuss them. And the 
mail that high-class programs of this 
sort call forth is best proof of the 
fact that America's radio taste is im- 
proving, along with the quality of 
America's radio programs. 

Cultural Job 
"That, I think, is a cultural 
achievement. But it is also a busi- 
ness achievement. We in radio have 
helped to broaden and cultivate the 
desires of the American people. It 
follows from that that we have helped 
to broaden and cultivate the demand 





Television of full movie-screen size and brightness is now being shown on 
Kurfurstendamm, in Berlin. Ten thousand thin-filament lamps make up the 
picture which measures 6yi ft- square, with 100 lines of 100 lamps each. 



Dick Patterson, general manager 
NBC, with 0. B. Hanson, chief 
engineer and wizard of the networks. 

for those things which make the grat- 
ification of those desires a possibility. 
"And it is a significant fact that 
so many of these contributions have 
been made under commercial sponsor- 
ship. Business, which has been iden- 
tified with the production of goods, 
has now become identified with pro- 
viding the good things of life. Busi- 
ness produces the equipment with 
which to enjoy life. And then busi- 
ness turns around and helps to pro- 
vide the enjoyment. Quite apart 
from the economic implications, I 
doubt if there was ever a time when 
industry could so well afford to have 
a hand in making that kind of a non- 
material contribution to our national 
well-being." 



Export sets without tubes, 
non-infringing 

* Radio sets for export 
in which the tubes are inserted into 
their sockets by recipients abroad, so 
that patented operating circuits are 
not completed while within the juris- 
diction of the United States, are de- 
clared not infringements of U. S. 
patents and so not required to pay 
license fees, according to decision of 
the Circuit Court of Appeals in the 
case of F. A. D. Andrae, defendant 
in a suit brought by RCA and 
AT & T. 

The decision is declared to affect 
a number of export manufacturers 
and reverses an injunction granted 
the plaintiffs by Federal Judge Inch 
in Brooklyn several months ago. 



November, 1935 



RACKETS THAT ARE HURTING RADIO 

Dummy tubes, gyp merchandise/ and shady 
practises compete for purchases of unwary public 



* UNDER the cover of pros- 
perity, rackets spring up. Radio is 
no exception. 

While the radio trade as a whole 
has been busy meeting the recent 
1935 sales rush, outsiders, muscling 
in, have looked upon unsophisticated 
radio buyers as fair prey. Taking 
advantage of trade situations and 
changes in the radio art, these re- 
sourceful gyps have developed new 
ingenuities to fleece the public. 

Against radio's racketeers the pub- 
lic and the radio trade must be 
warned. More and more, legitimate 
radio dealers are being faced with 
this competition in one form or an- 
other. The innocent layman natu- 
rally wonders why he is asked to pay 
the legitimate scale of prices at his 
neighborhood store, when "six-tube 
superheterodynes" are being adver- 
tised on gyp row "complete at $4.85." 

Stamp out evils 

So the editors of Radio Today feel 
they are rendering a needed service 
to all of radio by outlining some of 
the rackets now prevalent in certain 



quarters. Spreading an understand- 
ing of these gyp practices is the 
surest way to meet such competition 
and to stamp it out! 

Rackets now current in radio cover 
a wide range of merchandising mis- 
demeanors. They involve swindles in 
radio products and servicing. Re- 
ceivers and tubes are subjects of 
grossly misleading claims; trade 
names are counterfeited. Sharp tricks 
are practiced on store customers. 
And all of these react on the whole 
radio industry. 

For example, "seven-tube" radio 
sets are advertised at bargain prices. 
But on examination it is found that 
one or two of the tubes in these sets 
are not even connected, and have no 
part in the set's operation. 

Counterfeit tubes 

One receiver found on the cut- 
price market this year, employs as a 
selling feature, one metal tube (ap- 
parently added as an afterthought). 
This metal tube has eight prongs, 
but in the socket only two of these 
prongs are wired up. Inside the tube 
a concealed jumper wire connects 



LET THE PUBLIC KNOW THE RISK IT RUNS 

when dealing with gyp .sellers. Only in 
this way can present evils be stamped out. 

Here are some of the 1935 rackets: 

Dummy tubes are added to sets, to swell number 
Resistors, condensers, etc., are counted as "the new metal 

tubes" 
Salesmen deliberately wreck sets before wrapping, to get 

customers back for sell-up game 
Leading trade-names are counterfeited 
Standard sets are combined with gyp components 
Static "eliminators" coin money for curb-side demonstrators 
Tubes are switched; inferior grades substituted 
"Short-wave" claims made for standard BC receivers 



these two prongs together. Obviously 
the tube is a dummy, put there only 
to mislead the unwary. 

The new metal tubes make it more 
difficult than ever to detect decep- 
tions of this kind, since the operation 
of the tube filament cannot be seen, 
although after a few minutes its 
heating can be felt. 

Recent practice in mounting re- 
sistors, ballasts, coils, and other com- 
ponents of receivers, on standard 
bases, so that they can be plugged in 
or out, like tubes, has led irrespon- 
sible merchandisers to cite these 
metal containers as "the new metal 
tubes," to unsuspecting purchasers. 
In this way, by adding up all the 
metal-jacketed cylinders in sight on 
the chassis, the unscrupulous mer- 
chandiser can make an impressive 
total for "the number of tubes" in 
the set he is selling. 

Strong-arm stuff 

Gyp stores have a strong-arm 
''sell-up" technique. Here is the way 
it works. 

Window displays, for instance, 
offer what is apparently a very at- 
tractive set at $8.95. But try and 
get it. If the customer nibbles at 
this price bait and walks into the 
store, he is immediately given a stiff 
sales talk about another set at $15, 
then $25 — and so is led up a rising 
price spiral. 

If, however, the customer still in- 
sists that he wants the $8.95 set he 
came in for, and the clerk finally sees 
no ' alternative, the set demanded is 
tested by playing it in the customer's 
presence and is then taken to be 
wrapped. During the wrapping proc- 
ess, the clerk reaching inside, by a 
deft jerk breaks one or two wires; 
then the wrapping is completed and 
the package handed to the buyer. 

When he gets home, the set of 
course will not work. Traipsing 
back to the store, he is met with the 
bland front : "Well, as you know, 
Mister, it worked here all right. Tou 
heard us test it. Tou must have done 
something to burn it out. We'll send 



8 



Radio Today 



it to our repair man to be cheeked 
up." 

In a few minutes the $8.95 set 
comes back with a report that it will 
cost $8 to make the necessary re- 
pairs. And obligingly the salesman 
suggests the alternative set at $15, 
which he proposed in the first place, 
with credit for all or part of the 
amount already paid. Usually at 
this point the victim is ready to com- 
plete the $15 purchase. 

Fake trade names 

Names of leading brands are simu- 
lated by hyphenating them with 
qualifying adjectives, to make the 
purchaser think he is getting a stand- 
ard set. 

Standard sets are also obtained 
from legitimate sources and broken 
up, and the cabinet, chassis and 
speaker are then separately combined 
with "loft-made" parts. In this way 
the unprincipled seller has three com- 
plete sets on each of which he can 
point out a genuine trade-marked 
component, intimating that each 
whole set is a genuine factory-assem- 
bled job. 

Street-hawkers are gypping the 
public with "static eliminators" and 
interference removers. Most of these 
highly-colored containers are filled 
only with sand, and their attach- 
ments are useless. They are demon- 
strated, however, on curb-side autos 
with the aid of an ingenious tension 
switch, which automatically intro- 
duces fearful interference when the 
"eliminator" is out of circuit, but 
wipes the circuit clear of noise when 
the eliminator gadget is inserted in 
the antenna. 




'How about 50 and FIVE 10's on 
tubes?" 



Advertising trickery 

Mis-illustration of models in ad- 
vertising is another trick in use by 
unprincipled dealers. Ads showing a 
deluxe console will also carry a fea- 
tured price which appears to be a 
sensational value, but hidden away 
in a corner of the ad will be the 
small-type statement that "the model 
illustrated is No. 243." Investiga- 
tion reveals that Model No. 243 is 
priced a great deal higher than the 
figure featured in the ad. 

Many small sets are being sold as 
"short-wave" and "all-wave" receivers 
and casual inspection by non-expert 
customers would indicate that the sets 



are actually wired for short-wave re- 
ception. But when they are pur- 
chased and hooked up, they turn out 
to be only ordinary broadcast re- 
ceivers. In such cases a genuine 
short-wave set is used for demonstra- 
tion purposes. 

Cut-throat shops have even gone 
so far as to obtain metal shields which 
they buy or can make themselves 
and which can be fitted around an 
ordinary glass tube of inferior design, 
so that the tubes can be represented 
as metal ones. All manner of wild 
excuses are used to explain to the 
customer when the tube is not marked 
with the name of a manufacturer. 

Costs radio good-will 

And so the list of radio rackets 
might be extended almost indefinitely. 
This gypping of the public by irre- 
sponsible radio men, works a double 
evil. It is costing the public its 
hard-earned dollars. And when the 
victims wake up to the realization 
that they have been imposed on, it 
costs the good-will of the public to- 
ward the radio industry. All along 
the line — broadcasters, manufactur- 
ers, dealers — everybody suffers. Ex- 
cept the radio racketeer who mo- 
mentarily benefits from the profits of 
his swindle. 

So — every radio man who has the 
well-being of radio at heart, needs to 
be on the look-out for such rackets. 
Only by making their existence and 
menace generally known to the 
public — by forewarning prospective 
radio purchasers — can the evil be 
stamped out and the racketeers 
curbed. 




November, 1935 



FROM NOW TILL CHRISTMAS 

Some practical reminders for the radio 
dealer, from a big-league radio merchandiser 



By H. L. M. CAPRON* 

* GIVEN appropriate and con- 
sistently aggressive merchandising, 
this year should make radio sales his- 
tory. This month and the next two 
months of December and January will 
normally account for some 46 per cent 
of your year's business. 

Manufacturers have their new lines 
in production. 

Dealers have selected the lines they 
will sell. 

Consumer advertising campaigns 
have started. 

The time for planning and think- 
ing is past. 
'The time for ACTION is here. 

In most sections of the country the 
radio market saturation is so great 
that our primary selling efforts must 
be given to the replacement market, 
with compacts and small table models 
definitely relegated to the "personal" 
and second set category. 

This may require a different selling 
technique than you have used in the 
past; do not let tradition bind you too 
long or too tight to the old market. 

The passing of the "original set" 
market, and the growth of replace- 
ment sales, place a new importance on 
customer goodwill — place a new 
value on your Service Division, and 
the satisfaction it must GUARAN- 
TEE — give you the best possible an- 
swer to cut-price competition. 

Sales from service 

The first large source of new busi- 
ness may well come from the work 
and the records of the Service Divi- 
sion. 

Go back over the sales and service 
records of the past several years. Get 
in touch with these people, by per- 
sonal call, by phone, or by personal 
letter. Tell them about a new radio, 
and offer, for a very nominal sum, to 
give their present radio a thorough 
overhaul in your shop. Loan them a 
new set and see that it is installed 
with a good lead-in antenna. The 
appearance, the tone, the foreign re- 
ception of the new radio will cer- 



tainly make the old one seem even 
poorer than it is, and this demonstra- 
tion will be far more effective than 
any sales talk. 

Up-to-date windows 

A series of window displays cal- 
culated to drive home the fact that 
the old radio is obsolete can be built 
around the comparisons of well known 
obsolete and modern things. 

In each of the following windows 
(which can be done in miniature or 
with photos) an early electric radio 
should be compared with a 1936 
model, preferably of the same make. 

1. A wood-burning locomotive and 
train, with a streamliner. 

2. An old horse and buggy with a 
modern automobile. 

3. The Pony Express with a mod- 
ern motor truck. 

4. A covered wagon with the modern 
air-liner. 

5. A sailing ship with the Nor- 
mandie. 

6. A tallow candle with a modern in- 
direct floor lamp. 

7. Women's dress and hat styles of a 
decade ago with the new fall styles. 

8. A bathing beauty of 1900 with the 
1935 girl. 

"Hear the whole shoiv" 

Displays dealing directly with the 
technical superiority of the new sets 
are also excellent attention-getters, 
particularly so when motion, chang- 



*For the past 14 years manager of 
one of the largest retail radio busi- 
nesses in the world. 



— 1936 models offer more 
chances Jor Xmas selling 

— best windows accent 
latest set features 

— but wise dealers won't 
depend on them alone 

— leads a-plenty in local 
news columns 

— repetition in ads makes 
reputation 

— the real friend-making 
devices pay dividends 



ing color, changing light, or an ele- 
ment of mystery are involved. 

One example of this type of dis- 
play follows : 

A large photo of an orchestra, of 
such size as to fill the entire back 
of the window, and so arranged that 
a segment can be made invisible, 
through special painting and lighting 
or shadow-box lighting. 

A radio of the vintage of 1928, and 
a 1936 model, preferably of the same 
manufacture. 

Three simple signs. 

Over the orchestra — "$2,000,000 
WEEKLY EOE EADIO BROAD- 
CASTS . . HOW MUCH DOES 
YOUR RADIO LOSE"? 

Before the old set, "THIS RADIO 
RECEIVES ONLY PART OF THE 
MUSIC." 

Before the new set, "THIS RADIO 
RECEIVES THE WHOLE OR- 
CHESTRA." Arrange the lighting 
so that the sign on the old set is vis- 
ible only when a part of the orchestra 
is invisible. 

Getting leads 

Wise dealers don't depend on win- 
dow displays alone to bring in pros- 
pects. 

Offer your old customers a com- 
mission of 5 per cent, or a year's free 
service, for every sale that is com- 
pleted with a prospect of their ref- 
erence. Plenty of leads, already half 
sold, will result; also follow the wed- 
ding and birth announcements in 
your local paper, and to every one 
send an appropriate engraved card of 
congratulations. File these names by 
dates, and each year send an appro- 
priate anniversary, or birthday greet- 
ing card, a few days before the ac- 
tual date. You will be surprised at 
the friends you will make this way, 
and friends make customers. 

And there lies the very backbone 
of any long range merchandising or 
business development. 

When the novelty has become the 
staple, when the spectacular and pred- 
atory price cutting has given way to 
stability, when necessity has replaced 
the luxury item, when storekeepers 
have become merchants, then friends, 



10 



Radio Today 



good-will, customers become the great- 
est asset that any business can have. 
With these thoughts in mind, there 
will occur to you dozens of things 
that you can do to make friends. The 
things you would like to have others 
do to and for you are the things to 
do for others. Think of them, then 
do them. They all pay dividends. 

Make friends 

Sales promotion is making cus- 
tomers. 

Making friends is sales promotion. 

You cannot forget that there are 
other years coming, and next year you 
will have to beat 1935. Our industry 
is very definitely settling down, and 
the future will find it governed by 
the same principles as are all other 
businesses. 

In preparing for future years I 
know of no better method than always 
satisfying the customer. 

Do not try to measure the effective- 
ness of everything you do by the im- 
mediate sales response, for you are 
dealing now with a virtual necessity, 
and in a long-range replacement 
market. Your primary purpose now 
is to keep the business coming, and 
keep making friends. You may be 
sure that every owner of a radio will 
sooner or later buy a new one. Try 
then to keep your name very favor- 
ably before all the people, so that 
when they do decide to buy a new 
radio, they will subconsciously think 
of you first. 

The importance of this policy is 
much greater than is first apparent. 
Long-range psychology has a powerful 
sales impact. 

Look ahead 

Remember that a customer soon 
forgets what she paid, but long re- 
members what she got. And so make 
every effort to sell the better radio, 
insist upon the best installation you 
can make, and give the very best 
service you are capable of. The cus- 
tomer must be satisfied. Purchasers 
of new radio are going to talk about 
them, and if you give the customer 
something to be proud of and happy 
with you may be sure that others will 
know about it. 

It is probable that your own pre- 
vious sales represent but a small pro- 
portion of the local population, and 
you must therefore go after new cus- 
tomers as well as actively cultivate 
your old ones. 

Newspaper advertising if consist- 
ent, is always good but is apt to be 
too expensive for the small dealer un- 
less carefully planned. Co-ordinated 
advertising and window displays can 




be very effective and within the reach 
of every dealer. 

Repetition does make reputation. 
You can and should use small space 
in every issue of your local paper. 
One column by 40 to 60 lines is suf- 
ficient. 

Try also to arrange with your local 
movies for the use of their sound 
equipment for two or three minutes 
each show. Make an appropriate an- 
nouncement and then put on a for- 
eign program. 

How much for trade-ins 

Since you are now definitely in a 
replacement market, you cannot 
escape the trade-ins which customers 
will invariably want. It is important 
that you work out a policy that is 
sound economically, fair to you, and 
interesting to your customers. A 
concrete suggestion that has produced 
the desired results is this : From the 
original list price of the customer's 
set deduct 40 per cent each year, and 
make the difference between that and 
the original price your allowance; ex- 
cept that the allowance shall be not 
more than 25 per cent of the price of 
the radio purchased, and the allowance 



Photo by Ewituj Galloway 



on a set more than two years old 
about 10 per cent of the original price. 

Sure-fire offer 

And now, just one sure-fire sales 
producer. 

Make a special trade-in offer from 
time to time on just one make of 
radio. Offer 25 per cent for all radios 
of the selected models, FOR TEN 
DAYS ONLY. Pick the very popular 
sets of a few years ago : Majestic, At- 
water Kent, Crosley, Fada, etc., but 
take only one at a time, and make 
your offer at least 10 per cent better 
than your regular trade-in proposi- 
tion. The owners of the selected sets 
will feel they have been singled out 
for an especial proposition. 

If you have any particular condi- 
tion or problem in merchandising or 
operation, send as much information 
as you can to Radio Today, and your 
problems will be answered to the best 
of our ability from many years' prac- 
tical and successful experience. 

Tell us, too, how you have licked 
the conditions that have faced you, 
so that, as a clearing house, we may 
pass the practical information along 
to someone else who needs your help. 



November, 1935 



11 



RECEIVERS TODAY 

Automobile radio offers additional 
profits to dealer and serviceman 



* NEW YORK auto show, just 
closed, indicated that interest in 
the new car models is greater than 
at any time since 1929. And this 
soaring interest is in the more ex- 
pensive cars, definitely showing that 
the public has more money to spend. 
Automotive radio this year therefore 
offers excellent profit possibilities for 
both the dealer and the serviceman. 

Eecognizing the demand for auto 
radios the automotive manufacturers 
have designed all cars for receiver 
installations. Every American manu- 
facturer has made provision in some 
manner for the use of a radio in his 
auto.* The radio controls are mounted 
on the instrument panel and appear 
to be an integral part of the original 
layout. Built-in antennas are fea- 
tured on closed cars not having turret 
top construction. Mounting holes 
are drilled so that the recommended 
receiver may be installed in the least 
possible time. Provision for employ- 
ing header-type speakers is found on 
most cars. 

Service opportunity- 
la an effort to make more profit 
for their dealers, the manufacturers 
are strongly advocating that all dem- 
onstration cars be equipped with 

'Information on the radio equipment 
and antenna facilities of the 1936 autos 
is given on pape 34. 



radios, in this way the customer 
hears how the receiver will sound in 
his own car. Since many of the or- 
ganizations leave the installation of 
the set up to either the jobber or the 
dealer, an excellent opportunity to 
make installations exists for the 
local servicemen. By contacting the 
local automotive representatives, the 
wide-awake serviceman should be 
able to contract for installation of 
the sets and thereby add to his in- 
come. The fact that all the auto 
radios employ a vibrator unit indi- 
cates that servicemen will find much 
revenue in replacing these devices as 
they wear out. One successful con- 
tact with an automotive concern will 
lead to many future service and in- 
stallation calls. 

Easy sales 

The radio dealer can obtain re- 
ceivers through his jobber since the 
sets are standard models with the ex- 
ception of the controls and mount- 
ing plate. By cashing in on the 
radio promotional activities of the 
car manufacturers and publicizing 
the availability of custom-built re- 
ceivers for every make car, the re- 
tailer can obtain the business lost by 
the automotive dealer because of his 
lack of radio knowledge and sales- 
manship. 



While the manufacturers supplying 
receivers to the automotive industry 
do not make the sets available to 
radio dealers, there are other reliable 
manufacturers making "duplicate" 
sets as far as appearance is concerned 
and which mount on the instrument 
panel. Where low price is of im- 
portance, the radio dealer can sell 
one of the competitive models which 
has a steering-column or similar type 
of mounting. 

Open cars, no aerial 

In considering the cost of installa- 
tion the dealer should realize that 
none of the open-model cars and con- 
vertible coupes have a built-in an- 
tenna and that there is no way of 
satisfactorily utilizing the header- 
type reproducer. Another important 
fact to be remembered is that a re- 
ceiver designed for use with a run- 
ing board antenna should not be used 
with a roof aerial, for a great loss in 
selectivity will result. 

All the General Motors cars employ 
the "turret top" steel roof which 
makes the use of a running board 
type antenna essential. A number 
of the manufacturers using a steel 
roof have so designed it that the top 
section can be utilized as an aerial, 
by insulating it from the rest of the 
car. Of the popular-priced cars, only 
Ford and Plymouth have open-roof 
construction; a chicken-wire antenna 
is built-in. 

Metal-tube sets rumored 

At the time of publication none of 
the radio manufacturers have an- 
nounced metal tube sets for autos, 
but from current rumors it is likely 










Ft 

i 

1 4 




"|s= 



:&-£ 



* 'ittBV WSSf f5** 





*HJU>: 



In current European sets, the listener tunes directly to the name of the station he desires. In the set at the left, the 

tuning marker moves up and down over the tabulated station names. In the right-hand receiver the marker is moved 

horizontally across the staggered rows of station designations. Note oval speaker for better tone quality. 



12 



Radio Today 



that they will be introduced before 
long. Heralding a step in this direc- 
tion is Raytheon's announcement of 
a metal (shielded) gaseous rectifier 
for automotive use; it is of the fila- 
mentless type, thereby reducing bat- 
tery consumption. The tube operates 
as the result of the ionization of a 
permanent gas and with the low po- 
tential drop of 24 volts; in basic 
principle it is similar to the "B" 
eliminator tube used a few years ago. 
The use of this tube will probably 
decrease the cost of receivers slightly 
because a non-synchronous vibrator 
can be used with a high over-all 
efficiency. 

German radio receivers 

* Circuit practice in 
German radio sets follows closely that 
on this side of the Atlantic. While 
the sets have different features, much 
attention has been paid to adding 
more or less important gadgets, re- 
fining the controls, and improving 
the appearance. In direct contrast to 
American receivers with their many 
tubes, the German sets usually employ 
only three or four tubes. 

Loudspeakers have definitely been 
made better. Permanent-magnet dy- 
namic speakers are proving to be pop- 
ular; a more advanced design pro- 
vides high efficiency and superb per- 
formance. It is reported that mag- 
netic fields used in the air gaps are 
as high as 12,000 gauss. One set uses 
an elliptical shaped cone, for which 
a high fidelity of response is claimed. 

Acoustical tests reveal -that the 
mantel cabinets previously used for 
table models brought about a decrease 
in the quality of reproduction because 
of cavity resonance. This cabinet de- 
sign has been partially replaced by a 
new one, a rather flat and horizontally 
elongated design. The loudspeaker is 
not mounted above the chassis but 
alongside it. The cabinets are ex- 
tremely simple, unnecessary orna- 
ments which catch dust and dirt be- 
ing eliminated. 



Cabinet features 

German cabinet design is not a 
copy of furniture, but represents a 
style created by technical necessities. 
The beauty of the sets lies in the ap- 
plication of wood with varied and 
unusual grain effects. One manufac- 
turer presented a receiver with a cab- 
inet made of a black moulded mate- 
rial; all the fittings and tuning knobs 
were made of an ivory white material. 
The set received much attention from 




A feature of several 1936 receivers is the cathode-ray tuning indicator. Among 
the sets using the device are Pilot, RCA-Victor, and Sparton. 



visitors at the Berlin Radio Show, 
who gave it the nickname, "The man 
in evening dress." 

The tuning dials are made with the 
names of the broadcast stations them- 
selves, and size seems to be of no con- 
cern. The chassis illustrated has one 
of these dials; a hair-line indicator 
which moves vertically shows to what 
station the listener is tuned. Dual- 
speed vernier dials are employed, 
some with a reduction as great as 



150 to 1. Another arrangement is the 
use of a mirror system which projects 
name of the station in large letters 
upon a ground-glass screen. 

One designer has used the telephone 
dial mechanism as a tuning means; 
one has only to dial the station by a 
number and the station is automat- 
ically received. Perfect tuning re- 
sults. A switching arrangement em- 
ploying fixed condensers is the prin- 
ciple of operation. 



TUBES TODAY 



Metal production up 

* Metal-tube production 
is now keeping pace with demand. 
No longer working hand-to-mouth on 
shipments, some of the plants are 
now making deliveries to warehouse 
stocks, so that the replacement-tube 
business is again assuming normal 
aspects. 

Total metal production is running 
at least 160,000 tubes a day, with re- 
jects further under control. One fac- 
tory which increased its output on 
metal tubes to 20,000 a day, actually 
had to cut production in half, to 
10,000 tubes a day. 

Big-gun salvo in the metal-tube 
assault was fired early this month in 
full-page newspaper ads in 67 cities 
throughout the country, listing the 
47 radio set makers who now employ 
metal tubes in receivers which they 
manufacture. 



Glass tube stand 

* Meanwhile the glass- 
tube advocates stand their ground, 
and report that glass-tube sets are 
selling well right through the Fall 
season. Wide publicity on the metal- 
tube issue, they say, has resulted in 
the public's coming into retail stores 
to get first-hand advice from dealers, 
with the result that the customer 
buys the set for which the retailer 
puts up best sales argument. 

Announcement of replacement 
metal tubes under the Philco trade- 
mark caused considerable predictions 
by trade prophets, until the receipt 
of the letter to the trade sent out by 
Larry Gubb, general sales manager of 
Philco Radio & Television Corp., 
specifying that Philco radio sets for 
the spring season of 1936 will be 
equipped only with Philco high- 
efficiency glass tubes. 



November, 1935 



13 



SALES IDEAS THAT WORKED 

Adapt these practical experiences to your Christmas selling 



Missouri bulletin 

■* Jenkins Music Co., 
Kansas City, Mo., reports good re- 
sults on a collection of educational 
records which the company got to- 
gether and sent to the educational 
directors in the area. Such lists oi 
directors are available from school 
officials to any dealer, and the lists of 
appropriate records are forthcoming 
from the manufacturers. 

Baseball players sell radios 

* After the baseball sea- 
son is over, engage some of the play- 
ers to sell radios for you. That is 
the advice from James W. Morgan, 
proprietor of the West End Radio 
Company, Birmingham, Ala., who 
has successfully used this plan for 
the last four years. 

Just as soon as the season is over 
for the Birmingham Barons, local 
team in the Southern League, Mr. 
Morgan offers all the players a job 



selling radios during the off season. 
Usually two to four accept and, since 
they know lots of people and are well 
known themselves, they make good 
salesmen. In this way they are able 
to add to their baseball playing rev- 
enue and Mr. Morgan capitalizes on 
the popularity of baseball to boost his 
radio business. 

Sound-proof booths 
for auto jobs 

* Sound-proof work 
booths are an essential part of the 
facilities which enable the Radio 
Electric Company, Montgomery, Ala., 
to cash in on a large share of the 
automotive radio business in its com- 
munity. 

"We employ five mechanics and as 
long as they all worked in one open 
shop they interfered with each other," 
said G. C. Dickey, manager. "The 
noise and squeaks from the radios 
being repaired was worse than the 



Which of the Boys Will Play 
Saint Nick for You? 




"Yam'* *.aryan 



Here are four boys whose iaces are as well known to 
Birmingham citizens as is old Saint Nick' 3. And Saint 
Nicholas could have no better helpers in making yours 
a golden Christmas! 

Let One of Them Make 
Yours A Golden Christmas 

The -gents above are salesmen at the West End Radio Co., 
Birmingham, Ala., offering their faces for this smart holiday ad. 



din in a dog hospital just before 
feeding time. 

"So we designed the booths, three 
in number, where a mechanic may go 
with a set and work on it, not disturb- 
ing any other workman and not be- 
ing disturbed himself. The booths 
are ventilated, electrically lighted and 
practically soundproof. Each one is 
equipped with most of the tools 
needed for usual radio repair work. 
In each booth is a specially designed 
and built-in panel board where quick 
connections may be made with a tube 
tester, analyzer, oscillator and a volt- 
ohm meter. 

Service folloiv-up 

* When Clark Radio 
Service, Granville, Ohio, finishes a 
servicing job, it has an additional 
gesture which appears to strike the 
proper good-will note, and is so 
downright engaging that the cus- 
tomer has a nice feeling about it all. 

"We take this method to check up 
on the services rendered during the 
past few days. . . . Was everything 
satisfactory and are you pleased with 
the service?" runs the stamped reply 
card sent to the customer a few days 
after Clark's did the servicing. Sim- 
ple, disarming, the card indicates a 
service attitude that customers like. 

Ballyhoo truck 
brings results 

* A sound advertising 
truck has increased business for Bush 
Radio Company of Century, Fla., by 
100 per cent since it was placed in 
service several months ago. W. E. 
Bush, proprietor, handles ballyhoo 
jobs for mercantile concerns as well 
as organizations of various kinds, 
charging $20 a day for his services. 
During political campaigns his truck 
makes the whole state, going any- 
where desired. 

"Methods of advertising in a small 
town are necessarily limited, there 
being no daily newspapers or broad- 
casting stations," said Mr. Bush. "A 
sound truck can do the job more 
quickly and effectively than any other 
medium. We have handled all kinds 
of events with our truck and can 
draw a crowd of 100 people in 10 
minutes, most any day." 



14 



Radio Today 



WHAT SALES ARE PROFITABLE? 




BALANCE AVAILABLE FOR SALESMAN'S 
COMMISSIONS, ADVERTISING, NET PROFIT 



$400 



$250 



$350 



$300 



"FIXED COSTS" INCLUDE 

1. CHECKING CREDIT 

2. COST OF COLLECTION 

3. DELIVERY COST 

4. INSTALLATION 

5. SERVICING 

6. GENERAL OVERHEAD 



■* TO demonstrate to his dealer 
customers what size sale is profitable 
and what unit selling prices barely 
pay their way, Benjamin Gross, of 
Gross Sales, Inc., New York and Bos- 
ton, sales agents for Stromberg-Carl- 
son, has been making use of a chart 
like that shown above. 

For various retail selling prices of 
radio receivers, running from $75 to 
$400, the chart shows the cost of mer- 
chandise, figured at "40 and 10" off 
list : the "fixed costs" of overhead and 
selling, and the remaining amount 
available for salesman's commission, 
advertising, and net profit for the 
dealer. 

In this way there are graphically 
presented the amounts, from transac- 
tions of various size, which are avail- 
able for the various elements entering 
into the dealer's costs and profit. 

"Cost of merchandise," Mr. Gross 
points out, is the amount due the sup- 
plier of the goods, and so must be 
held to be passed on to the manufac- 
turer or distributor. 

"Fixed costs" are itemized above. 



The cost of checking credit on a time- 
payment purchase does not vary with 
the amount involved; in fact, the man 
who is asking to purchase a high- 
priced set is often easier to "get a 
line on" than the man buying a low- 
priced console. Cost of collection is 
also pretty well fixed, and while de- 
pending on the number of months over 
which the installments are to be col- 
lected, is independent of the amount 
collected per month. 



BEN GROSS 

for the past 14 years has been an 
active leader in radio merchandis- 
ing circles, and is well known for 
his effective sales demonstrations 
before dealers. He has won national 
recognition as one of the prime- 
movers of the Radio Wholesalers' 
Association, as chairman of the 
Code Authority for Radio Whole- 
salers and as chairman of the Five- 
Point Plan for radio industry pro- 
motion. 



Delivery cost is little different for 
ah expensive or a cheap console. It 
also costs about as much to install the 
one properly as the other. And to 
service either unit during the contract 
period costs about the same. 

Experience in various stores, col- 
lected by Mr. Gross, indicates that 
these "fixed charges" usually total 
about $35 per console and that this 
loading, as just explained, applies 
eually to all prices of sets, whether $75 
or $400. 

Out of what is left, as shown at the 
right in the chart, therefore, must 
come the amounts required for sales- 
men's commissions, advertising and, 
finally, the dealer's own net profit. 

Mr. Gross uses this chart to demon- 
strate that the profitable and desirable 
sales are those in the upper brackets 
as shown by the chart. On the other 
hand, he points out, sales in the lower 
brackets may be a matter of simply 
"swapping dollars," or may actually 
result in a loss on each transaction- 



November, 1935 



IS 



n 



kk 



MILLION-DOLLAR PROGRAMS 




I Burns and Allen get a staggering sum 
for weekly antics on the air. 



Broadcasters pay thousands for direct hook-ups with 
Ethiopian battle-lines. 





Sport fans are happy, though Baer-Louis bout 
cost sponsor $27,500; World Series $500,000. 



"The O'Neills," popular units of Procter 
Gamble's costly program series. 



* SHOW these pages to your customers, Mr. Eadio 
Dealer. 

Or post them up in your show-window. 

For they will "get across" to customers or passers-by 
just what it is that you are really selling — the means for 
hearing the wonderful programs that are on the air. 




16 



Radio sets are not just items of furniture — not mere 
assemblies of metal and wire. They are outlets for the 
greatest entertainment service ever offered in all the his- 
tory of showmanship. Remember, there's a million dollars' 
worth of entertainment behind every radio dial! 

Tliat's why people buy radios. 

Radio Today 



iaa.i 



GO WITH EVERY SET WE SELL" 





Air favorite Jack 
Benny, said to 
earn himself 
$8,500 for weekly 
cut-ups. 



s £°«sor L Uac Tim* . • ^ 

Victor tr nl 

Cts *e bo 
^J^!!^. ****** «, 




To enlist the powerful selling force of million-dollar 
programs behind your own radio-set sales — put these 
pages where your prospects can see them — in your store, 
on your counter, in your show-window! 

Radio Todat presents these pictures as samples of the 
great programs, costing in all many millions a year, 

November, 1935 



which are behind every sale of every radio set. Use them 
to remind your customers that no radio receiver can be 
too costly to reproduce faithfully the expensive programs 
the broadcasters spread across the night skies. And re- 
mind your customers also that — 

"Million dollar programs go with every set WE sell." 



17 



HIGH FIDELITY ON 1550 KC 

Successful experience of W2XR on 20-kc. channel. 
Commercial programs in the New York area. 



• COMPLAINT has often been 
made that the 10-kilocycle broadcast 
channels set up by the original Fed- 
eral Radio Commission seriously 
bobble high-fidelity musical repro- 
duction by limiting the side-bands to 
5,000 cycles, or about the range of 
the piano keyboard. 

To provide experimental outlets for 
high-fidelity broadcasting, reproduc- 
ing up to 10,000 cycles, the FCC a 
year or so ago established 20-kilocycle 
channels between 1,520 and 1,580 kc. 
One of the high-fidelity stations to be 
licensed on 1,550 kc. was W2XR, New 
York, which has now been operated 
a year under the direction of John 
V. L. Hogan, well known radio 
engineer. 

Increased volume range 

Experience with this station has 
revealed some interesting results. For 
example, tests of W2XR's transmis- 
sions have shown that they give def- 
initely superior quality as compared 
with ordinary broadcasts, regardless 
of the type of receiver employed. An 
improvement over narrow - range 
broadcasting can be noticed on all 



Pimeei'ingiii Wireless 
Pioneering in Urnaihastmg 



■**-» Osietllst tales! 

TRUE FIDELITY 
STATIONW2XR 

Monday to Ep4ay . 

Hech week from ■/ to S p..m. . ... 
JBeginrthig Monday Nigftt,:Sept. i€ 



John Wanamaker New York 



i 

j 



Popular interest in hi-fidelity prompts 

sponsor to make W2XR a regular 

feature. 



model radios, according to a listener 
survey conducted recently in the New 
York area. Obviously, to hear the 
program as it is in the studio, it is 
necessary to use a high-fidelity re- 
ceiver. 

True fidelity broadcasting, which 
means extending the range way down 
as well as up, allows for other im- 
provements in art other than the flat 
frequency response. The dynamic 
range of sounds is greatly increased. 
It is possible to have a volume range 
of some 50 decibels. The average 
usable range in many instances is 
about 35 decibels, as compard to the 
maximum of 20 employed by most 
broadcasting stations. The range of 
volume actually usable in the home 
depends largely upon the noise-to- 
signal level and the output capabili- 
ties of the receiver. 

Low distortion 

A requirement of high fidelity that 
is often overlooked is that of low har- 
monic content or distortion. This ap- 
plies to both the receivers and the 
transmitter. At W2XR the trans- 
mitter has been designed so that less 
than 1 per cent harmonic distortion 
is present at modulation levels up to 
100 per cent, and the audio-frequency 
range is from 20 to 16,000 cycles. 

True fidelity broadcasting has been 
licensed by the Commission on fre- 
quencies of 1,530, 1,550 and 1,570. 
While the ground wave at these fre- 
quencies is attenuated rather rapidly, 
it is possible to have a higher radi- 
ation efficiency than at lower fre- 
quencies for same antenna heights, 
and the two effects practically cancel 
each other. The higher frequency 
more readily permits the use of a ver- 
tical quarter-wave radiator with its 
desirable features. 

Service revenue 

Fortunately, most of the receivers 
in use are able to receive these ex- 
perimental broadcasts just above the 
broadcast band. A mail survey in the 
New York area disclosed that 80 per 
cent of the receivers could tune to 
1,550. In Kansas City W9XBY de- 
clares that 98 per cent of the receiv- 
ers can receive its program. W1XBS 




Checking high-frequency response 
with a variable-pitch whistle. 

in Waterbury, Conn., offered to adjust 
the receivers for a nominal fee so that 
they would tune to 1,600 kc, and now 
about 98 per cent of receivers within 
range can receive W1XBS. The 
migration of broadcasting to the 
1, 500-1, 600's thus offers a new possi- 
bility for the serviceman. Adjustment 
of some of the older type sets to re- 
ceive up to 1550 kc. is not too difficult 
and should produce a profitable in- 
come.* 

The phenomena of skip-distance at 
the higher frequencies is known to 
all radio men. For this reason dupli- 
cation of stations on any one chan- 
nel is to be avoided unless a great 
separation exists. If high-quality 
programs are to be enjoyed, the back- 
ground must be free of the "hash" 
and whistles now found at night on 
some of the channels above 1,000 kc. 

Engineering difficult 

From the broadcasting point of 
view the transmissions are more dif- 
ficult to engineer. The speech equip- 
ment must be very carefully designed. 
The studios represent a new problem. 
Echoes not ordinarily apparent are 
likely to show up with high-fidelity 
broadcasting. Non-directional micro- 
phones are used, and this involves a 



•John Rider discussed methods of in- 
creasing the frequency range of re- 
ceivers in the Octoher issue of RADIO 
TODAY. See page 24. 



18 



Radio Today 



somewhat different technique in the 
control room. 

The maintenance of the equipment 
is more exacting. Improper operation 
of equipment may not be noticeable 
with low fidelity, but it is readily ap- 
parent with high fidelity. The engi- 
neers must be more capable, and in- 
spections and tests should be very fre- 
quent to insure optimum operating 
conditions. Cathode ray monitoring 
is employed. 

More expensive 

John V. L. Hogan, owner and di- 
recting engineer of W2XR has esti- 
mated that the initial cost of a high- 
fidelity transmitter is from 30 to 
50 per cent higher than the ordi- 
nary station. But when it is con- 
sidered that high-quality music is 
made available to the public, the in- 
creased cost is rather insignificant. 

At the present W2XR is operating 
on a daily schedule of only three 
hours, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., but in 
the near future W2XR's activity will 
be greatly increased. A typical pro- 
gram follows: Waltz favorites, semi- 
classical ; Salon moods ; Hungarian 
gypsy ensemble; All-Brahms selec- 
tions; Press-Radio news, Brahms' fa- 
mous "Academic Overture." Much 
use is made of high-fidelity transcrip- 
tions, including those of the World 
Broadcasting System. 



TELEVISION TODAY 



Picture definition 

* Just where television 
''clarity of picture" stands today, 
with respect to other familiar picture 
services, was stated numerically by 
Dr. Alfred N. Goldsmith, consulting 
engineer, New York, before the com- 
mittee on engineering developments 
of the National Advisory Council on 
Radio in Education. 

A modern theatre motion-picture 
screen shows about 5,000,000 picture 
elements. 

A home-movie film has from one- 
half million to one million picture 
elements available. 

The best television definition today 
(cathode-ray type), involves from 
100,000 to 200,000 picture elements. 



BBC television 
ready March 1 

* The British Broad- 
casting Company has promised that 
television broadcast from London 
will begin on March 1, 1936, accord- 
ing to Louis Sterling, Director of 
Electrical Musical Instruments, Ltd. 
Both E.M.I, and Baird will cooperate 




Television active in Berlin. Monitor- 
ing position used by Reichs Rundfunh 
Gesellschaft. 

with the government in supplying the 
receivers. 

The E.M.I, receiver will have an 
image of six by eight inches and the 
list price is approximate^ $400 in 
American currently. It is of the 
cathode-ray type utilizing 405-line 
transmissions and operating at 50 
frames per second. 



Less advertising 

Last month for the first time, the 
FCC has permitted commercial broad- 
casting by these experimental sta- 
tions. In keeping with the good taste 
of the programs, mostly classical mu- 
sic, the advertising plugs have been 
made innocuous. Perhaps this her- 
alds the approach of a new "commer- 
cial" practice in broadcasting. W2XR 
has already obtained the full endorse- 
ment of the Women's National Radio 
Committee. 

John Wanamaker, one of New 
York's biggest department stores, 
sponsors a full hour's program five 
nights a week, while Packard Motor 
. Company of New York has con- 
tracted for spot announcements. Coal 
Carburetor Company, a local concern 
specializing in heating equipment is 
another advertiser. 

While true-fidelity broadcasting has 
not yet reached the heights, it is a 
very valuable proving ground for de- 
velopments in radio — many features 
have been tested in practice; and the 
Federal Radio Commission deserves 
praise for its foresight in licensing 
this most recent development. 




Cathode-ray oscillograph monitoring is employed in W2XR's control room 

in place of the sluggish power-level meter. Two pairs of turntables allow for 

the reproduction of all types of recordings including high fidelity. 



November, 1935 



19 



It 



ON THE 




Great programs help the dealer 
sell more and finer radios 



* Spectacular evidence of 
what remarkable merchandise the 
radio dealer is really selling in the 
programs now on the air is again of- 
fered in recent program announce- 
ments from the broadcasters. 

Amazing supply of features con- 
tinues to drift miraculously from re- 
sourceful studios, giving the dealer 
talking points which positively have 
no equal in the world of selling. 

Radio, flushed with 20th century 
supremacy, has made such an im- 
pressive and romantic bid for spec- 
tacular talent that the whole set of 
great artists has come over. "Art 
on the Air Waves" has arrived and 
it's all over the program lists for the 
benefit of those who wish for a more 
advanced type of entertainment than 
"torch singers and crooners." Sym- 
phonies, ace vocal and instrumental 
soloists, operatic sensations, and other 
musical gems from the upper levels 
are scattered generously through the 
broadcasts. A recent program list 
issued by the Eadio Institute of Au- 
dible Arts contained broadcast an- 
nouncements for five different sym- 
phonic organizations of recognized 
national importance, all playing on 
the air in regular schedule, several 
with soloists extraordinary. 

Self -destroying critics of radio, or 
anyone else who is indifferent to the 



new merit of the broadcasts, could 
scarcely NAME ONE GREAT LIV- 
ING ARTIST WHO HAS NOT 
BEEN ON THE AIE. What few of 
the big names are missing are now 
on the way. 

Headliners 

Billings from the studios this 
Fall include Paderewski, Lucrezia 
Bori, Jeritza, Martinelli, Jascha Hei- 
fetz, Grace Moore, Nino Martini, Lily 
Pons, Michael Bartlett, Rosa Pon- 
selle, Lotte Lehman, Lawrence Tib- 
bett, Mischa Levitzki, Cyrena Van 
Gordon, Deems Taylor, Sigmund 
Romberg, Helen Jepson, Gladys 
Swarthout, Nelson Eddy, Walter 
Damrosch, and others. And the voice 
of Pope Pius XI was recently heard 
in a special broadcast from Rome. 
Outside this group are broadcasts 
with star dance orchestras and all the 
stage and screen folk in whom public 
interest is tops. 

Broadcasters have a perfect right 
to wax lyric and extravagant on such 
presentations, and the "poor-program" 
propaganda looks thin and feeble to 
the point of being downright fan- 
tastic. 

Perhaps the most extraordinarily 
useful aspect of the matter as far as 
dealers are concerned is that any type 
of prospect can be appealed to with 




Give them time — all the screen stars get around to broadcast. Here are 

honeymooners Joan Crawford and Franchot Tone, shown with the latter's 

father, Frank J. Tone. 



the talk of brilliant broadcasts. There 
are always sport highlights, interna- 
tional hook-ups, news flashes, educa- 
tional, religious and political features, 
and a brand new emphasis on chil- 
dren's programs of a specially super- 
vised nature. Important also is a new 
trend toward radio appearances of 
stage and screen folk. 

Why tune in? 

Some dealers have already used 
these broadcast features in their ads, 
but as a rule the sales captions have 
read something like "get your set 
tuned up for the big league ball 
games" rather than "don't miss the 
Philharmonic even if you have to buy 
a new set." Point is that this pro- 
gram appeal has to be adapted to the 
tastes, musical or otherwise, of the 
local patronage and the fact that cur- 
rent broadcasts offer a sufficiently 
wide range for it, is indisputable. For 
what other reason do people buy sets 
than to tune in on the things they 
prefer ? 

Money spent on talent for broad- 
cast programs* sponsored by national 
advertisers mounts steadily as the 
leading manufacturers compete for 
stars. Dollars involved in talent traf- 
fic in July, 1935, was 175 per cent over 
the amount for July, 1933, and 60 
per cent over July, 1934. It will be 
noted, any time the American Asso- 
ciation of Advertising Agencies re- 
leases a breakdown of recent ad ex- 
penditures of national advertisers, 
that talent costs are obviously increas- 
ing at the expense of other items. 

Talent alone, 30 per cent 

Late surveys have shown that 30 
per cent of the total cost of an aver- 
age radio program is spent for talent, 
a substantial increase over the per- 
cents for '33 and '34. On the basis 
of Radio Today's estimate oi 1935-6 
business for CBS and NBC, approxi- 
mately $16,000,000 will be spent for 
network talent alone during the com- 
ing twelve months. 

With talent appropriations on the 
consistent increase, listeners may ex- 
pect to hear the biggest and most ex- 
pensive artists on the air as regular 
radio entertainers. 

Window poster 

To help dealers make a sharp ap- 
peal to street and store traffic on the 
basis of these costly features which 
go with every set sale, Radio Today 
offers on pages 16 and 17, a display 
which may be used as a window 
poster. 



20 



Radio Today 



NBC flashes 

•*■ First-string stars from 
opera, stage, and screen continue to 
be spotted as guests on big NBC bills, 
particularly on the RCA Magic Key 
program Sunday afternoons, WJZ, 
and the General Motors concerts Sun- 
day nights, WEAF. 

Otherwise : A new cast has taken 
over Lucky Strike's Hit Parade Sat- 
urday nights, WEAF. New line-up 
includes Al Goodman as musical di- 
rector, Loretta Lee, Willie Morris. 
Stuart Allen, the Frim Sisters and 
the Rhythm Kings. 

President Roosevelt will home-come 
to Georgia, his adopted state, on Nov. 
29, and his address will be aired from 
Atlanta on both NBC nets and the 
CBS web, beginning at 12 :30 p.m. 

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, 
directed by its brilliant young com- 
poser-conductor, Antonio Modarelli, 
will air a concert series Thursday 
nights on WJZ, starting Feb. 6. 

Feature broadcast from Moscow, 
Russia, is slated for Nov. 20 on 
WEAF net, beginning at 9 a.m. Pro- 
gram will observe the 25th anniver- 
sary of the death of Count Tolstoy, 
the famous author. Vassily Katcha- 
lov, one of the foremost Russian ac- 
tors, is on the program. 

Radio Guild's Thursday afternoon 
program on the Shakespeare "King 
Cycle," having finished with "King 
John" and "Richard II," will start 
with "Henry IV" on Nov. 21, and fol- 
low with "Henry V," "Henry VI," 
"Richard LTJ" and "Henry VIII," 
with an airing each week until Jan. 
16, except Nov. 28. Presentation on 
WJZ is using noted Shakespearean 
actors, and co-operates with huge 
strings of schools. 

Vittorio Giannini, distinguished 
young composer, with a fine rep here 
and abroad, will conduct an hour's 
program of his own works and pre- 
sent his cantata, "Primavera," for the 
first time in America over combined 
WEAF- WJZ nets, Nov. 29, at 11 a.m. 

CBS specials 

* New Ford program at 
CBS is set for Dec. 1, airing from 
2 :30 to 3 p.m. Sundays. The feature 
plugs the new Lincoln Zephyr and the 
artist is Jose Manzanares, with a 
South American ensemble. 

Manzanares' famed musicians re- 
cently completed an unusually suc- 
cessful engagement at the San Diego 
Exposition. Troupe is the only or- 
chestra in the country authorized by 
Latin American officials. 





Miss Jeanette MacDonald, soon to air 
some songs. 

"Krueger Musical Toast," a new 
WABC-CBS series, which got under 
way Nov. 9, happens at 8 :30 Saturday 
nights and features a grade A batch 
of talent. Ray Block's orchestra, 
Jerry Cooper and Sally Singer are 
the specials in it. 

Juilliard School of Music and CBS 
have their "Understanding Opera" 
series under way Tuesday evenings. 
Each program will feature notable 
soloists and choruses with the Colum- 
bia Symphony Orchestra, directed by 
Howard Barlow. 



Currently important dates on the 
Ford Sunday evening series are 
Cyrena Van Gordon, Nov. 17 ; Kir- 
sten Flagstad, Nov. 24; Albert 
Spalding, Dec. 1 ; Lawrence Melchior, 
Dec. 8; Elisabeth Rethberg, Dec. 15; 
a Stueckgold - Meisle - Crooks - Pinza 
quartet, Dec. 22, and Charles Kull- 
man, Dec. 29. 

MBS extras 

* Beginning Nov. 18, a 
top-notch Italian Conductor, Cesare 
Sodero, will conduct Monday night 
programs on WOR titled "Cesare 
Sodero Directs." Concert begins at 
10 :15 and the soloists will be Willard 
Amison, tenor; Verna Osborne, so- 
prano, and Garfield Swift, baritone. 
Large group of Choral Singers will 
also be featured. 

Fans will be delighted at the an- 
nouncement that Morton Bowe, tenor ; 
Gabriel Heatter, news commentator, 
and John Gambling, vet announcer, 
have been renewed by the station for 
another year. 

Rev. Charles E. Coughlin has re- 
newed his Sunday broadcasts on 
WOR and a group of independent sta- 
tions. Broadcasts arrive from Shrine 
of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, 
Michigan. Time is 4 p.m. 

Sunday nights, beginning Nov. 17 
at 10:45 p.m., MBS will air from 
Chicago a whole season of hockey 
games — those of the National Profes- 
sional Hockey League. On Nov. 24 
the Chicago Blackhawks meet the 
Montreal Maroons; thence through a 
heavy schedule to March 8. 




Major Bowes (right) gets a ten-gallon 



from a Texas official. 



November, 1935 



21 



There's a place for yo 

Don't be left behind . . . concentr 






TREMENDOUS ADVERTISING BACKS 
_— = — ~""T_ METAL TUBES 

nowuseMetalTubes 

XA r _„l „,!,/, thex are: 




Look who they are: 



tto - rf"~ r - c " 






g— ■le**- 2l^ 

Ho „a■rf«>•*'s- c *> (, * , ™*■" 
An d other manufacture » 












■riA M«w* ^uto 



Built Like 



.■EtSS— • 



O'"'^ 



as te sarf^ ^ ta „ „„**» u Jf^E S- ■ 

In Mcl»l ^ modem •utomo '^^^^. naoon. 



RCA Metal Tubes have proved a 
sensation without any direct adver- 
tising whatsoever. But we believe 
a good product deserves to be 
known and used by everybody. So 
one of the biggest advertising cam- 
paigns the industry has everknown 
is now telling the American public 
about the unquestionable supe- 
riority of Metal Tubes. A series of 
full-page, 1200-line and 1000-line 
ads are running in 103 newspapers 
in 83 cities. Behind these powerful 
ads are the weight and prestige not 
only of RCA, but of all 48 of the 
leading manufacturers who have 
adopted Metal Tubes in their sets. 
The industry is overwhelmingly be- 
hind Metal Tubes. The public is 
demanding sets with Metal Tubes. 
You can't afford to invest your 
money in anything else but Metal- 
Tube sets. Act now — before the 
pendulum has swung the full arc 
— before it's too late! 



IF TrrfTadio set with Metal Tubes 

Be modern-get a <•■ _-^^ 



Full-page advertisement 
which ran in the N. Y. Times 
and other newspapers Nov. 1 
— opening gun of a smashing 
campaign on Metal Tubes in 
over 1 00 leading newspapers 
throughout the country. 



rvv></\ 




RCA Manufacturing Co., Inc., Camden, N. J., a subs 



K 



in the Victory Parade ! 

i on sets with METAL TUBES! 



are over! They are used 
; radio manufacturers . . . 
ming majority of the 
2 public is asking for 
:nd those manufacturers 
hat demand with fabu- 
on schedules. Climb on 
ya. and get your share 
hat belong to the victor! 
Christmas is just around 
>u can't afford now to 
e on diminishing sales 
Tin with the winner . . . 
TUBES! 

of RCA Metal Tubes was 
)t. They were a natural 
;inning. A radio tube 
uld be built for the first 
y! Developed 
aade by RCA. 
he public not 
ment" but as 
icores of tests 
ig than a radio 




tube ever encountered in regular ser- 
vice ... a new champion ! 

Hailed by the trade press, imme- 
diately and enthusiastically indorsed 
by a vast majority of set manufacturers, 
yet without a single word of direct ad- 
vertising, RCA Metal Tubes have taken 
the set-buying public by storm! With 
its instinctive recognition of a great 
practical advance and its eagerness to 
make use of its benefits, the public 
cannot be fooled! 

No, there was never a doubt. 
Merely a question of time until pro- 
duction could begin to catch up 
with the staggering demand. Now, 
production is up. We are able to 
supply most of the needs of our 
set customers. And Metal- 
Tube radios of 48 leading 
radio makers are pouring 
off the lines in steady, end- 
less streams. A great victory 
has been won! 





PIONEERING FOR PROFITS 

Every industry you can think of has brought 
rich rewards to those who pioneered in 
producing its products. Pioneering made 
this country what it is today, the envy of 
the world, the land of opportunity. You 
can't stop America, because YOU CAN'T 
STOP PROGRESS! Metal Tubes designed 
by the famed G.E. laboratories and made by 
RCA represent pioneering and progress 
both. They are bringing the rewards of 
pioneering this very minute to all those 
who are alert enough to recognize them for 
what they are— the greatest single aid to 
set selling today! 






\L TUBES 

of the RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



There's a place for you in the Victory Parade ! 

Don't be left behind . . . concentrate on sets with METAL TUBES ! 



TREMENDOUS ADVERTISING BACKS 

_ METAL TUBES 

look who * my -ss£~- 



„«*••*'•■*' 












:er „— Sir- :££•- 









OW*** K-iheOV*"* . _«.lh»l»h' ™* .„«/« 

. T ta «. * S, '<" "' «1 Or-" "^ 

IU* F "J "7 ,»| D|"»« *Sv ,121 So«» G " 4 ' 
p^ot Tun" dyn c OK • 

S Mewl ■C« b ^ '° mw j er , « ulonlo r c C ;, M i c «6n4 a* 1 '* 

-honel^ w '"* tC .he low" ="" '° ™U lhi» « dta * . 



RCA Metal Tubes have proved a 
sensation without any direct adver- 
tising whatsoever. But we believe 
a good product deserves to be 
known and used by everybody. So 
one of the biggest advertising cam- 
paigns the industry has ever known 
is now telling the American public 
about the unquestionable supe- 
riority of Metal Tubes. A series of 
full-page, 1200-line and 1000-hne 
ads are running in 103 newspapers 
in 83 cities. Behind these powerful 
ads are the weight and prestige not 
only of RCA, but of all 48 of the 
leading manufacturers who have 
adopted Metal Tubes in their sets. 
The industry is overwhelmingly be- 
hind Metal Tubes. The public is 
demanding sets with Metal Tubes. 
You can't afford to invest your 
money in anything else but Metal- 
Tube sets. Act now — before the 
pendulum has swung the full arc 
—before it's too late! 



Full-page advertisement 
which ran in the N. Y. Times 
and other newspapers Nov. 1 
— opening gun of a smashing 
campaign on Metal Tubes in 
over 100 leading newspapers 
throughout the country. 



Metal TV 
by 48 leai 



es are over! They are used 
ing radio manufacturers . . . 
an overwhelming majority of the 
industry, The public is asking for 
MetalTu 2s and those manufacturers 
are meet g that demand with fabu- 
lous proi iction schedules. Climb on 
the banc 'agon and get your share 
of theprijits that belong to the victor! 
Don'tjait. Christmas is just around 
the benckYou can't afford now to 
take a cance on diminishing sales 
and profits. Win with the winner . . . 
RCA ME|AL TUBES! 
Thesu ess of RCA Metal Tubes was 
oubt. They were a natural 
beginning. A radio tube 
built as Should be built for the first 
time in |tory! Developed 
byGJ.* dm adebyRCA. 
Ptesenttt-o the public not 
gg aI1 "e'teriment" but as 
a Vetera scores of tests 
morepT" 1 ^ than a radio 



never in 
from tW 



tube ever encountered in regular ser- 
vice ... a new champion! 

Hailed by the trade press, imme- 
diately and enthusiastically indorsed 
by a vast majority of set manufacturers, 
yet without a single word of direct ad- 
vertising, RCA Metal Tubes have taken 
the set-buying public by storm! With 
its instinctive recognition of a great 
practical advance and its eagerness to 
make use of its benefits, the public 
cannot be fooled! 

No, there was never a doubt. 
Merely a question of time until pro- 
duction could begin to catch up 
with the staggering demand. Now, 
production is up. We are able to 
supply most of the needs of our 
set customers. And Metal- 
Tube radios of 48 leading 
radio makers are pouring 
off the lines in steady, end- 
less streams. A great victory 
has been won! 




PIONEERING FOR PROFITS 

Every industry you can think of has brought 
rich rewards to those who pioneered in 
producing its products. Pioneering made 
this country what it is today, the envy of 
the world, the land of opportunity. You 
can't stop America, because YOU CAN'T 
STOP PROGRESS! Metal Tubes designed 
by the famed G.E. laboratories and made by 
RCA represent pioneering and progress 
both. They are bringing the rewards of 
pioneering this very minute to all those 
who are alert enough to recognize them for 
what they are— the greatest single aid to 
set selling today! 






■ 



I 



RCA METKL TUBES 




HJ^H^^^^^H lnc -< Carnden, N ^| 




INSTALLMENT SELLING 

New angles for the dealer on 
the present time-payment set-up 



* RADIO dealers throughout the 
country are facing a new set of cir- 
cumstances currently important in 
the matter of time-payments for re- 
ceivers. With 70 per cent of radio 
sets being sold on the installment 
plan, radio men have discovered by 
this time what credit plan to use, and 
precisely how to adapt it to the type 
of patron most often appearing at the 
credit windows of their stores. But 
lately there have been developments, 
nationally speaking, which may give 
such dealers a clue as to what to ex- 
pect if they apply for financing from 
national organizations in this field. 

C.l.T. back in 

Finance companies have recently 
shown an interest in radio again, and 
have taken steps which would have 
been unheard of three years ago. Com- 
mercial Investment Trust Co., One 
Park Ave., New York City, has been 
acting as the time-payment financing 
organization for eight of the leading 
radio manufacturers through con- 
tracts which have been signed in re- 
cent months. These are the makers 
of the following sets : RCA, Atwater 
Kent, Stromberg-Carlson, Stewart- 
Warner, Grunow, Crosley, Sparton, 
and Graybar. More recently, CIT 
announced that it had completed ex- 
clusive agreements with the Emerson 
Radio and Phonograph Corp. and No- 
blitt-Sparks Industries, Inc., whereby 



the company will act as official finan- 
cier for Emerson and Arvin radio 
dealers and distributors. 

Under the CIT plan, a comprehen- 
sive financing system is offered to re- 
tailers through the company's 140 
branch offices. The service does not 
apply to auto radios. CIT head- 
quarters are in New York, Chicago, 
and San Francisco, but branch of- 
fices are functioning in the central 
cities of all states. 

Catchy offers 

Big radio retail outfits in the East 
are offering a variety of plans in their 
own credit departments, without a 
hook-up with the financing companies. 
Obviously, they are setting the pace 
for smaller dealers elsewhere, except 
in cases where the local set-seller 
must steadfastly adapt his plan to 
conditions peculiar to his area. What 
the big fellows are doing about the 
new groups which are asking for 
credit makes a profitable study for 
outlying dealers who will soon find 
themselves in a similar swim. 

One retail company will give credit 
on even the lowest priced set in the 
store, which happens to be $5.95, other 
aspects of the matter being satisfac- 
tory. Payments as a rule are spread 
over one year, although a special 18- 
month period can be arranged. Plan 
is advertised as costing the patron y 2 
per cent per month, which amounts to 




Christmas time in a radio dealer's window — a time for spirited promotion 

of quality sets. 



an interest charge of 6 per cent per 
year. Feature of the arrangement is 
a 90-day period without interest. At 
least 5 per cent must be paid down. 
Company reports that it does 90 per 
cent of its radio business on this basis. 

A leading chain asks $5 down, 
charges no interest whatever, and de- 
mands no second payment for 30 days. 
After that, the payments are as little 
as $1 weekly. This service is not ex- 
tended to a buyer of a set priced be- 
low $29. 

Others are asking no money down 
and $1 weekly but in most cases such 
terms are not available on sets priced 
below $20. 

Seats at the show 

At this point most time-payment 
plans are being advertised in terms of 
the most attractive details, rather 
than publicizing such captions as 
"Easy Terms" and "Ask About Our 
Convenient Payment Plan." In some 
cases good results have been realized 
from ads which feature current broad- 
casts. Features are outlined for the 
week and the ad concludes : "It costs 
you only $1 for this array of ring- 
side seats." On this score, dealers 
can always give special attention to 
local sport events. 

Special method of plugging time- 
payment plans is being used by 
Stewart-Warner dealers and distribu- 
tors. Company has arranged for dis- 
tribution of electrically transcribed 
15-minute programs for use of the 
local station. The discs are first-rate 
quality, and leave ample time for the 
dealer to explain his credit plan. 

To hike volume 

Whatever the method of plugging, 
dealers are conveniently keeping in 
mind that once a customer is credited, 
it is, under present circumstances, 
worth while to play up the higher- 
priced sets more than ever before. The 
1936 models have such a list of im- 
posing features that a small monthly 
payment seems easy to pay for the 
extraordinary brand of entertainment 
immediately forthcoming. It is for 
this reason that a merchant who sells 
radios exclusively has a certain ad- 
vantage over the radio merchandiser 
of a department store. The former 
can play the air features, which are 
costing the broadcasters millions 
every season, directly against the 
small time payments which he will 
accept in return for the costliest en- 
tertainment in the world. 

Special appeals can also be made 
along with credit plans to the house- 
holder who may buy a second or third 
set for the home. 



24 



Radio Today 



m, s 



\9S° 



&*? 



c\o* e 



-aV s 



Lily Pons & Kostelanetz 










¥ 




Burns & Allen 



There's space for only 6 close-ups on this page. So we picked 6 at random from among Columbia's full schedule of radio 
favorites. We'll show you all the others, soon. The Columbia Broadcasting System, 485 Madison Avenue, New York. 



THE IMPORTANCE OF RECTIFICATION 



John Rider explains the function of many of 
radios complicated circuits in terms of rectification 



* DID you ever analyze the num- 
ber of different functions performed 
in a radio receiver — which are re- 
ferred to or spoken of by a number 
of different names — but which are 
founded upon one and the same basic 
principle? . . . The power of inter- 
pretation cultivated by recognizing 
the function as related to a basic prin- 
ciple does much towards facilitating 
comprehension of radio theory. . . . 
This is quite an important considera- 
tion, because it reduces the number 
of supposedly distinctly different ele- 
ments of a modern radio receiver and 
makes it easier to understand the 
workings of these new innovations. 
Take as an example the process of 
rectification. 

Eectification, as we understand the 
term, involves one basic principle — 
namely, asymmetrical conductions. 
Expressed in a different manner, a 
rectifier as applied to radio and allied 
fields is a device whereby an alternat- 
ing current is changed into unidirec- 
tional current, which naturally means 
that an alternating voltage is changed 
into a unidirectional voltage, varying 
between zero and maximum. . . . Or 
if the relation between the input and 
output circuits is such that input 
voltage and output current are in- 
volved, then the device as a result of 
its non-symmetrical conduction char- 
acteristic (asymmetrical conduction) 
will change alternating voltage into 
unidirectional current, varying be- 
tween zero and maximum. . . . The 
variation of the output current, be- 
tween zero and maximum, is in con- 



.ELECTRON 
\EMITr£/1 



formity with the variation from zero 
to maximum of the input alternating 
voltage. This is the basic principle 
of the rectifier and is applicable to all 
types of rectifiers, such as vacuum 
tube rectifiers, electrolytic rectifiers, 
gas rectifiers, oxide rectifiers, vibrat- 
ing rectifiers, etc. ... At the pres- 
ent time, however, we shall concern 
ourselves solely with vacuum tube 
rectifiers. 

Power rectifiers 

The basic circuit for power recti- 
fiers is shown in Figs. 1 and 2. Fig. 
1 is that of a half wave rectifier and 
Fig. 2 shows a full wave rectifier. 
The electron emitter may be the 
cathode in tubes which employ a 
cathode, or is the filament in tubes 
which use a filament as the electron 
emitter. E in both cases is the load 
upon the rectifier system, across which 
the output voltage is developed. C 
is a condenser connected across the 
output of the rectifier system. 

Obviously, a power rectifier system 
which furnishes an output voltage, 
although unidirectional, but which 
varies between two wide limits, would 
not be satisfactory. Hence, since that 
condition exists in the rectifier tube 
and its output circuit, supplementary 
condensers and filter chokes are used, 
so that the output voltage supplied by 
the complete system has a steady 
value. It should, of course, be remem- 
bered that the process of arranging 
for a constant d-c. voltage output is 
something supplementary to the ac- 
tual process of rectification and its 



ELECTRON 
EMITTER 




INPUT 
VOLTACE 



TolZl AAAAA 

(WITH NO FILTER) '''''' 
FIG.2 



The half wave rectifier 
diagramed in Fig. 1, 
passes one-half of the 
cycle producing a fun- 
damental ripple of 60 
cycles. The full wave 
circuit of Fig. 2 recti- 
fies both halves of the 
voltage and gives a 
fundamental ripple of 
120 cycles to be filtered. 
The latter requires less 
smoothing. 



immediately related system, namely, 
the source of input a-c. and the rec- 
tifier. 

Detectors 

The detector tube or the detector 
action also comes under the main 
heading of rectification, for the proc- 
ess of detection likewise depends upon 
asymmetrical conduction. The detec- 
tor tube rectifies the carrier and per- 
mits a greater flow of output current 
for one half of the radio frequency 




Detection as visualized by the cathode- 
ray oscillograph. 

cycle than for the other half of the 
cycle. . . . As a matter of fact, we 
generally assume that in the conven- 
tional detector circuit there is no 
plate current flow during the lower or 
negative half of the modulated wave 
envelope. What really takes place 
during the usual process of detection 
is that the lower or negative half of 
the modulated wave envelope is elim- 
inated and as a result of the elements 
in the load circuit (plate circuit) of 
the two or more element detector, the 
audio signal is extracted from the rec- 
tified output. This is shown in Figs. 
3 and 4. Fig. 3 is an oscillogram of 
a modulated signal fed into a detector 
tube and Fig. 4 is the resultant audio 
output. Note that the wave shape of 
the audio output corresponds with the 
positive half of the wave envelope. 
The lower or negative half of the in- 
put modulated wave has been elim- 
inated. 



26 



Radio Today 



EUERY TRDDITI0I1 OF RADIO UDLUE UPSET BV 
THE I1EUJ 




There is nothing in the history of radio by 
which the importance of this announce- 
ment may be measured . . . radio has not 
known such a value before. Right out 
of Crosley's laboratory it has come, this 
feature set with American reception, for- 
eign reception, metal tubes; a set of re- 
markable performance at an unbelievably 
low price. Only in the other numbers of 
the Crosley 1936 radio line will you find 
comparable values. Think of the sensa- 
tion which the Crosley A. F. M. radio 
will create when you show it in your 
window, on your floor, demonstrate it to 
your customers. Make the most of its 
sales-pulling powers by getting in touch — 
now — with your Crosley distributor. 



CROSLEY A.F.M. TABLE MODEL 

Cabinet has figured walnut veneer on front panel . 
Dimensions: ll^" high, lOj^" wide, 73^" deep. 

Prices in Florida, Rocky Mountain Slates and West slightly higher. 




CHASSIS - Superheterodyne. Five 
metal tubes. Two tun- 
ing bands — American (540-1710 kc). 
foreign (2350-7500 kc). Other fea- 
tures: 

1 TWO HIGH CAPACITY REGULAT- 
I ENG WET ELECTROLYTIC CON- 
DENSERS maintain proper voltage 
thereby protecting other units of the 
' frorn voltagf; overload. Also 
s reservoirs supplying sudden 
plate current tending to 
prevent overload or peak distortion of 
the receiver. 

POWER TRANSFORMER is so de- 
signed and constructed as to insure 
long, uniterrupted operation. 
TONE CONTROL hag two positions 

bo that the user may enjoy cither treble 
or bass as he may desire. 



I DIAL LIGHTS completely illuminate 
f the dial the instant the set is turned on. 
' VOLUMECONTROLAND SWITCH 

enables the user to select the volume 
output most desired for any position 
from a whisper to full strength. This 

automatic volume control tends to coun- 
teract fading and maintain uniform 
volume. 

ILLUMINATED FULL VISION 
AIRPLANE TYPE DIAL enhances 
the appearance of the set and places 
the entire range within full vision. 
VERNIER DRIVE STATION SE- 
LECTOR with 5 to 1 ratio drive ma- 
terially facilitates tuning in the desired 



ELECTRO-DYNAMIC SPEAKER 

assures a life-like reproduction of tone 
whether the volume control is turned 
down low or up to its highest level. 



I. F. TRANSFORMER 

COMPLETELY SHIELDED SEC- 
OND I. F. TRANSFORMER. The 

I. F. Amplifier, incorporating com- 
pletely shielded I. F. Transformers, is 
of a high gain, high selectivity type, in- 
suring pood overall selectivity and 
sensitivity. 

One type 6A8 Oscillator Modulator 
(double purpose) tube. One type 6K7 
I. F. amplifier tube. One type 6J7 
Detector and A. F. Amplifier (double 
purpose) tube. One type 6F6 Output 
tube. One type 5Z4 Rectifier tube. 



THE CROSLEY RADIO CORPORATION - Cincinnati 



POWEL CROSLEY, Jr., President 



Home of ''the Nation's Station" — WLW — 500,000 watts — most powerful in the world — 70 on your dial 




November, 1935 



27 



NEW 

SET TESTERS 




COMPLETE SET TESTER CI C CA 

ONLY $10. 9U 

RELIABILITY AT 

LOW COST 

This popular three meter Set Tester 
checks all parts of radio tube circuits 
by plugging directly into the receiving 
set sockets. 

D.C. Voltmeter Scale 20-60-300-600 
D.C. Milliammeter Scale 15-150 
A.C. Voltmeter Scale 10-140-700 
Panel jacks are provided to make in- 
dividual range connections. 

MODEL 710-A 

Complete in Black Leatherette Covered 

Case. Dealer Net Price $16.50 

MODEL 712-A 

Same as 710-A but having Triplett 
moving coil Model 223 2" D.C. Volt- 
meter (1000 ohms per volt). Dealer 
Net Price $22.20 

Where reliability is desired at low cost, 
turn to Readrite — all Readrite mer- 
chandise is built rugged — it will stand 
up — it will give dependable perform- 
ance over a long period of time. 

OTHER PRODUCTS 

Readrite manufactures all types of 
testers used for servicing Radio Sets, 
including Set Testers, Tube Testers, 
Resistance, Continuity and Capacity 
Testers, Point-to-Point Testers and in- 
expensive Indicating Meters. 

SEE YOUR JOBBER 




THIS COUPON BRINGS FACTS 



1 READRITE METER WORKS 

| 1911 College Drive, Bluflton, Ohio 

■ Please send me full information on 
1 Model 710-A Readrite Complete Set 

I Tester 

| Catalogue 

| Name 

I Street Address 

I City State 



USES OF RECTIFICATION — JOHN RIDER 



{From page 26) 



Heterodyne detection 

A much better representation of de- 
tector action is shown in Figs. 5 and 
6. What is indicated here is identical 
to what is accomplished in beat oscil- 
lator arrangements for e.w. reception ; 
this arrangement is a feature in sev- 
eral commercial receivers and is also 
used as a tuning indicator or "station 
spotter." Fig. 5 illustrates the wave 
envelope of two signals of different 
frequencies fed into the detector tube. 
These two voltages are alternately in 
phase and out of phase, thus giving 
rise to the variation in amplitude. 
The rate of amplitude variation oc- 
curs at the difference frequency. Fig. 
6 shows the voltage across the load of 
the detector tube and you can see that 
the lower half of the input voltage 
pattern has been eliminated. In ef- 
fect the input voltage has been rec- 
tified and with proper equipment in 
the load circuit of the detector, the 
signal which would be extracted from 
the rectified wave would be of the fre- 
quency representative of the rate of 
amplitude variation. In order that 
the picture of Fig. 6 be as clear as 
that shown in Fig. 4, it would be nec- 
essary to filter out all the frequencies 
represented by the lines running ver- 
tically. They appear in this pattern, 
because this test was made by using 
comparatively low frequencies, where- 
as the carrier used in Fig. 3 and not 
appearing in Fig. 4 was of a high fre- 
quency and was filtered out. 

From what has been said, you can 
gather that the heterodyning process 
to produce a difference frequency is 
also founded upon rectification. As 
far as basis of operation is concerned, 
the heterodyne oscillator used for 
e.w. reception, the signal beacon for 
spotting stations as used in the re- 
ceivers, and the operation of the first 
detector (also known as modulator, 
translator, mixer, etc.) used in super- 




heterodyne receivers also depend upon 
rectification. 

The process of rectification ss ap- 
plied to detector tube is applicable to 
the diode circuit, which is substan- 
tially identical to the half wave rec- 
tifier or the full wave rectifier, de- 
pending upon the use of a half wave 
or full wave diode detector. An ex- 
ample of the half wave and full wave 
diode circuit detector as used in com- 
mercial receivers is shown in Figs. 7 
and 8. Ignore the a-f. circuit con- 
nections and you will find that this 
circuit is identical to the half wave 
and full wave rectifiers of Figs. 1 and 
2. In Fig. 7, the 1.0 megohm resistor 
is the E of Fig. 1 and the two diodes 




Fig. 7 — The half wave diode detector 

is similar to the half wave power 

rectifier. 



Fig. 8 — Second harmonic distortion 

in detection is eliminated by using 

the full wave diode detector. 

constitute the signal plate. In Fig. 8 
the two diodes are used as the two 
plates of Fig. 2, and the 150,000 ohm 
resistor is the R of Fig. 2. 

Demodulation 

In grid bias detectors of the three 
or more element variety, rectification 
takes place in the plate circuit, be- 
cause only the positive half of the 
modulated wave envelope is amplified 
■ — the negative half being eliminated. 

In the grid-leak and condenser type 
detectors, rectification occurs in the 
grid circuit. When a modulated wave 
is applied to the grid of the tube, grid 
current flows through the grid leak. 
This rectified current varies in ampli- 
tude in accordance with the modula- 
tion of the carrier and a voltage is 
developed across the grid leak-con- 
denser combination, which combina- 
tion is in effect the load upon the rec- 
tifier system. This voltage is applied 
to the grid of the detector tube and 
is amplified in the plate circuit by 
ordinary amplifier action and is pro- 
ductive of the detector output. . . . 
Once more rectification is the basic 
principle. 



28 



Radio Today 



Automatic volume control 

Automatic volume control depends 
upon rectification — that is, for the 
control voltage. One tube or one of 
the elements of a multi-purpose tube 
is used to rectify a portion of the sig- 
nal and the rectified signal develops a 
voltage across the load resistor "which 
is applied to the tubes to be controlled 
as a varying bias. As stated in con- 
nection with the basic rectifier circuit, 
the output voltage, while unidirec- 
tional, varies between zero and maxi- 
mum in conformity with the input 
voltage; in the case of the AVO cir- 
cuits, this is in conformity with the 
carrier amplitude. Hence the rec- 
tified voltage in the AVC circuit will 
increase when the carrier voltage in- 
creases and will decrease as the car- 
rier voltage decreases, thereby supply- 
ing a variable bias, which, when 
properly distributed to the controlled 
tubes, maintains the amplification 
available with these tubes, at a pre- 
determined level. What has been said 
is true with diode or multi-element 
tubes used as the rectifiers or detec- 
tors. By tapping off the negative end 
of the load resistor, at the proper 
point, the required control voltage is 
made available. By proper filtering 
of the carrier, possible audio varia- 
tions are kept out of the controlled 
circuits. As far as we are concerned, 
these items are incidental to the fact 
that rectification is the basis of AVC 
operation. 

Unusual AVC 

A unique application, somewhat 
different from the conventional, is 
shown in Fig. 9. We show this in- 
stead of the conventional arrangement 
because it is representative of what 
we said, that comprehension of the 
basic operating principles will help 
clarify supposed mysteries. Fig. 9 
illustrates a circuit used in several 
commercial receivers, such as the Sil- 




Fig. 9 — -The diode detector provides 

bias for an automatic volume control 

circuit. 

vertone 1700 and 7-62, wherein a tube 
acts as an i-f. amplifier and AVC. 
The latter is of interest. A portion of 
the i-f. voltage in the plate circuit of 
the 6B7 tube (the i-f. transformer 
coupling this tube to the second de- 
tector is not shown), is fed back to the 
diode plate through the 15 mmfd. con- 
denser. Rectification takes place be- 
tween the diode plates (both being 
used as a common plate) and the 
cathode. The load resistor is com- 
prised of the series combination of the 
100,000 and 400,000 ohm units. This 
circuit is identical in structure to the 
conventional half wave rectifier of 
Fig. 1. (The 700 ohm resistor is also 
in the circuit, but the major units are 
the two resistors R-4 and R-5.) 

By connecting the 6A7 cathode to 
point A and the control grid (through 
the i-f. transformer) to point B, the 
6A7 tube is negatively biased by the 
voltage developed across R-4 and R-5, 
as a result of rectification. The con- 
trol bias for the triode portion of the 
6B7 used as an i-f. amplifier is se- 
cured by connecting its control grid 
to the junction of R-4 and R-5 and 
the voltage developed across R-5 (as 
a result of rectification) is applied to 
the 6B7. 

The actual rectifier and AVC eir-. 
euit shown here is typical of the diode 
tube AVC voltage sources as used in 
the majority of receivers. Where a 
triode is used as the source of the 




10 — Automatic noise suppression is obtained by making the 
amplifier inoperative when the station is out of tune. 








A "Money "Saving 
VOLUME WT±-d- 

roviuor JHLIX 



Here's how you save three ways: 

(1) Time-saving — you're always ready 
to service the most popular radio sets. 

(2) Cash-saving — you enjoy the quan- 
tity price on volume controls and 
switches — and FREE flexible resistors. 

(3) Labor-saving — these components 
are standard Clarostat quality: they 
"stay put" — no kicks and return calls 
to make good. 

• Kits available in two kinds: One, 
with composition type controls; 
the other with wire-wound con- 
trols. Stock both kinds! 

• Five different and niost popular 
resistance values, plus five FREE 
%-watt flexible resistors applied 
externally for desired bias re- 
sistance. 

• Three power switches that snap 
on any Clarostat volume control. 

New Clarostat 
FREE Manual Volume Control 

Replacem ent 
Manual now ready. Send one too of 
Clarostat Volume Control carton to 
identify yourself as a service man, en- 
titled to a copy. Meanwhile, order your 
volume control kits from local jobber. 



CLAROSTAT 

JWU, MANUFACTURING CO. 
f ^? Incorporated 

285 North Sixth St. 

Brooklvn. X. Y. 





Contents of Kit 

Volume Controls {either 3 Add-a-Switclies 

Composition or Wire- 5 Flexible Resistors 
Wound) 



November, 1935 



29 



TUBE TESTER 




1936 




THE TRIPLEXT MODEL 1310 — 

TESTS ALL, TYPES — NET DEALER 

PRICE ONLY $30.00 

HERE is a simplified tube tester 
that is easy to operate — yet it 
tests all types, metal and glass, in- 
cluding new 6P7 and 12A5. Con- 
forms to all standards of good engi- 
neering practice. 

The compound circuit used by Trip- 
lett to obtain this simplicity is amaz- 
ingly accurate. It will definitely ac- 
cept or reject tubes on the English 
Reading Good-Bad Scale — It also has 
short test and separate diode test. 
The Model 1310 is furnished in a 
handsome modernistic portable wood 
case of two tone walnut — While very 
attractive, it is also impressive and 
professional. The removable cover 
and sloping panel make it particu- 
larly adaptable for counter or port- 
able use. Dealer Net Price. . .$30.00 



* Pmcwok* 

electrical instruments 

MAIL COUPON FOR DETAILS 

Triiilett Electrical Instrument Co. 
1911 Harmon Avenue, 

iniuiti.il, Ohio, u.s.a. 

Please send me (check) 

More information 1310 

Catalog information on 

Name 

Street . . . 

City State 



I 



SERVICING 

(From page 29) 

AVC voltage, rectification is still the 
basic principle, for the control voltage 
is the result of rectification of a por- 
tion of the i-f. signal. 

Automatic noise suppression 

Automatic noise suppression sys- 
tems depend upon rectification as the 
means of securing the controlling sig- 
nal, which will release the "locked" 
stage or stages, as the case may be. 
Opening the locked stage or stages 
may be accomplished by changing the 
voltage applied to the control, screen, 
or suppressor grids. Whichever sys- 
tem is used, or whatever the name 
applied to the system, you will find 
that the source which supplies the 
trigger voltage to release the locked 
stage is a rectifier system, which 
comes into play when the signal is 
tuned in. It is possible that amplifica- 
tion of this voltage takes place, so as 
to provide the required magnitude of 
releasing or trigger voltage. Be that 
as it may, rectification invariably is 
the basis of operation. Examine 
Fig. 10. 

Tube 37 is the detector and AVC 
control. Tube 78 is the trigger tube 
and tube 77 is the first stage audio 
amplifier. Note that the screen grid 
of the amplifier tube (77) receives its 
voltage through a 1.0 megohm re- 
sistor, which is also joined to the plate 
of the control or "squelch" tube. 
Without any signal input, there is no 
bias applied to tube 78 and the plate 
current is high. This causes a high 
voltage drop across the 1.0 meg re- 
sistor and the voltage at the screen 
of the a-f. amplifier is so low that the 
tube is inoperative; hence the speaker 
is silent. Wlien a signal is tuned 
in, a bias is applied to the grid of the 
.control tube, via the 4.0 meg resistor. 
. . . The plate current decreases and 
the voltage drop across the 1.0 meg 
resistor decreases and the voltage at 
the screen grid of the a-f. tube (77) 
rises to the value required for normal 
operation of the tube. . . . The sys- 
tem is somewhat involved, but it 
rotates around rectification of the car- 
rier by tube 37 and application of this 
rectified voltage to the trigger tube. 

Tuning indicators 

Rectification plays an important 
role in tuning indicators of most types. 
We refer in particular to the types 
which employ an i-f. transformer or 
which are tied in with a winding, 




Hurry, Service Dealers, ask your job- 
ber how to get all or any of N. U. — 
Rider Manuals Free on SPECIAL 
LIMITED OFFER! 

. . . and remember, this is only one of the many pieces of 
equipment you can get free with National Union tube 
purchases. You'll have to act fast if you want to get 
Manuals on the special basis, but, whether you do 
or not, be sure to get full details of other free offers. 



(NEW VOL 
JuME SIX 
^INCLUDED 



4fr 

g NATIONAL UNfON RADIO CORP. OF N. Y. 

J« 570 Le.inglon Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

fc Tell me what shop equipment I con get, how I can X 

iZ get it and where I ? 

i, RT 1135 V 

Ji Name X J 



(OFFERS^ 
/EXPIRE I 
IDEC.I5,I935/ T-^ 




Stre 



ijj City __State 5| 



Keep OUT IN FRONT 

Allied* Radio 

Servicemen! Dealers! The 1936 ALLIED Radio 
Catalog will keep you out in front. It's a real index 
to radio progress — complete, timely — brimming over 
with thousands of quality parts — sparkling with new 
Test Equipment developments, new P. A. Systems, 
new Metal Tube Radios — rich with full selections of 
the finest standard radio lines — everything to save 
you money and to help keep you out in front. 

(/irk Cxa^nplc 

OSCILLOGRAPHS 

The 1936 ALLIED Catalog shows 
a complete variety of oscillo- 
graphs and oscilloscopes — of every 
known make — the very latest types 
of test equipment for visual 
servicing, checking, measuring, 
etc. . . . 

You need the 1936 ALLIED 
Catalog. It is your guide to 
every class of equipment needed 
in Servicing, Public Address, 
Laboratory, Amateur and Ex- 
perimentaL work. Everything for 
the entire trade — any part, any 
brand, any time you want it — at the lowest prices — 
all backed by a highly personalized service to meet 
your specialized needs. Keep an ALLIED Catalog 
by your side — it pays. 

SEND FOR YOUR FREE COPY 

ALLIED RADIO CORP. 

833 XV. Jackson Blvd. Dept. TR 

Chicago, Illinois 

□ Send me your FREE 1936 Radio Catalog. 

Namo 

Address 

City State 




30 



Radio Today 



usually a tertiary winding upon an 
i-f. transformer. Either a meter or 
a glow tube, used in the plate cir- 
cuit, is actuated when the receiver is 
tuned to a station and a signal volt- 
age is applied to the input circuit of 
the tube used as a rectifier or com- 
bination rectifier and amplifier. Am- 
plification is used in some circuits to 
secure the desired change in operating 
potentials so that the meter indication 
or glow intensity is of proper value 
or brilliancy. The tube which serves 
as a tuning indicator tube, regardless 
of what commercial trade name is ap- 
plied, invariably is functioning as a 
rectifier. 

Expander circuit 

The expander system used in the 
audio system of the RCA D22-1 re- 
ceiver likewise depends upon rectifica- 
tion — this time of an a-f. signal. To 
show this circuit and to enter into a 
full discussion would take more space 
than is available at this time. How- 
ever, the system functions as a means 
of compensating for the limitations 
imposed upon disc recording so that 
the stylus will not break from one 
groove into another when low sounds 
are recorded. The depth of the cut is 
regulated so that the cutting stylus 
will not break into the adjacent 
groove when recording high level 
sounds. Because of the consequent 
limitations between minimum and 
maximum intensities in the recording, 
reproduction of the recording cannot 
be the same as the original sound 
produced in the recording studio. 

The volume expander serves to ex- 
pand the sound in conformity with 
the limitations imposed, thereby caus- 
ing the relation between high and low 
level sounds to be the same as orig- 
inally produced in the studio. This 
increase and decrease is accomplished 
by rectifying a portion of the signal 
picked up from the record and apply- 
ing this controlling signal to the ex- 
pander tube system. The output of 
the rectifier stage varies in direct re- 
lation with the average value of in- 
tensity of the audio signal. Whereas 
the normal gain in an amplifier re- 
mains constant during operation, this 
rectified signal causes a continual rise 
and fall of the overall gain. 

(Editor's Note : We are anxious to 
learn if you are interested in such 
material as is presented about rec- 
tification and applied to other basic 
functions in radio receivers. Correla- 
tion between basic functions and re- 
lated applications should be of aid. 
. . . Do you think so ? . . . What 
are your comments?) 



SPECIFY SYLVANIAS! 



sviv 



W*\ 



JMh 



Whether you're ordering metal tubes or the stand- 
ard glass tubes . . . get the best! Specify Sylvanias! 

• For three years Sylvania has led all other tube manufacturers in supply- 
ing glass tubes for original equipment. This recognition by set manufacturers 
means one thing . . . QUALITY. 

And in supplying the new metal tubes to the trade, Sylvania lives up to that 
reputation. That's why, whether you order metal tubes or glass tubes for 
replacement, specify Sylvanias! They are known for their tone fidelity and 
long life, and you will be satisfied, because your customers will be satisfied. 

Inquiries regarding tubes for original equipment or replacement will be 
promptly answered. Take no chances . . . carry Sylvania tubes and be ready 
to take care of your trade. 

Communicate with Hygrade Sylvania Corporation, Emporium, Pennsylvania, 
for FREE technical supplement on the new metal tubes. 

SYLVANIA 



THE SET-TESTED RADIO TUBE 



© 1935, Hygrade Sylv: 





A T O R S 



Tear out this ad and 
pin f© youpjmit&r- 
heod-faffWEcopy 

IfffiTNEW UTAH 
General Catalog of 
vitalized radio parts 



RADIO PRODUCTS CO., Orleans St., Chicago 



November, 1935 



31 



THESE SPLENDID BOOKS 

FREE! 




Think oT it! 2 books 
full of invaluable in- 
formation, to bo had 
for just the mailing 
costs! One with 20 
COMPLETE TRANS- 
MITTER DESIGNS 
including 12 tested transmitter RF section 
designs and 8 modulator and speech ampli- 
fier designs. TEN COMPLETE DESIGNS 
FOR PUBLIC ADDRESS AMPLIFIERS in 
the other book. Circuits, compute parts, 
specifications, inductances, etc., all included. 
These books should be in every amateur's 
library. Invaluable for reference. Just 22 cents 
in stamps brings you both. Send for them to-day! 

STANDARD 
TRANSFORMER 
CORPORATION 

856 Blackhawk Street, Chicaso, III. 



mnii this coupon! 



STANDARD TRANSFORMER CORPORATION 

Dept G — 856 Blackhawk St., Chicago, III. 
I am enclosing 12c for Transmitter Manual 
I am enclosing 10c for Amplifier Manual 

Name Address 

City State 



"The Most Complete Radio Parts Cata- 
log Ever Published!" 



M 



■For 14 years I have supplied the 
Radio Service Man with his Radio 
i Paris — every year the Radolek cat- 
alog has been the most complete 
published — Now I am offering you 
the largest and Finest Radio Parts 
Catalog of my entire career — Pre- 
vious editions of the RADOLEK 
PROFIT GUIDE were the best of | 
their kind — but this Big New Book i 
anH^for exceeds anything you've ever I 
'"seen — it's colossaf — gigantic — it's the "top" — Con- 
tains over 160 pages — 10,000 individual Radio I 
Repair Parts — hundreds of Special Items — Radio | 
Receivers — Amplifiers — Everything in Radio - 
always in slock, ready for prompt delivery to you I 
— at the right prices — You need this superb "Buying | 
Guide" — I want you to 
| have it — just send coupon 
-I'll mail it to you — Free. 



'S^ 



R A_D_0_LJE K 

THERADOLEKCO. MAI LTHIS COUPON ! 

652 W. Randolph St. Radolek restricts distribution of 
CHICAGO ILL * n ' s catalog to active and qual- 
ified Radio Men. Please enclose 
Fk a p* ■ your business card or letterhead 
D k b I with this and you'll receive your 
l\ b L ■ "spy of the RADOLEK PROFIT 
GUIDE. FREE. 



ADDRESS 

Service Man? □ Dealer? n Experimenter? n 



SERVICE NOTES-RIDER 



Stewart-Warner ferrodyne 
models 1381 to 1391 

* There are 11 tubes in 
these receivers; eight of them metal 
and three glass. The output tubes 
are 2A3s and the rectifier is an 83-V. 
These are the three glass tubes. The 
metal tubes are a r-f. amplifier, a 
combination mixer and oscillator, 
two i-f. amplifiers, a demodulator or 
2nd detector, an AVC control tube, 
a first stage a-f. amplifier and a 2nd 
a-f. stage. The output stage is the 
3rd a-f. stage. Tour bands are cov- 
ered, from 18 mc. to 140 kc. The 
i-f. peak is 456 kc. and the chassis 
model is B-138. A meter located in 
the plate circuit of the r-f. tube en- 
ables tuning to correct resonance. 

The first two i-f. transformers are 
two coil units, with a resistor across 
the primaries and another resistor 
across the secondary windings. By a 
combination of close coupling be- 
tween the windings and the presence 
of the shunt resistors, the required 
band width is secured in the i-f. sys- 
tem. The third i-f. transformer is 
another two winding unit, feeding 
into a full-wave demodulator. 



Audio compensation 

A bass and treble audio compensat- 
ing system is employed, between the 
1st and 2nd a-f. amplifier tubes. 
Variable bass and treble control is 
provided. The signal voltage for the 
AVC tube is secured through a 
.00026-mfd. condenser, from the plate 
circuit of the 2nd i-f. tube. Just to 
make you feel good, a total of 20 
trimmers are used in the receiver. 
Shunt feed voltage supply is used for 
the oscillator system and two winding 
oscillation transformers are used on 
two of the bands, and single, tapped- 
winding oscillation transformers are 
used on the other two tuning bands. 
These single-winding oscillation 
transformers resemble the system nor- 
mally understood to be a Hartley os- 
cillator with shunt feed. 



Station hiss 

The rated a-f. response is up to 
13,000 cycles. Because of this high 
audio response, station hiss may be 
pronounced. The following infor- 
mation concerning the elimination of 
such noises is furnished by the manu- 
facturer of the receiver. Bemove the 



32 



four nuts holding the tone compen- 
sator assembly can to the chassis. 
You will note four wires protruding 
from this can. Cut the green lead 
about an inch from the can and tap 
the bare end so as to avoid possible 
shorts to the can. Bemove the re- 
maining green lead from the grid of 
the 6C5. Connect a 0.1-mfd., 400- 
volt condenser, part Wo. 83440, to the 
same grid terminal. You can get this 
condenser into place best, if you point 
it to the front of the set and place it 
very close to the socket. Now con- 
nect a 6-inch lead to the plate termi- 
nal of the 6J7 tube socket. This 
socket is the corner one, and the plate 
terminal has a yellow wire connected 
to it, which runs to the tone com- 
pensator can. Now replace the tone 
compensator can. 

You now have one end of the con- 
denser and one end of the lead wire 
coming from the plate of the 6J7, 
still to be connected. These should 
both be soldered to the yellow and 
green wire coming from the tone 
compensator unit. The best way of 
making this connection is to strip 
away a small amount of the insula- 
tion at a convenient point along the 
yellow and green lead and solder the 
three wires together. 

After this change has been made, 
crackling and station hiss will be 
eliminated. However, the treble con- 
trol will not have the same effect as 
before. 

Expense vs. income 

* Statistics indicate that 
servicemen operating recognized serv- 
icing establishments, that is, stores 
all over the United States, operate 
at an expense which amounts to from 
31 to about 40 per cent of their total 
income. Becognizing the low pre- 
vailing servicing charges and the defi- 
nitely limited prices which may be 
charged for replacement parts and 
the fixed cost for this merchandise, 
the expense figures are extremely 
high. Since these expense figures in- 
clude the salary of the owner, which 
invariably is less than $1,500 per 
year, the only possible means of im- 
proving the ratio between expense 
and income is to raise the income. 
Since a man can only work a definite 
number of hours each day, that is, 
if he is to live like a human being, 
the only means of rectifying the 
situation is to raise service charges. 
How about you ? Considering the 1 

Radio Today 




''YOU CAN'T GO WRONG 
WITH A RIDER MANUAL" 

VOLUME VI HAS . . . 

• DOUBLE PAGE SIZE SCHEMATICS 

So that complicated diagrams can 
be easily read. 

• PRODUCTS OF OVER 115 
MANUFACTURERS 

So you mill have maximum coverage. 

• DATA ON NEW METAL, GLASS, AND 
GLASS-METAL TUBE SETS 

So you mill know about the latest. 

• 90-PAGE INDEX COVERING 6 VOLUMES 

So you can find anything FAST 



• 1250 PAGES 

More than ever before. 



• S7.50 

The same. 



. SEE IT AT YOUR JOBBERS' , 
LATE IN NOVEMBER 



John F. Rider, Publisher Ncwyo?k°N.y v 



1 440 Broadway 



CajKuUtote 




WET 

DRY 

PAPER 

MICA 

TRIMMER 









WHEN IN NEED OF 
GOOD CONDENSERS- 
SPECIFY THE BEST 

Literature on request 

SOLAR MFG. CORP. 

599-601 Broadway 
New York City 



type of business involved, proper 
financial planning and operation calls 
for an expense not greater than about 
25 per cent of the total income. Are 
you in line ? ... If not, find out why ! 

Recewer alignment 

* The first gun has been 
fired in the visual alignment of radio 
receivers. The service bulletin issued 
by RCA-Victor, covering the 1936 
line of receivers, shows the response 
curves for the i-f. systems. Up to this 
time no receiver manufacturer has re- 
leased response curves which could be 
used as the basis of comparison. Now 
that one manufacturer has released 
such curves, more will follow. 

It is interesting to note that these 
curves are divided into three groups. 
We are referring in particular to 
the i-f. response curves for the model 
C-15-3 receiver. Three i-f. trans- 
formers are used. A separate curve 
is shown for the 3rd i-f. transformer, 
which indicates that this is the first 
unit aligned. The second curve is 
that for the combined operation of 
the 2nd and 3rd i-f. transformers and 
the third curve is that of the com- 
bined operation of the three i-f. trans- 
formers. Identification of these i-f. 
transformers is reading from the 
mixer stage to the demodulator stage. 
In other words, the transformer bear- 
ing the highest number is the one 
farthest from the mixer tube and 
closest to the demodulator tube. This 
should be the routine of alignment. 

While the problem of alignment is 
not one of great moment in the 
smaller receivers, it is of importance 
in high fidelity receivers and in the 
very sensitive systems being offered 
to the public. The connection of the 
associated apparatus to the i-f. am- 
plifier invariably increases the amount 
of regeneration in the system, with 
the result that, when critical align- 
ment is made with meter type indi- 
cators, the proper frequency band 
pass is not secured. Since the tone 
quality of the receiver is markedly 
influenced by the band pass in the 
i-f. amplifier, it is important that 
band pass, as well the peak frequency 
adjustment, be correct. Considering 
the time involved, visual alignment 
is so far superior to meter type of 
alignment that a comparison is not 
fair. 



Three men pass 

* The Service Manager 
of a well-known concern was recently 
in need of a number of service men. 
Ninety-six men applied for the job 




INSURANCE 
EVERY 

C-D CONDENSER 

TtM OXEY cannot buy back time 
IrM. that is lost. Arid time is 
opportunity. Therefore, why not 
insure your sponsors' time on 
the air? Today, one thinks in 
terms of time insurance — insur- 
ance against costly breakdowns 
and delays resulting from inter- 
rupted operations. 
• To assure our many customers of the 
utmost in condenser value, we pledge 
our continued unremitting efforts to 
maintain the high de- 
P^ gree of excellence 
which is part of all 

CORNELL-DUBILIER 
MICA -OIL -PAPER 
ELECTROLYTIC 
CONDENSERS 

Engineering Catalog No. 127 
now available. 



CORNELL-DUBILIER 

CORPORATION 

4360 BRONX BOULEVARD 
NEW YORK 





ffof off f he QrM/e 



re 

SERVICE men know how fool- 
ish it is to risk losing a satisfied 
customer by installing inferior re- 
placement parts. They know the 
dependability and profit of Ward 
Leonard resistors. This new bul- 
letin 507A lists the Ward Leonard 
line and gives prices. Send today 
... it helps to keep old custom- 
ers happy. 

WARD LEONARD 

Protective Magnetic Relays 



WARD LEONARD ELECTRIC 


CO. 


South Street, Mount Vernon, X 


Y. 


Please send Bulletin 507A. 








Street - 


City State 






RT 



November, 1935 



33 



SERVICING — RIDER 



and were examined. Three men 
passed. Two of these with flying col- 
ors, and one just got under the wire. 

Those who passed are not of much 
interest. — The reasons why the other 
93 did not pass are of far greater im- 
portance. — Frankly, we do not know 
if it is tragic or funny. But, accord- 
ing to the Service Manager, the 93 
men who "flunked" knew very little, 
if anything, about the ramifications 
of automatic-volume-control circuits 
and noise-silencing circuits. In view 
of the fact that the receivers sold by 
this organization are rampant with 
various types of peculiar AVC — "Q" 
and tuning meter systems, the S. M. 
felt that knowledge of this type was 
extremely vital to the man whom he 
would send out on service calls. Con- 
sequently, a great deal of weight was 
placed upon what knowledge was 
shown concerning such systems. 

Perhaps AVC circuits are too com- 
plicated. That, however, does not ex- 
cuse the fact that not more than 
about five men out of the 93 who 
failed were able to draw a circuit of 
a full-wave power pack using a type 
80 rectifier. The question did not call 



for designation of electrical values. 
. . . All that was wanted was an indi- 
cation of the fact that the man knew 
the polarity of voltages in such a sys- 
tem and the manner in which the va- 
rious parts were connected. — ■ Sev- 
eral men showed a grid as one of the 
elements in a type 80 rectifier! Ex- 
plain that if you please ! 

Harmonics 

Harmonics have been a vexing 
problem in connection with super- 
heterodyne servicing, so — a question 
was asked which covered the subject 
in a simple manner. The question 
was to state four harmonics of 2,000 
kilocycles. About half of the men 
stated four multiples as being four 
harmonics, but even a number of these 
men identified the 4,000 kilocycle sig- 
nal as being the first harmonic. — The 
balance, according to what we have 
been told, did not even know what a 
harmonic was ! 

The fourth question asked was if 
it was possible to align a receiver 
tuned to 9,000 kilocycles with an oscil- 
later which had a range of from 150 
kc. to 3,500 kc. Maybe you will be- 



Radio equipment facilities of the 
1936 automobiles. 

Make of 
Built-in Radio 

Car Antenna (Opt.Eqpt.) 

Auburn Yes Crosley 

Buick No General Motors 

Cadillac No General Motors 

Chevrolet No General Motors 

Chrysler Yes Philco 

Cord Yes Crosley 

DeSoto Yes Philco 

Dodge Yes Philco 

Ford Yes Philco 

Graham Yes Crosley 

Hudson Yes RCA-Victor 

Custom 8 — radio is 
standard equipment 

Hupmobile Yes Philco 
LaFayette Yes* Philco 
LaSalle No General Motors 

Nash Yes* Philco 

Packard 120 Yes 

Radio is standard equipment 
with other models. 



Oldsmobile No 

Pierce Arrow Yes 

Plymouth 

Pontiac 

Reo 

Studebaker 



General Motors 



Yes Philco 

No General Motors 

Yes Philco 

Yes 



*Ante.nna with higher-price 
models. 

All General Motors cars have 
steel roofs, necessitating use of 
running board antenna. 

Open and convertible coupe mod- 
els have no built-in antenna. 



HOWARD 
WO RLD SEVEN 

WITH ALL ME TAIL TUBES 

\ N outstanding receiver of tra- 
" ditional Howard quality at an 
exceptional price. The World 

Seven is one of the finest chassis 
ever built at the Howard plant, 
where quality is always the first 
consideration. 

Designed especially for the new 
All Metal Tubes. Complete All 
Wave Uniform sensitivity on all 
bands. Automatic Volume Control. 
Tone Control. Illuminated Air- 
plane Dial. Three Gang Variable 
Condenser floated on rubber. The 
same bakelite cored coils used in 
the magnificent 19 tube Howard 
Grand. Heavy eight and ten inch 
Dynamic Speakers. These precision 
engineered chassis are mounted in 
Table and Console Cabinets of typ- 
ical Howard beauty of design, with 
matched V panels and hand rubbed 
finish. Priced to retail at $64.50 
and $79.50 respectively. 

Tear out this ad and send in 
with your letterhead for complete 
details. 

it pays to sell HOWARD QUALITY 

HOWARD 

RADIO COMPANY I 




Also a superb 9- tube Howard 
Junior Grand in table and console 
style outstanding for performance 
and beauty. The Howard line in- 
cludes seven other models from 4- 
tube AC-DC to 19-tube Howard 
Grand to suit every pocketbook. 



/ MUll ER Interferes 




Belmont Avenue 
"AMERICA'S OLDEST 



Chicago, Illinois 
RADIO MANUFACTURER" 



an Made 
Interference/ 

Traffic Cop" of 
Radio absolutely elimi- 
nates the man-made interference that 
comes in over the power line by merely 
attaching the Filter directly to the set itself. 
Sell these filters with confidence and guarantee 
their operation, because they will do the job. 
There's a real need for them. 
Ask your jobber or take advantage of our trial offer. 

MAIL THIS COUPON 

Dept. T-ll ^ 



THE MUTER COMPANY 
1255 South Michigan Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 

Please ship me one Muter Interference 
Filter at your trial offer of $1.80 ($3-00 list, 
less 40%J. □ I am enclosing $1.80 □ Ship it C. O. D. for $1.80. 

Name 



Address_ 
City 



34 



Radio Today 



lieve it and maybe you will not — 
but it's true nevertheless that of the 
fifty percent of the men who answered 
the harmonic question, some could not 
describe the alignment of this re- 
ceiver with the oscillator mentioned. 

Oscillator trimmer 

The fifth question asked, referred 
to adjustment of an oscillator trim- 
mer at 1,500 kc. Were there any 
peaks at this setting — how many, and 
which were used. 

How many of these questions can 
you answer without referring to a 
text? Frankly, these questions as they 
stand are not really difficult when 
compared with the state of modern 
radio receiver development; and it is 
our belief that the relation between 
those who passed and those who 
"flunked" should have been reversed. 

What is wrong with the picture? — 
Is it possible that service men do not 
really know the answers to these ques- 
tions ? — Is it possible that the service 
manager examined men who were 
practical workers and who had not 
studied the technical side of radio? — 
Such a thing is conceivable, but not 
very probable. — Is it possible that 
these men studied radio theory and 
forgot what they learned? 

8-hole sockets to 
be standard 

* Quite a furor has been 
raised by the fact that some set man- 
ufacturers making metal tube sets 
have apparently disregarded the ad- 
vantages gained by standardizing 
upon an 8-hole socket to accommodate 
the metal tubes. Instrument men 
with mathematical inclinations have 
computed that there are 261 different 
combinations of adaptor-socket ar- 
rangements required to accommo- 
date all the possible pin arrangements. 
Naturally, service men have taken 
fright at the possibility of the expense 
required to secure these adaptors. As 
a matter of fact, there has been much 
talk concerning the adaptors which 
will be needed to accommodate the 
present testers to the metal tube 
chassis. 

From what has been learned, the 
set manufacturers who are using 
sockets with just enough holes to ac- 
commodate the proper number of 
prongs, as found upon the tube base, 
realize the servicing problem, and it 
is rumored that when the present sea- 
son's supply of sockets required for 
the production of sets is exhausted, 
the regulation 8-hole socket will be 
used. In the meantime, replacement 
sockets sold to the servicing field by 
these manufacturers will be 8-holers. 



There is a solution 

Really — the picture is not as black 
as it may have appeared at first 
glance. Of course, it would have been 
quite damaging if all of the manu- 
facturers had deviated from the 8-hole 
socket; but since it is only a few, and 
since these receivers will not be com- 
ing in for service for quite some time, 
there is a solution. This solution is 
the use of a pair of testing leads and 
a meter for determining voltage and 
resistance or current — instead of the 
usual plug arrangement. Perhaps 
this is an inconvenience — but after 



all, when these receivers come in for 
service they will be interspersed 
among a far greater number of those 
which enable the normal application 
of the plug arrangement. 

As a matter of fact, an examination 
of service notes which will be released 
during the forthcoming year shows 
that a great number of manufacturers 
identify the voltage existing between 
the tube element at the socket, and 
ground, so that the few cases where 
the normal routine plug arrangement 
cannot be used will not involve ex- 
tensive complications. 




This ad pinned to 
your letterhead 
will bring you 
complete data on 
the great Baldwin 
line of Replace- 
ment Speakers. 



3NS0LIDATED 



MDIO PRODUCTS CO.. 36! W 

200 BROAUWAY. NEW YORK. N. 



m 



ERIOR ST., CHICAGO 




9$r& \ 

SENSATIONAL 
ACHIEVEMENT 




rAVTHEon 

METAL TUBES 



RAYTHEON PRODUCTION CORP., DeptT11,30 E. 42nd St., New York, N.Y. 

Please send me items checked : 

TUBE DATA CHART— 8th EDITION— free 

"33 DEALS" BROADSIDE (illustrated) free 



METAL TUBE DISPLAY (illustrated above) free_ 
TUBE TALKS (Tube Complements) 50c enclosed- 
Name Address 



November, 1935 



35 



Clnetkel much -needed service 

tendeled only fcu Kadio \aba\i 

WHO'S WHO 



an 



a WHERE to BUY 



— a DIRECTORY o\ tke RADIO INDUSTRY 



Complete list of manufacturers of receivers, with names of companies, addresses and brand names. 

Complete list of brand names, with names and addresses of manufacturers. 

Complete list of tube manufacturers, with names, addresses and brand names. 

Complete list of tube brand-names, with manufacturers' names and addresses. 

List of parts manufacturers, with names, addresses and a key showing the various kinds of parts made by them. 

Parts classifications, showing names and addresses of manufacturers producing parts of certain kinds. 

List of manufacturers of loud speakers, equipment, accessories, etc. 

Complete list of broadcasters, with names, addresses and station call-letters. 

List of manufacturers of phonograph records. 



How often YOU have needed, quickly, a name, an address or a list of one or more divisions of the industry! 
And what a time you had finding exactly what you needed! 

Radio has always needed a convenient and reliable directory — a handy reference work to answer the frequent 
questions that come up in the day's work of the busy radio man, whether he is a dealer, service man, jobber, 
manufacturer, purchasing agent, engineer or broadcaster. 

In a spirit of service, RADIO TODAY now meets this need. 



"Who's Who and Where to Buy" is not a separate 
publication — not sold at an added cost. It is to be 
published in the regular monthly issue of RADIO 
TODAY, in December, for the benefit of all readers 
of the magazine in all parts of the industry. 



New subscriptions to RADIO TODAY can be 
entered so as to begin with the December issue, if 
sent in at once. ONE DOLLAR will bring you 
twelve (12) monthly issues, including the Directory, 
if you act promptly. 



RADIO 
TODAY 



CALD WELL-CLEMENTS, Inc., 480 Lexington Ave., New York, N. y. U.S.A. 



36 



Radio Today 



NEW THINGS FROM THE MANUFACTURERS 



HIGH-FIDELITY CONSOLE 

* Ten metal tube console 
— shadow tuning — dual-speed, rubber- 
drive vernier dial. Selectivity-fidelity 
control. All wave— 540 to 18,000 kc. 
Full vision dial — one scale at a time. 
Mechanism controlled by band switch. 
Dual-section tuning condensers for 
easy tuning on low waves. Overspaced 
oscillator condenser. Modern type 
walnut cabinet. Model 810G — list $149. 
Atwater Kent Mfg. Co., 4700 Wissa- 
hickon Ave., Philadelphia, Penna. — 
Radio Today 



LINE FILTER 




+ Line filter of inductive- 
capacitive type for receivers. Filters 
noise from power lines. Efficient on 
all waves. Duo-lateral chokes and oil- 
impregnated paper condensers. Com- 
pact metal case. Ground wire re- 
quired. List price $4. J. W. Miller 
Co., 5917 So. Main St., Los Angeles. 
Calif. — Radio Today 

AUTOMOBILE DI-POLE ANTENNA 

+ Di-pole antenna for 
autos — mounts under either running 
board. U-shaped 8-foot steel tube. 
Adjustable brackets. Broadly resonant 
at 7 meters — balances out large part 
of ignition noise. Special crackle fin- 
ish and wax impregnation for weather- 
proofing. List $2.60. RCA Manufac- 
turing Co., Camden, N. J. — Radio To- 
day 

IRON-CORE I. F. TRANSFORMERS 




+ Intermediate frequency 
transformers using Polyiron core — 
compound of extremely small iron 
particles moulded with an insulating 
material. Coils extremely small — 



half size of air core coil — high Q and 
low distributed capacity. Dual mica 
insulated trimmer — 456 kc. Suitable 
for use with metal tubes and in auto 
receivers. Aladdin Radio Industries, 
466 W. Superior St., Chicago, 111. — 
Radio Today 



HEADPHONE AND ADAPTER KIT 

■* Adapter and headphones 
— permits use of set without loud- 
speaker. Designed for short-wave 
fans, dx listeners, invalids, hard-of- 
hearing. Adapter inserted in tube 
socket of any radio — speaker auto- 
matically disconnected while phones 
are in use. No wires disturbed. Light- 
weight phones. List $7.50. Philco 
Radio and Television Corp., Philadel- 
phia, Penna. — Radio Today 



THREE-BAND ALL-WAVE 
RECEIVER 



BATTERY CONSOLE 




* Seven-tube superhetero- 
dyne — metal and glass tubes. Aver- 
age sensitivity of 1% microvolts over 
all three bands— 535 to 18,000 kc. 
New mixer modulation for low noise 
level. Automatic volume control — me- 
chanical band spread. Resistance 
coupled audio stage and wide-range 
speaker. Condensers and resistors 
RMA designated. Model 777— list 
$74.50. Belmont Radio Corp., 1257 
Fullerton Ave., Chicago, 111. — Radio 
Today 

MAGNETO-INDUCTION PICK-UP 




* Compact pick-up for 
use in portable ard midget combina- 
tions — exceptionally flat and light- 
weight. Magneto-induction type un- 
affected by temperature and hu- 
midity. Quality reproduction ob- 
tained. Audax Model 100 — list 
$9.50 Audak Co., 500 Fifth Ave., 
New York City — Radio Today 




it All-wave battery console, 
range 15-550 meters. R.F. stage on all 
bands — automatic volume control. 
Eight-inch permanent magnet dynamic- 
speaker — tone control. Dual ratio tun- 
ing control and airplane dial. Class B 
audio output for battery economy. 
Seven glass tubes. Heavy inlaid burl 
walnut cabinet. Model 74BC. Troy 
Radio Mfg. Co., 1142 So. Olive St., Los 
Angeles, Calif. — Radio Today 

TAP SWITCHES 

■* All - porcelain tap 

switches. Four to twelve taps in- 
shorting or non-shorting types. High 
voltages and high frequencies handled 
without breakdown. Insulated shaft 
withstands several thousand volts. 
Special silver contact shoe — low resis- 
tance. Eight-point unit — 2% in. diam- 
eter — list price $5.75. Ohmite Mfg. 
Co., 636 N. Albany Ave., Chicago, 111. — 
Radio Today 

ROUND THE WORLD SUPER 




* Eleven-tube all-wave fer- 
rodyne console. Non-adjustable high 
fidelity. Curvilinear dynamic speaker 
for additional octave of response. Sepa- 
rate bass and treble tone control. 
Shadow type tuning meter — multi- 
color illuminated airplane type dial 
with dual speed vernier. Dual line 
filter. Hand-rubbed acoustically de- 
signed cabinet. Model 1385 — list 
$144.50. Stewart-Warner Corp., 1836 
Diversey Pkwy., Chicago, 111. — Radio 
Today 



November, 1935 



37 



HIGH-FREQUENCY TUBE 




* Transmitting tube de- 
signed especially for use above 60 
megacycles. Low interelectrode ca- 
pacitances — high voltage insulation. 
High efficiency obtained — high mu 
and high transconductance. Graphite 
plate. Plate dissipation — HF-300, 200 
watts; HF-200, 150 watts. List — HF- 
300, ?50; HF-200, $24.50. Amperex 
Electronic Products, Inc., 79 Wash- 
ington St., Brooklyn, N. Y. — Radio 
Todat. 

ALL- WAVE ANTENNA 

* Factory assembled an- 
tenna for all-wave use — requires only 
a 60-foot span. Noises usually picked 
up by lead-in wire eliminated by 
twisted transmission line. Correct an- 
tenna length and coupling transformer 
design give maximum pick-up of sig- 
nals on short wave and broadcast. 
Low-loss insulators, 75-foot transmis- 
sion line, dual lightning arrester 
supplied. Model 3 — list $7. Stromberg- 
Carlson Telephone Mfg. Co., Rochester, 
N. Y. — Radio Today. 

NOISE ELIMINATORS 




* Filters to eliminate 
man-made static. Two types for use 
between receiver and line. Five mod- 
els for use at source of interference. 
Line filters designed to carry 5 am- 
peres — capacitive-inductive and capaci- 
tive types. Useful with small motors, 
vibrators, neon signs, oil burners, etc. 
List §.40 to $1.50. Continental Carbon 
Co., Inc., 13900 Lorain Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio — Radio Today 

INTERFERENCE FILTER 




fastened and grounded to face plate by 
two screws. Integral receptacle takes 
attachment plug of receiver. May be 
used to isolate noise producing device 
from line. Aerovox Corp., Brooklyn, 
N. Y.— Radio Today. 

PORTABLE TEST UNITS 




* Compact, lightweight, 
portable volt-ohmmeters and test units 
employing rugged d'Arsonval move- 
ment with range-selector switches. 
Scale length of 2.4 in. Accuracy within 
2% for DC. volts and milliamperes, 
and within 5% for AC. Mounted in 
sturdy moldarta case 7x4x3% inches. 
Model PM-32 AC-DC unit illustrated. 
Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., 
East Pittsburgh, Penna. — Radio Today 

CERAMIC CASED RESISTOR 




* Condenser-type line fil- 
ter. Square metal case with plug 
prongs fitting electric outlet. Case 



* Solid molded carbon re- 
sistor enclosed in ceramic insulating 
case — positive over-all insulation. 
Tinned wire leads brought out from 
ends. Color coded according to RMA 
— color bands encircle shell. Will 
safely carry overload of 100 per cent. 
Available in % (illustrated) and % 
watt sizes — resistance values from a 
few ohms to several megohms. Erie 
Resistor Corp., Erie, Penna. — Radio 
Today 

UNIT CONSTRUCTION, HI FT 

* Metal tube superhetero- 
dyne. "Variable high fidelity— 3500 to 
7500 cycles. Shadowgraph tuning 
meter — dual-speed tuning — individ- 
ually-lighted tuning arrow. Meter off 
in hi-fi position — assures correct 
tuning with normal fidelity. Range 
550-18,500 and 150-350 kc. Centro- 
matic unit construction. Model 595P 
— list $139.50. United American Bosch 
Corp., Springfield, Mass. — Radio To- 



LOW-COST HIGH-FIDELITY 

+ U 1 1 r a-sensitive all- 
wave high-fidelity superhet — 140 to 
18,0 00 kc. Split-second, full-vision, 
dual-ratio tuning — variable tone con- 
trol. Output of 15 watts — Class A 
'45's. R.F. stage on all bands — au- 



tomatic volume control. Adapted for 
all types antennas. Duo-tone semi- 
modern American walnut table cab- 
inet. AC operation — 8 glass tubes. 
DeWald model 805A — list $75. 
Pierce Airo, Inc., 510 Sixth Ave., 
New York City — Radio Today 



RESISTOR CHEST 
INSULATED RESISTOR 




* Fibre-board chest sup- 
plied free with purchase of kit of 56 
IRC 1-watt insulated resistors — a met- 
allized resistor with high-voltage in- 
sulation. Sealed against moisture — 
crack-proof and break-proof. Ex- 
tremely small — tinned flexible leads 
moulded to ends. Vibration-proof and 
permanent. Color coded and marked 
— 100 ohms to 10 megohms. List — 
1 watt $.25, Vz watt $.20. International 
Resistance Co., 2100 Arch St., Phila- 
delphia, Penna. — Radio Today 

FOREIGN SHORT-WAVE AND 
BROADCAST SUPERHETERODYNE 




* Dual-band table model, 
super — six tubes. Ranges — 550 to 
1,500, 5,500 to 15,700 kc. Full-vision 
dial printed in colors. Tone control, 
automatic overload control, and slow 
motion tuning. AC models — glass or 
metal tubes. AC-DC models — glass, 
or metal and glass. Hand polished 
walnut veneer cabinet. Freed-Eisemann 
model T-367-S. Freed Mfg. Co., 44 
West 18th St., New York City. — Radio 
Today 

BROADCAST SWITCHING PANEL 

* Selective switching unit. 
Any four of six amplifier channel out- 
puts may be connected to four out- 
going circuits. Used with multi-chan- 
nel and key station studio speech 



38 



Radio Today 



equipment. Duplicate selector keys 
for pre-assignment of channels for 
following program. Single master 
change-over key operates control and 
indicator circuits. Model 271A — West- 
ern Electric Co., 195 Broadway, New 
York City — Radio Today 



OVERLOAD CIRCUIT BREAKER 

* Circuit breaker for resi- 
dential use. Outlet box mounting — 
125-volt AC or DC circuit. Eliminates 
inconvenience of blown fuses — gives 
positive protection to radio. Sealed-in, 
rust-proof mechanism. Can be used 
as switch control — impossible to close 
circuit while overloaded. Ideal for 
protecting transmitters. Listed by 
Underwriter's Laboratories. General 
Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. — 
Radio Today 



MODERNISTIC TABLE COMPACT 




* AC-DC superheterodyne 
in striking modern design — walnut 
veneers. Six tubes including ballast 
tube— range, 550-1,600 and 1,620- 
4,280 kc. Dual-gang ball bearing con- 
denser with illuminated full-vision 
dial. Five-inch dynamic speaker and 
rust-proof chassis. Shielded i.f. trans- 
formers — impregnated coils — isolan- 
tite trimming condensers. Kadette 66 
— list $19.95. International Radio 
Corp., Ann Arbor, Mich. — Radio Today 



LOW-COST TEST OSCILLATOR 




* Signal generator with 
90 to 20,000 kc. range — six bands cali- 
brated on 8-inch open-faced dial. 
Ladder-type attenuator with inter- 
polating control — accurate calibration 
of output ratios for sensitivity tests. 
Modulated or unmodulated r.f. output 
— 400-cycle audio output for checking 
audio systems. Model 82 — net $19.90. 
Clough-Brengle Co., 1134 W. Austin 
Ave., Chicago, 111. — Radio Today 



ADJUSTABLE RESISTANCE BOX 

* Low-cost adjustable re- 
sistance box of the decade type for 
laboratory or shop use. Accurate 
within V z of one per cent and ex- 
tremely rugged. Four types available, 
each of different resistance value. 
Combination of two will give resis- 
tances from 0.1 to 111,111 in 0.1 ohm 
steps. Muter Resistance Co.. 1255 So. 
Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. — Radio 
Today 



SKIP-BAND SUPERHETERODYNE 



I 


: m 





■k Six metal-tube superhet. 
Dual wave — 540 to 1800 and 5400 to 
18,000 kc. Slide rule tuning with au- 
tomatic vernier — one scale visible at 
a time. Stabilized 8-inch dynamic 
speaker with hum bucking coil. Auto- 
matic volume control — tone control. 
Undistorted output of 2 watts. Mod- 
ified modern cabinet design of hand- 
rubbed walnut. Model A-64. General 
Electric Co., Bridgeport, Conn. — Radio 
Today 

24-TUBE SUPERHET 

■*• All-wave superhetero- 
dyne with variable band-width and 
cathode-ray tuning. Thirteen metal 
tubes and 11 glass provide output of 
50 watts to dual speakers. Dual-speed 
tuning with open-faced dial. Auto- 
matic tone and volume control. Radio 
frequency pre-amplifler on all bands — 
range 140 to 30,000 kc. Lafayette 
model C-95— net $115. Wholesale 
Radio Service Co., 100 Sixth Ave., 
New York City — Radio Today 

ACETATE RECORDING DISK 

* Chemically-coated ace- 
tate disc for instantaneous recording. 
Disc is soft enough to be cut, yet hard 
enough to be reproduced with steel 
needles. Texture and hardness such 
that up to 6,500 cycles has been re- 
corded using lateral cutters — up to 
9,000 cycles with vertical cutters. 
Surface noise below that of standard 
shellac records. Available in various 
sizes for processing or instantaneous 
recording. Presto Recording Corp., 
139 West 19th St., New York City— 
Radio Today 



CATHODE RAY OSCILLOGRAPH 

* Portable cathode ray 
oscillograph — 5-inch screen with cali- 
brated scale. Amplifiers used singly 
or in cascade. Sensitivity — 0.2 volt 
per inch deflection with cascaded am- 
plifiers. Sweep circuit from 10 to 



100,000 cycles. Improved linearity — 
current limiting and mercury vapor 
discharge tubes. All controls on front 
panel. Self-contained operation from 
110 AC. Allen B. DuMont Labs., 524 
Valley Rd., Upper Montclair, N J. — 
Radio Today 



LOAY-LOSS CERAMIC SOCKET 




* Steatite socket for low 
losses. High mechanical strength — 
metal adapter plate takes strain of 
mounting rivets. Ceramic portion held 
by spring without strain. Mounts in 
usual wafer-type socket hole. High 
dielectric strength, low power factor, 
and high electrical resistivity. Suit- 
able for short-wave receivers and 
transmitters. Available in 4 to 8 con- 
tact types. American Phenolic Corp., 
500 S. Throop St., Chicago, 111 — 
Radio Today 



SIGNAL BEACON TUNING 

*• All-wave receiver with 
variable fidelity — i.f. coupling changed. 
Dual audio channel — 3 watts to 2 high 
frequency speakers, 12 watts to me- 
dium and low register speaker — 12 
metal tubes. Signal beacon tuning. 
Range — 540 to 18,000 and 150 to 400 
kc. Aladdin colorflash dial indicates 
band in use. Headphone jack — cuts 
out loudspeaker. Hand-rubbed stream- 
line cabinet. Grunow — model 1241 — 
list $167.50. General Household Util- 
ities Co., Chicago, 111. — Radio Today 



METAL-TUBE RECEIVERS 




■*■ A line of AC receivers 
employing metal tubes is being manu- 
factured by Fairbanks-Morse Home 
Appliances, Inc., of 430 S. Green St., 
Chicago. Sets embody features in- 
corporated in and supersede some of 
the glass-tube line announced earlier. 
Consequent with an increase in tube 
complement, the prices are somewhat 
higher. All-wave and skip-band 
models in console and table styles 
available. A line of 6-volt farm 
radios also has been added. — Radio 
Today 



November, 1935 



39 




"QUIET" ... is the insistent de- 
mand of millions who today own 
all-wave receiving sets. Give them 
what they want, by installing 



©1MJMIT€R 



ALL- WAVE ANTENNA • 



This remarkable unit, A.A.K. pat- 
ented and engineered with tradi- 
tional CORWICO thoroughness, is 
actually AUTOMATIC electrically 
— no adjustment is needed and no 
manual operation is required, once 
"NOISE-MASTER" is properly 
installed. 

FOR EVERY SET AMD 
LOCATION 

"NOISE-MASTER" picks up and clari- 
fies feeble oversea signals, straining 
out the "man-made" static, that some- 
times seems to make radio a curse 
instead of a blessing. Minimizing the 
noises caused by household appliances 
near the set, "NOISE-MASTER" im- 
proves broadcast as well as shortwave 
reception. It successfully operates 
more than one set from a single aerial. 
We guarantee that "NOISE-MASTER" 
will eliminate noise when properly in- 
stalled, and urge you to recommend it 
at every opportunity. 



CAT. 
LIST 



No. 14 
PRICE 



'6 



,75 




Send for latest complete literature describing this 
and other up-to-the-minute antenna units 

CORNISH WIRE CO., Inc. 
3© Church St. New York City 



SALE STIMULATORS 



HOW TO CHOOSE A RADIO 

* New booklet by Strom- 
berg-Carlson begins: "When artists are 
pouring their talent into a studio 
microphone — when the air is alive 
with priceless entertainment, yours at 
a turn of the dial — surely it is worth 
while to give careful consideration to 
the choice of a radio for your home." 
Conveniently sized, the 12-page 
booklet dramatically covers impor- 
tant aspects of good reception. It is 
being mailed to those replying to 
Stromberg's national ads, and is be- 
ing distributed by the company's 
dealers throughout the country. 



DISCS FOR DEALERS 

■*• The electrically tran- 
scribed 15-minute programs titled 
"All-Star Radio Round-Up" which 
Stewart-Warner has made available 
to dealers and distributors without 
cost, has already been spotted on 
nearly 100 stations. Program is varied 
and uses topflight radio stars through- 
out. Ample time has been provided 
for the dealer's local announcement, 
featuring his name, address, terms, 
demonstrations, trade-in allowances, 
special offers, etc. Company supplies 
a prospectus outlining the whole af- 
fair: how to select a station, time to 
broadcast, and allied matters. 



FARMER'S SPECIAL 

* Turning to vigorous pro- 
motion of farm sets, RCA Mfg. Co. of 
Camden, N. J., is offering to dealers 
a 32-page booklet titled "Farm Radio 
Almanac and Log Book," along with 
mailing cards which prospects may 



use to get the logs free. Offer includes 
an electric sign for the store or win- 
dow plugging battery sets, and the 3 
items may be had at a nominal cost 
(200 logs and 400 cards). 

Almanac contains a complete 
monthly astronomical calendar, tem- 
perature and rainfall data for 68 cities 
of the United States, a section on the 
growth of radio art, a log of foreign 
and domestic stations, and miscellany 
of interest to farmers. 



NEW SERVICE KITS 




+ Problem of handling vol- 
ume control replacements for most of 
the well-known receivers has been met 
by the Clarostat Mfg. Co., Inc., 285 N. 
6th St., Brooklyn, New York. Company 
has just issued a neat and inexpensive 
kit for servicemen, in two types, both 
with 5 volume controls, 3 power 
switches and 5 flexible resistors. One 
type uses controls of composition, the 
other wire-wound ; all are selected to 
serve the greatest variety of popular 
sets. The resistors come with the 
kits, free of charge. 



MIRRORS AND A MOTOR 

• First-rate 
"mirrored window fea- 
ture" now available 
from Emerson distrib- 
utors or factory at 111 
Eighth Ave., New York 
City. This exceptional 
exhibit is a combina- 
tion of hard wood, 
chrome metal trim. 
Background is cream 
lacquered plyboard, on 
which two mirrors are 
arranged so that the 
rear grille of the 
"Duo-Tone" models 
are reflected. Contrast- 
ing colors and gold are 
used in the lettering, 
and the base is straight 
gold finish. 

As a separate item 
Emerson is also offer- 
ing a motor turntable 
display for the "Duo- 
Tone" models. This at- 
tractive device is ideal 
for showing the iden- 
tical front and rear 
grille of the sets. 



-<«s Aftrtsr liv 



>-0/. 



*Emerson 



%.. 




40 



Radio Today 



ENGINEERING 



KenRad 

RadioTubes 

DEPENDABLE LONG LIFE 



First-class engineering 
methods used. Write for 
complete information. 



Glass or Metal 
Radio Tubes 



THE KENRAD CORPORATION 

Incorporated 

Division of 

The Ken - Rad Tube and Lamp Corp. 
OWENSBORO, KY. 

Also Mfrs. of 

Ken - Rad Incandescent Electric Lamps 



MODERNIZATION STUNT 

* Interest is apparent 
among service men in Tobe Deutsch- 
mann Corporation's promotion of a 
set modernization plan. Theme song 
is "your present radio converted into 
an all-wave 1936 model." Promotional 
kit includes a poster, mats, stuffers, 
little stickers, and a descriptive book 
by Zeh Bouck, entire set priced at 25c. 
Deutschmann plant operates at Can- 
ton, Mass.; the company is the first to 
obtain a license from RCA to manufac- 
ture and sell the kits. 

PHONE BOOK STICKER 

* Among dealer helps 
for fall is a new "phone book sticker" 
just issued by Hygrade Sylvania 
Corp. The sticker, which carries 
service copy on a 5 x 2 inch radio 
tube design, makes a timely appear- 
ance now that new phone books are 
about to appear. Hygrade suggests 
that it may be used also to stick in- 
side a radio cabinet after servicing. 

DEMONSTRATION NEWS 

*• Technical Appliance 
Corp., 17 East 16th St., New York City, 
is issuing an illustrated bulletin, avail- 
able on request, on how to demonstrate 
one or more all-wave sets in the radio 
store regardless of interference. Taco's 
system uses an all-wave noiseless an- 
tenna, hooked up so as to obtain the 
maximum signal-to-noise ratio, and has 
a multiple position double-pole switch 
so that signals may be routed to a 
number of sets on the sales floors. 
Antenna components used in the set-up 
are standard products. 

TRICKY TUBE DISPLAY 

• Raytheon, 30 East 42nd 
St., New York City, has just built a 
new counter and window display fea- 
turing all-metal tubes, illustrated as 
they might appear in a real chassis. 
The affair is arranged so that the cus- 
tomer is inspired to stop, pick up and 
examine an actual tube. Display meas- 
ures 12 x 6 x 18, and is being distrib- 
uted free of charge to Raytheon 
dealers. 




*& SENSATIONAL 
ACHIEVEMENT 




RAYTHEON 

METAL TUBES 




UAM 

SPEAKERS 




holds great rewards 
for trained men 

The big opportunities in Radio will be 
enjoyed by trained men. The Interna- 
tional Correspondence Schools Radio 
Course, prepared by leading author- 
ities and constantly revised, •will help 
make you a trained man I A fascinat- 
ing book — FREE. 

AVIATION ENGINEERS 

are leaders in modern progress 

Aviation depends upon engines, 
and knowledge of aviation 
engines is a long step toward 
success in this rapidly growing 
industry. Many leading aviation 
engineers today took their first 
step by mailing a coupon to the 
I. C. S. at Scranton. Why don't 
follow their example? 



INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS 



Box 1413, Scranton, Penna. 
Explain fully about your course in the subject marked X: 




D RADIO 

□ Mechanical Drawing 

□ Experimental Television 

□ Practical Radio Servicing 

□ Radio Operating 



□ AVIATION 

□ Sound Technician 

□ Special Alternating Current 

□ Gas-Electric Welding 

□ Diesel Engines 



..Age.. 



November, 1935 



41 



WITH THE WHOLESALERS 



+ The Commonwealth Utilities 
Company, Chicago distributor of 
Atwater Kent radio sets and refrig- 
erators, recently moved into a new 
home at 1414 South Wabash Ave., 
where it has far more floor space 
and greatly increased facilities. This 
company is making rapid progress in 
the development of Atwater Kent 
business in the Chicago territory 
under the direction of S. E. Schul- 
man, president, and Walter O'Hal- 
loran, sales manager. 

*• Kos Howard, general manager 
of Zenith Distributing Co., 680 North 
Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111., has an- 
nounced the appointment of Harry D. 
Schoenwald as his assistant. "Harry," 
as he is known to the Chicago trade, 
has been identified with the music, 
radio and allied industries in the 
Windy City for over fifteen years. 
Mr. Howard has also announced the 
appointment of E. J. Collins, who 
will be in charge of developing 
Zenith sales in country territory. 

* Harry Dillon is a newcomer to 
the sales force of the Motor Power 
Equipment Co., St. Paul, Minn., ac- 
cording to the recent announcement 
of Frank M. Hutchinson, manager of 
the company's home appliance de- 
partment. Dillon has been in the 
radio wholesale business for more 
than 10 years. 

* Martin Buehler, president of 
the Graybar Electric Co., Minne- 
apolis, Minn., announces that his 
company has taken on the North- 
western distribution of the American- 
Bosch line. Earl Sharpe is sales 
manager of the Graybar Co. 

* The Monarch Home Appliance 
Co., 7421 Michigan Ave., Detroit, 
has been appointed dealer by the 
Aitken Radio Corporation, Detroit. 

* A. A. Schneiderhahn Co., Des 

Moines, Iowa, distributor of Zenith 
sets, RCA and Ken-Rad tubes, has 
announced the appointment of J. W. 
Wilkins as manager of retail sales. 

* J. M. James is the new travel- 
ing representative in northwestern 
Nebraska for the R. S. Proudflt Co., 
jobbers of Lincoln, Neb. 

■*■ Fischer Distributing Corp., 

wholesaler of radio parts and sup- 
plies, has moved from 152 Chambers 
St., N. Y. C, to bigger quarters at 
19 Park Place. Milton Fischer 
heads the organiation. 

* Arvin-New York Corp., metro- 
politan jobbers of Arvin home and 
iiuto radios and heaters, have added 
5 salesmen to their staff: Bernard 
Cohen, Joe Winkler, Julian Goldman, 
William J. Gaynor and Arthur R. 
Wormser. Henry D. Pelsen is sales 
manager of the company. 

* The Pittsburgh jobbers, Brown- 
Dorrance Electric Co., have recently 
named as dealers the firms of Will- 
son's, Sharon, Pa., and Euwer & 
Co., Jeanette, Pa. 



•*• Annual radio show at Louis- 
ville, Ky., Oct. 30 to Nov. 2, enjoyed 
a spirited representation by distribu- 
tors of the 1936 lines. Involved in 
the showings were these wholesalers: 
Pliilco Sales & Service, Bomar Manu- 
facturing Co., Otis Hidden Co., 
Cooper - Louisville Co., Sutcliffe's, 
Smith Distributing Co., General Elec- 
tric Supply Corp., Peaslee-Gaulbert 
Corp., Stratton & Terstegge Co. ana 
Harbison & Gathright. 

■*• Ten big time radio jobbers of 
Texas were in the "Around the World 
Radio Exposition" at San Antonio, 
first week of this month: E. J. Her- 
mann Sales Co. (Fairbanks-Morse), 
South Equipment Co. (RCA), Gen- 
eral Electric Supply Corp. ( GE ) , 
Peaslee-Gaulbert Corp. (Zenith), 
Graybar Electric Co. (Crosley), 
Straus-Frank Co. (Atwater Kent), 
Stromberg Carlson Telephone Manu- 
facturing Co. (Stromberg-Carlson), 
Taylor Distributing Co. (Philco) and 
Westinghouse Co. (Stewart-Warner). 

* Ben Oppenheim, exec of the 
B & O Radio Co., jobbers of Newark, 
N. J., has announced the addition of 
two salesmen to the company staff. 
They are William Nelson and Thomas 
L. DeLime. B & O sells Zenith and 
Norge. 

* Florida Appliance Co., Miami 
jobbers of Stromberg - Carlson, held 
its formal opening late last month. 
Frank McCloskey heads the new 
company, which has a retail store in 
the same city. 




He hool-ed a ieauty — did Ray F. 
Sparroiv, vice-pres. in charge of sales 
at the P. R. Mallory Co., Indianapolis. 



■k Group of new dealers has been 
announced by Cooper-Louisville Co., 

jobbers of Louisville, Ky., handling 
Crosley sets and tubes: Central Fur- 
niture Co., Bomor Summers Co., 
Electrical Appliance Co. (3 stores), 
Bills Consolidated Co. (13 stores), 
and Jas. Lang Furniture Co. 

* Klaus Radio & Electric Co., 

jobbers of Peoria, 111., have an- 
nounced five new dealers in the ter- 
ritory for RCA sets and tubes: Sieg 
Co., of Davenport, Iowa, and Rock 
Island, 111.; Mattoon Maytag Co., 
Mattoon, 111.; Kirkpatrick Housefur- 
nishings Co., Bloomington, 111.; Law- 
son Radio Shop, Monmouth, 111., and 
Waugh Bros., Burlington, Iowa. 

Klaus company has recently 
opened a new branch at 320 E. 
Fourth St., Davenport, Iowa, with L. 
D. Claybaugh in charge. 

* O. H. Hansen has been added 
to the sales organization of Lewis & 
Carnell Co., American-Bosch jobbers 
of Philadelphia. 

■*• L. J. Chatten, Fada's general 
sales manager, has announced ap- 
pointment of the R. F. and W. B. 
Fitch Co., Oskaloosa, Iowa, as exclu- 
sive Fada distributor in Southern 
Iowa area. Fitch Company uses spe- 
cial radio salesmen who handle noth- 
ing but home and auto receivers the 
year 'round. 

+ J. J. Pocock, Die, Philadelphia, 
has just been named as distributor 
of Stromberg-Carlson sets and acces- 
sories, to cover Eastern Pennsyl- 
vania, Southern New Jersey and 
State of Delaware. 

+ F. B. Connelly Co., one of the 

key distributors of the West, is also 
one of the few radio jobbers who 
must be listed for wholesaling nearly 
20 other products, ranging from 
automotive products to toys. Con- 
nelly has headquarters at Seattle, 
with branches at Portland, Spokane, 
and two Montana cities, Billings and 
Great Falls. 

* R. J. Newell has been ap- 
pointed assistant manager and sales 
manager of H. E. Sorensen Co., job- 
ber, of Des Moines, Iowa. 

+ Five important dealers have 
recently been appointed by the Al- 
bany Distributing Corp., Albany, 
N. Y., to handle Atwater Kent sets 
and RCA tubes in the area. They 
are The Wallace Co., Schenectady, 
N. Y. ; Right- Way Roofing Co., 
Gloversville, N. Y., and three Griffin 
Lumber stores in Glens Falls, Sara- 
toga and Corinth, N. Y. 

* Lewis & Carnell Co., Amer- 
ican-Bosch jobbers of Philadelphia, 
have issued a list of recently ap- 
pointed dealers: Lit Brothers, Phila- 
delphia; Stern & Co., Trenton, N. J.; 
Shai'l'er Furnit.ive Co., Reading, Pa.; 
Miller Bros., Wilmington, Del.; Og- 
den Howard Co., Wilmington. 

* C. S. Tay, of the Crosley Dis- 
tributing Corp., Chicago, has sent the 
news that the company has a total 
of 13 recently appointed dealers; the 
L. Fish Furniture Co. with a chain of 
8 stores, and the Levinson Radio 
Stores, with a chain of 5 stores. 



42 



Radio Today 



TRADE NEWS 



* Charles E. Wilson of 

Bridgeport, Conn., vice-president and 
head ot the merchandise department 
of General Electric, has been named 
director of all appliance activities of 
the company, according to a recent 
announcement by President Gerard 
Swope. In this capacity, Mr. Wilson 
assumes the work of T. K. Quinn, 
vice-president in charge of specialty 
appliances at Cleveland, who has re- 
signed and on Jan. 1 will head an 
ad company. 

* Recent order from 
Arabia brought the number of Hy- 
grade Sylvania tube customers in 
different foreign countries up to 100, 
announces W. A. Coogan, Hygrade's 
foreign sales manager. Coogan has 
worked on his coverage job until he 
now gets a steady flow of orders 
from widely scattered parts of the 
world; he says that the export mar- 
ket at present appears to be on very 
solid ground, and believes that he 
may soon add more markets abroad. 

* Troy Radio Manufac- 
turing Co., with W. L. Sexton general 
managing it, has moved into new and 
enlarged quarters at 1142-44 South Olive 
St., Los Angeles, Calif. New display 
rooms will feature cabinets in such 
finishes as maple, walnut, mahogany, 
and bone-white, several of which are 
reported as getting quite a rise out 
of coast dealers. 



* P. H. Tartak, presi- 
dent of the Oxford Tartak Radio Cor- 
poration, 350 West Huron St., Chicago, 
111., manufacturer of loud speakers and 
other radio products, sent out an 
important announcement recently 
stating that the Tartak Manufactur- 
ing Company had taken over the 
Oxford Radio Corporation and would 
in the future be known as the Ox- 
ford Tartak Radio Corporation, 
thereby coordinating the equipment, 
personnel and good-will of these two 
manufacturing organizations. The 
company has leased additional floor 
space to take care of its increased 
business. 

* Louis Gerard Pacent, 

pioneer radio engineer and manufac- 
turer, and president of the Pacent 
Engineering Corp., New York City, 
has been appointed a member of the 
New York World Fair Committee, 
1939. Pacent is Fellow and former 
president of the Radio Club of Amer- 
ica, Fellow of the American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers, and 
Fellow of the Society of Motion Pic- 
ture Engineers. 

■k Dnane Wanamaker, 

advertising director of General 
Household Utilities Co., Chicago, 
since the formation of the company 
and one of the best known advertis- 
ing executives in the radio industry, 
resigned from this position on Nov. 
15 for the purpose of taking a long 
vacation. Mr. Wanamaker expects 
to sail on Nov. 2 for the South Sea 
Isles, returning to Chicago about 
March 1. 



* New Grebe Radio 
and Television Corp., with factories 
at Jamaica, Long Island, N. Y., and 
offices at 55 Wejt 42nd St., New 
York City, is ready for delivery of 
its improved receivers, according to 
Maurice Raphael. Founder Alfred 
H. Grebe, widely known radio pio- 
neer, recently died, but his technical 
staff of many years' standing remains 
active and Grebe developments are 
enthusiastically received by the in- 
dustry. Grebe models presented at 
this time were perfected by Mr. 
Grebe before his death. 

+ Technical Appliance 
Corp. has moved from Long Island 
City to 17 East 16th St., New York 
City. New quarters will triple the 
floor space, and new machinery will 
permit 300% boost in production. 
Company makes all-wave noiseless 
antenna kits, components, and allied 
products. 

* I)r. Henry A. Bellows, 

former Federal Radio Commissioner, 
and recently vice-president of the Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting System, is the 
author of an article on tne radio in- 
dustry, in "Harper's Magazine" for 
November. 

* Two more orders for 
police radio installations have been 
received by the Westinghouse Elec- 
tric & Manufacturing Co. at the 
Chicopee Falls. Mass., works, accord- 
ing to C. M. Hobart, sales manager 
of the company. One order comes 
from Bakersfield, Calif., and the other 
from Bloomfield, N. J. 



Radio Today's 
* BOOK SHOP * 

Outstanding Radio Books are available at the 
prices listed. No charge will be made for wrap- 
ping and mailing. Send remittance with order. 
Address : 
BOOK SHOP, RADIO TODAY 
180 Lexington Avenue, New York, X. Y. 

MODERN RADIO ESSENTIALS $2.00 

Bv Kenneth A. Hathaway. 
THE OUTLOOK FOR TELEVISION $4.00 

By Orrin E. Dunlap. Jr. 
THE ADVERTISING AGENCY LOOKS AT RADIO $3.00 

Edited by Neville O'Neill. 
SOS TO THE RESCUE $2.50 

By Karl Baarslag. 
LOUD SPEAKERS $13.50 

By N. W. McLaehlan. 
ELEMENTS OF LOUD SPEAKER PRACTICE S1.75 

By N. W. McLaehlan. 
EXPERIMENTAL RADIO $2.75 

By Prof. R. R. Ramsey. 
THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RADIO $3.50 

By Prof. R. R. Ramsey. 
YOUR INVENTION $1.50 

By Elmore B. Lyford. 
APPLIED ACOUSTICS $4.50 

By Harry F. Olson and Frank Massa. 
RADIO PHYSICS COURSE $4.00 

By Alfred A. Ghlrardi. 
AIRCRAFT RADIO $3.00 

By Myron F. Eddy. 
PRINCIPLES OF RADIO COMMUNICATION $7.50 

By John H. Morecroft. 
ELEMENTS OF RADIO COMMUNICATION $3.00 

By John H. Morecroft. 
EXPERIMENTAL RADIO ENGINEERING $3.50 

Bv John H. Morecroft. 
PRINCIPLES OF RADIO $3.50 

By Keith Henney. 
RADIO ROUND THE WORLD $1.75 

By A. W. Haslett. 
THE RISE OF RADIO $2.50 

By Paul Schubert. 
THE STORY OF RADIO $2.75 

By Orrin E. Dunlap. Jr. 







0U\ 



ARE YOU, TOO, 
CASHING-IN ON THIS 

PROFIT-MAKING FILTER? 

Outstanding results ::- the best materials includ- 
ing Miller exclusive duo-lateral wound coils * a 
handsome unit :> and priced at $4 list— this com- 
bination has turned the trick for dealers every- 
where who have made it a point to sell the Miller 
ASK ABOUT Line Filter for positive noise elimination. The 

THIS DISPLAY unsurpassed efficiency of this unit will definitely 
filter-out all high frequency and household appli- 
ance disturbances from power lines forever. 
Don't pass up this easy, extra money in your ter- 
ritory. There is no installation expense. The Miller 
Filter just plugs in. Ask your distributor, or write 



)«^LINE FILTER 



J. W. MILLER COMPANY 



5917 South Main Street 



Los Angeles, California 



November, 1935 



43 



SELLING RECORDS 

Holiday slants on radio-phonograph combinations 



* TIED up in tinsel and pro- 
moted right and left are the holiday 
offering's in records, with the disc 
makers promptly cooperating with 
special Yuletide releases. But Christ- 
mas selling in music shops this season 
may be given a new slant, via radio- 
phonograph combinations. Now, of 
all times, is the moment to point out 
that the combination is an instrument 
of genuine distinction, notably 
adapted to holiday giving. 

There is, of course, the problem of 
finding a radio-phonograph combina- 
tion at a list price that will stimulate 
public interest in this type of instru j 
ment, carrying along with it an in- 
creased demand for records. There 
is missing a unanimity of opinion 
among retailers as to the most de- 
sirable list price for the ideal radio 
and phonograph combination; how- 
ever, this should be expected in a 
measure, for it is obvious that the 
dealer who specializes on the sale of 
records of the better type of music 



AUDAX 

TRADE MARK 

rr The standard 

by which others are 

judged and valued" 

MODELS to suit every demand 
from the humblest mtdget-com- 
bination to the HIGH FIDELITY 
— low needle-pressure require- 
ments of fine transcriptions. 
AUDAX electric pick-ups are 
immune to climatic conditions. 
They are chosen on a PER- 
FORMANCE basis, as equip- 
ment in most of the world's 
leading Radio Stations, Universi- 
ties, Laboratories — in fact, wher- 
ever quality counts. List prices 
from $9.50 to $300.00 each. 
What is your pick-up problem ? 

Special Recording Heads to Order 

AUDAK COMPANY 
500 Fifth Ave., New York 

"Creators oj High Grade Electrical 
and Acoustical Apparatus Since 191 j" 




will lean toward the higher price 
radio-phonograph combination, prin- 
cipally because it affords better tone 
reproduction which is an essential 
factor in the sale of higher priced 
records. 

On the other hand, the retailers 
who are finding a steadily increasing 
demand for dance music and popular 
vocal hits are emphatic in asking the 
manufacturers to give them a com- 
bination instrument selling under 
one hundred dollars. 

New type album 

* Columbia Masterworks 
Records are the subject of a new and 
intensive sales campaign inaugurated 
by Brunswick Record Corp., New 
York. A new type of album featur- 
ing the Masterworks series has just 
been introduced, complete with many 
distinctive and attractive features. 

"Stoky's" promotional trek 

* Robust promotion of 
symphonic music and radio-phono- 
graph combinations will be RCA's 
snringtime sponsorship of a trans- 
continental tour by Leopold Stokow- 
ski and his Philadelphia Symphony 
Orchestra. As the most important 
single activity undertaken by Mr. 
Stokowski in recent years, project is 



Best sellers as we go to press 

BRUNSWICK 
Cheek to Cheek — Fox trot. No Strings 
— Fox trot. (Both from "Top Hat"). 
Vocal and tap dancing by Fred Astaire 
with Leo Reisman and his Orchestra — 
7486. 

Isn't This a Lovely Day? — Fox trot. 
Top Hat, White Tie and Tails — Fox 

trot. (Both from "Top Hat"). Vocal 
and tap dancing by Fred Astaire with 
Johnny Green and his Orchestra — 7487. 

So Nice Seeing You Again — Fox trot. 
(From "We're In the Money"). Vocal 
by Maxine Grey with Hal Kemp and 
his Orchestra. The Gentleman Obvi- 
ously Doesn't Believe — Fox trot. Vocal 
by Skinny Ennis with Hal Kemp and 
Orchestra — 7503. 

DECCA 
Cheek to Cheek — Fox trot. Top Hat, 
■White Tie and Tails — Fox Trot. (Both 
from "Top Hat") with Boswell Sisters 
vocal trio and Orchestra — 574. 

You Are My Lucky Star — Fox trot. 
(From "Broadway Melody of 1936"). 
VC. La Cucaraeha — Fox trot. VC. Both 
by Louis Armstrong and his Orchestra 
—580. 

Babs — Fox trot with vocal trio. 
Thunder — Fox trot, VC. Dan Grisson, 
both by Jimmie Lunceford and his 
Orchestra — 579. 

VICTOR 
Truckin' — Fox trot. The Girl I Left 
Behind Me — Fox trot. "Fats" Waller 
and his Rhythm — 25116. 

Cheek to Cheek — Fox trot. Isn't It A 
Lovely Day? — Fox trot. (Both from 
RKO film "Top Hat") Eddy Duchin and 
his Orchestra — 25093. 

Top Hat — Fox trot. Ficcolino — Fox 

trot. Ray Noble and his Orchestra — 
25094. 



expected to have vast effect upon re- 
corded music and allied matters. 
Dealer exploitations will be spotted 
along the 5-week route of the troupe 
which will include 100 players, trav- 
eling in a special air-conditioned 
train. Thirty-six concerts will be 
played in music centers of United 
States and Canada, and will begin 
when the current orchestra season 
ends. 



No. 33 
(Needle Ballast) 
Listed at $24.50 




Decca's Boswell Sisters, scoring a hit with "Top Hat" tunes. 



44 



Radio Today 





Panorama of WOR 50 K W Broadcast Slalion 



ISOLANTITE PLAYS AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN 
THE MODERN BROADCAST TRANSMITTER. 

The 50 K.W. Transmitter recently built by Western 
Electric for Station WOR employs ISOLANTITE 
liberally. 

In this up-to-date station are strain insulators, concentric 
transmission line spacers and end seals, stand-offs, switches, 
shafts, inductance supports, power and rectifier tube sup- 
ports, condenser cases, pedestals and many other parts of 

ISOLANTITE. 

To improve your equipment, specify ISOLANTITE in- 
sulation. Isolantite Inc., 233 Broadway, New Yor\, 
N. Y. Factory at Belleville, N. J. 

Represented by GRAYBAR ELECTRIC CO 



bokfltite 



CERHIT1IC in5ULHT0R5 








Here's the Tube Checker for which first prize has 
just been awarded in this nation-wide product 
design contest. Selected the winner . . above all 
other products submitted . . because it combines 
eye-appeal and dignity in outward appearance, with 
sound Weston engineering on the inside. In other 
words, it meets every need of the tube dealer and 
serviceman. It will do a real tube-selling job on 
the counter ... it is sufficiently compact for port- 
able use . . . and it will serve faithfully for years, 
as all Weston Instruments will. See Model 770 
today, or, write for bulletin . . . Weston Electrical 
Instrument Corporation, 597 Frelinghuysen Ave., 
Newark, New Jersey. 



Weston 

Radio Instruments 



A 



» 





i 



▲ 



$1 Yearly 



Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexington Ave. 



New York City 



lenera 



IB 



usiness 



— Volume 25% above year ago 

— Recovery reaches 96% 

— Auto output 100%; steel 100% 

— Electricity use, up 11% 

— Employment index rises 

— Consumer buying up 14% 

Radio Trade 

— Sales pick up after warm Fall 

— Epidemic of "deals" and premium 
offers demoralize retailing in spots 

— Silverware, cameras, china, theatre- 
tickets, boat-rides, given with sets 

— Third-quarter receiver volume 46% 
ahead of same period of '34 

— Excise-taxes collected on radio 
leap 129% ahead in Oct.; 26% 
for year 

— 1935 sales est. 5,600,000 sets 

Better Broadcasts; 
Better Radio-set Sales 

— Total broadcast revenue up 25% 
over '34 (contrast with magazines, 
up 6%; newspapers, up 4%) 

— For Dec. NBC approaches $3,000,- 
000; CBS $1,800,000 

— Television talk grows hotter,- Sarnoff 
says commercial service still 4 
years off 

— Facsimile broadcasts to homes seen 
as next step 

Farm-Radio Uprush 

— Agricultural prosperity zooms 

— Battery-set output triples; windmill 
generators factor 

— Still 4 million farms without radios 

— Farm sales may be lever to extend 
radio's seasonal peak 



M -"i I935 ) 
CONCENTRATION IN RADIO 

9 J Out of 13 tube 

mfrs. 1 




urers 



TEN 

DO 77% 

of the radio-set 
business 



mrrs 




FOUR 

DO 84% 

of the radio-tube 
business 



25,- J I Out of 40,000 radio 
000 | I dealers 




15,000 

DO 82% 

of the retail radio 
business 



In 1935, concentration in the radio industry reached its peak. Next year may 
witness greater changes in manufacturing lines, and probably wider diversity 



.»o 



'S WHO AND WHERE-TO-BUY NUMBER 




DECEMBER, 1935 




On the Air, 

as on the Midway- 



Brings 'Em In! 

The sort of Showmanship that brings 
NBC Networks the largest radio au- 
diences in the world — your prospects 



Wherever crowds are caught and held, Show- 
manship does the job. This goes for every 
form of entertainment — from a Midway 
muscle dance to grand opera. And in the 
building of those radio programs which 
achieve their top on NBC Networks, Show- 
manship gains its greatest audience — an au- 
dience which holds your most potent prospects 
for receiver set sales. 

The glamour, excitement, humor and ro- 
mance which distinguish these nationally 
famous programs do not just happen. Their 
vast daily audience is won and held by the 
most adroit type of showmanship. These pro- 
grams are one of your greatest sales assets. The 
interest they arouse provides a great incentive 
for better receiving sets. Increase your sales 
by dramatizing not only your fine instruments 
and the fine products you sell, but also the 
great NBC programs. 



1 une in the RCA Magic Key Program 
every Sunday 2 to 3 P. M., E. S. T. 
on WJZ and associated NBC stations. 



National Broadcasting Company, Inc. 

A Radio Corporation of America Subsidiary 
NEW YORK • CHICAGO -WASHINGTON -SAN FRANCISCO 



PHEnomcnm demimid greets 

s mETBL TUBE 




Oil El C BUILT F0R hieim TUBES FROUI the 
M G ■» a grouhd up . . . ninny nnunnrnGES 



Few, if any, radio manufacturer has given more 
time and thought than has Crosley to the place 
of the metal tube in radio manufacturing. Na- 
turally, the moment metal tubes had reached the 
practical stage, many manufacturers rushed into 
print announcing metal tube sets. While Cros- 
ley was early in the field with metal tube sets, it 
was with circuits especially developed for metal 
tubes. The result was that Crosley metal-tube- 
designed radios — by giving people this latest 
scientific development at prices they could afford 
to pay — swept the field. Crosley's fall volume, 
the greatest in Crosley's history, proves this to 
be a fact. 

Crosley metal tube radio receivers have demon- 
strated a quality and a performance that have 
made them popular beyond belief. Due to their 
small size, metal tubes may be located closer to 
their ideal position ; the shielding is closer to the 
elements, with greatly improved shielding effect; 
metal tubes give improved short wave perform- 
ance; increase the power; they are non-micro- 
phonic; vibrationless; unbreakable; give greater 
selectivity; extreme quietness. In short, their 
advantages, as demonstrated in the Crosley me- 
tal-tube circuits, are tangible and sales-worthy. 
The models shown here represent the most ad- 
vanced steps in metal tube practice. Their 
performance and value give undisputed local 
leadership to the dealer who is alert enough to 
see their possibilities. 

The Crosley Radio Corporation - Cincinnati 

POWEL CROSLEY, Jr., President 

Home of "the Illation's Station" — WLW — 500,000 watts — 
most powerful in the world — 70 on your dial. 



THE CR0S1EV B. F. 111. 



(AMERICAN) (FOREIGN) (METAL TUBES) 




Incomparably radio's 
greatest value today. A 
sensation wherever shown. 
Cabinet has figured wal- 
nut veneer front panel. 
Chassis is superhetero- 
dyne, specially designed 
for 5 metal tubes. Two 
tuning bands: American 
(540-1710 kc) and Foreign 
(2350-7500 kc). Illumi- 
nated airplane type dial. 
Full floating moving coil 
electro-dynamic speaker. 
Many other features. 

The A. F. M. is also avail- 
able in a handsome con- 
sole, retailing for $47.50. 



CR0S1EV consTiTUTion consoLE 

This marvelous radio re- 
ceiver gives virtual control 
of whatever is on the air, 
wherever it may come 
from! In it are concen- 
trated every one of Cros- 
ley's 1936 radio features. 
Ten metal tubes in a spe- 
cially designed superhet- 
erodyne 5-band all -wave 
chassis. Among the fea- 
tures: 3-gang tuning con- 
denser with many im- 
provements; new 2-speed 
dial; new high -wattage 
metal - to - metal contact 
tone control; new triple- 
tuned i. f. transformer; 
new shadow tuning; new 
5-color airplane dial: new 
color band designation. 

Prices in Florida, Rocky Mountain Slates an 
West, slightly higher. 




OTHER CROSLEY METAL TUBE MODELS 



0LYMPIA 





MERRIMAC 



Sis metal tube super- 
heterodyne; 3 tuning 
bands; American, po- 
lice- amateur- aviation, 
and foreign broadcasts. 

TABLE $je na 

MODEL fl 1 "-"" 

CONSOLE $59.95 





MONITOR 



Eight metal tube super- 
heterodyne: 3 tuning 
bands: American, po- 
lice- amateur -aviation, 
and foreign broadcasts. 
TABLE *CC HA 

MODEL wwJ-UW 

CONSOLE $89.95 





CONSTITUTION 



Eight metal tube all- 
wave superheterodyne 
Five tuning bands. 
Many extraordinary 



$77.50 




MODEL 
CONSOLE $97.50 



Console model is de- 
scribed above. This is 
the finest receiver — 
both as to chassis and 
cabinet — in the 1936 
Crosley line. 10 tubes. 
5 tuning bands. 
TABLE <TQQ AC 

MODEL *«»■*« 



WHATEVER HAPPENS .. .YOU'RE THERE WITH A CROSLEY 



Radio Today, published monthly by Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexington Avenue, New York 
Subscriptions yearly, $1 in U.S. ; $2 in Canada and foreign countries. Copyright 1935 by Caldwell-Clements. 



City, / 
, Inc. 1 




The Most Sensational 
Value In Radio 

A NEW Moderne design with strikingly beautiful cabi- 
1~\. net of selected American walnut and band inlay of 
I' rich cross-fire oriental 'walnut. Horizontal grille open- 

ings with gleaming control knobs and polished base in 
black ebony finish lend a modernistic touch now very 
much in vogue. <I Sharply selective, with amazing 
performance and natural full tone. Two distinct bands 
tuning 550 to 1600 Kilocycles and 70 to 180 Meters. 
Fully shielded I. F. transformers; coils impregnated 
against moisture. Sturdy, rust-proof chassis with two- 
gang, ball-bearing condenser. Pilot-lighted, full- 
vision, double-pointer dial; powerful 5-inch electro- 
dynamic speaker. 

Write for full details of complete Kadette line, priced 
from $13.50 to $76.00. 

X Also available for export as Model BL-06 with T 
K range 1S5 to 555 Meters and 850 to 2500 Meters. J 



INTERNATIONAL RADIO CORPORATION 

ANN ARBOR ■ MICHIGAN 



TUBE 



POWERFUL AC-DC 
SUPERHETERODYNE 



•AMATEUR 



•AIRPLANE 



•ALL POLICE 



• STANDARD BROADCAST 



List Price' Complete 




(Western Prices Slightly Higher) 



Radio Today 



DEC 21 1935 



/ 



Staff— 

Darbell Bartee 
Franklin S. Irby 
Randall R. Irwin 
G. H. Mayorga 
M. H. Newton 
J. E. Osmun 
John F. Rider 
B. V. Spinetta 
Vinton K. Ulrich 



Lee Robinson 

Sales Manager 



©C1B 285049 yw 



RADIO 

TODAY 



Orestes H. Caldwell 
Editor 

M. Clements 
Publisher 

480 Lexington Ave. 

New York City 
Tel. PLaza 3-1340 

Vol. I/No. 4 " 



Improvement general 

* Pick-up in December 
is more marked in general business 
than in retail radio trade, which 
slowed down somewhat, despite 
Christmas shopping activity. 

Index of general recovery, as com- 
piled by N. Y. Times, now stands at 
about 96 per cent. Automobile activ- 
ity around 100 per cent; steel same. 
Employment up, meaning more cash 
to spend. 

Heavy consumer buying of Christ- 
mas goods reported from all general 
merchandise lines. Gain, over last 
year, 14 per cent. 

Foreign inquiries 30 per cent ahead 
of '34. 



Broadcast billings 

* CBS estimate for De- 
cember is $1,800,000, as against $1,- 
674,087 for the same month last year. 
NBC this month is due for a slight 
gain over the $2,776,436 chalked up 
for December 1934 on both nets. 

Total revenue in the United States, 
including national nets, regional nets, 
national non-networks, and local is 
expected for the year to be about 25 
per cent over 1934, when the total 
added up to $72,887,000. All of 
which brightly indicates that for the 
12-month season beginning last fall, 
the totals may easily run to $100,000,- 
000, as previously estimated by Radio 
Today. 



New stir in give-aways 

* Curious trend in radio 
trade traffic is the recent accent on 
premiums given outright with the 
purchase of sets. Now, of all times, 
with the radio business back to a 
handsome peak, far ahead of even 
'29 — "deals" and premiums not na- 
tively identified with radio come 



back to stir up the retail scene with 
special lure. 

On the list of items being offered 
to the public along with radio sets, 
one wearily notices such teasers as 
theatre tickets, watches, trays, cam- 
eras, mixers, china, silverware, 
clocks, lamps and, prospectively, bi- 
cycles ! 

Premium wrinkle also figures in 
jobber-manufacturer relations; there 
it takes the form of trips to South 
America, the Bahamas, Atlantic City 
and such assorted hot spots. Dealers 
are also premiumized with sets of 
china and silverware. 



Sets up 46%, 3rd quarter 

* The third quarter of 
1935 showed a 46 per cent increase in 
the dollar value of the radio sets 
manufactured, as compared with the 
corresponding quarter of 1934. The 
retail value of the average set built 
increased from $48 in 1934 to $54 in 
1935, without tubes. 

Tube sales for the third quarter in- 



creased 64 per cent over 1934, in both 
number of units and dollar totals, the 
average price per tube remaining 
practically unchanged. 

3>rd Quarter Units Value 

Sets, 1934... 1,166,443 $23,366,500 
Sets, 1935... 1,521,684 34,288,500 

Tubes, 1934. . 12,200,577 4,472,389 
Tubes, 1935.. 20,559,634 7,365,897 



Music first, 
comedy second 

* Droves of radio people 
have steadfastly watched the some- 
what erratic direction of public 
preferences in radio programs, and 
the young but hard-working Radio 
Institute of Audible Arts always has 
an official eye open. The Institute's 
experience with researches in the 
matter prompts its report that music 
is first in average listener preference; 
comedy ranks second, drama third, 
and sports and news broadcasts 
fourth. 




December, 1935 



One-quarter new autos 
soon ivith radios 

* Interest of the automo- 
bile industry in equipping its new 
cars with radio sets is increasing rap- 
idly as plans for 1936 mature. Prac- 
tically all cars are now drilled and 
arranged for radio, and within 18 
months, according to Detroit gossip, 
radio will be standard equipment, 
with one-third to one-quarter of all 
new cars fully fitted out with radio 
receivers as they go into owners' 
hands. 

New types of antennas are being- 
developed to supplement present un- 
der-running-board models. One new 
type employs a decorative scroll on 
top of the car-roof, adding both style 
and better reception. 

BC up 21%; mags 6%; 



press 4% 



* Healthy ten-month to- 
tals just issued by the National As- 
sociation of Broadcasters put radio in 
a brilliant lead in point of gains over 
last year, compared with other ad- 
vertising media. Significant aspect 
of the summaries is that the news- 
papers are trailing the outfit in per 
cent of gain. 

Broadcast advertising for the 10- 
month period 1935 jumped eagerly to 
21 per cent above the same months of 
1934, when the total was $70,626,000. 
Magazines gained 6 per cent, farm 
papers 5 per cent, and newspapers 
only 4 per cent. 




Leslie Muter, president RMA, who 

sees new promotional possibilities for 

increasing radio-industry sales. 



To smooth out radio 
seasonal sales 

* Bight in the midst of 
radio's winter rush, foresighted B. H. 
G. Mathews of Ford, Browne & 
Mathews, Chicago, rises to point out 
that this present prosperity ought to 
be extended on into spring and sum- 
mer. "It would be nice, wouldn't it, 
if so many factories, jobbers and deal- 



ers did not mentally go out of busi- 
ness Dec. 25 !" 

To smooth out the radio industry's 
sales curve over a period of 12 
months, it will help, he observes, if 
all hands will start thinking up ways 
to even up sales, such as (1) advance 
jobber commitments, (2) stimulation 
of auto radio in summer, (3) farm 
radio, (4) pushing of summer broad- 
cast programs. Everybody in radio 
will be better off if the whole indus- 
try can get behind such an all-year 
program. 



Time out of mind 

* NBC has had a lively 
encounter, via the mails, with its 
newly affiliated station, WOOD, in 
Grand Bapids, Mich. Uproar was 
over Michigan's position in time 
zones; network advertisers on the air 
from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m., New York 
time, had to know whether they paid 
day rates or night rates. 

Able NBC exec E. P. H. James 
faced the facts : WOOD is technically 
in the Central zone, along with the 
rest of the state of Michigan, ex- 
cepting Detroit. But the people of 
the state do not admire the arrange- 
ment, so Mr. James decides "that the 
working facts are more important to 
radio advertisers than the archives 
. . . from now on, WOOD is listed 
under Eastern Standard Time." 



Radio listening and 
kiv-hr use 




Mr. and Mrs. Ely Culbertson play an international bridge game with South 

America over General Electric short-wave station W2XAF, Schenectady, and 

Transradio station LSX, Buenos Aires. 



* Becently the electric- 
companies have been breaking their 
own 1929 production records. A con- 
siderable factor in the increase of 
electricity used by residence cus- 
tomers has been the consumption of 
kw-hours by radio sets directly, and 
also incidentally through resulting 
late lighting. In 1929 the average 
dwelling used 500 kw-hrs annually; 
now the figure is 675. 

An average radio set (operated 4 
hours per day, consumes about 10 kw- 
hrs per month. With nearly 20,000,- 
000 electric radios now in use, this 
means a monthly consumption of 
200,000,000 kw-hrs for radio-set op- 
eration alone. The total consumption 
of these same dwellings is 1,180,000,- 
000 kw-hrs per month. Thus over 14 
per cent of present electricity con- 
sumption goes into long-hour opera- 
tion of radios, while as much more is 
probably used for lighting attributa- 
ble to radio-set listening. 



Radio Today 



Chicago hot-bed of 
private-label sets 

* Field conditions in the 
Chicago territory at present do not 
differ in any important way from the 
generally handsome status of the in- 
dustry nationally; optimism is uni- 
form in the radio trade of the city it- 
self, especially among the set and 
parts makers. 

Chicago merchandising methods do, 
however, under current conditions, 
supply dramatic examples of the good 
and the bad. In some quarters the 
Windy City is a hot-bed of "private- 
labeF set manufacturing, which has 
unfortunate adaptations at the hands 
of dealers who are volume-mad. As- 
sorted name plates are offered on new 
cabinets, so that the dealer may ad- 
vertise spectacular price cuts, devel- 
oping a transient volume which wiser 
merchants would recognize as hope- 
lessly temporary and artificial. Often 
distributors unsuspectingly handle 
the same chassis in different cabinets 
under different names. 



Programs for 
the upper half 

* Highest-brow program 
building on the records to date may 
be credited to Carl Haverlin, sales 
manager of stations KECA and KFI, 
Los Angeles. Critical and class-con- 
scious, Haverlin has worked out a 
fixed schedule of quality features, al- 
most entirely recorded. These are 
announced in a monthly magazine, 
EEOA Concert Programs, edited by 
Jose Rodriguez, in which the tech- 
nical aspects of musical masterpieces 
are quietly taken up for the benefit 
of persons with advanced tastes. 

Sponsors may buy time for spot 
announcements, but they are given 
no opportunity for serious commer- 
cial inroads upon the quality schedule 
already announced. 



Millions that help sell radios 

* Vast expenditures be- 
ing made by sponsors in order to 
keep top-notch artists on the air, is 
one reason why listeners may expect 
to get the genuinely sensational fea- 
tures. General Foods Corp. must 
pay a bill of $2,000,000 a season; 
Procter & Gamble spends an esti- 
mated $1,600,000. Ford Motor Co 
maintains air features costing some 
$1,500,000 so far this year, and Camp- 
bell Soup invests an amazing sum in 




Arthur T. Murray, president United 

American Bosch, has just completed a 

big factory extension. 

''Hollywood Hotel" and the Burns 
and Allen feature. 

Standard Brands, Inc., recently 
spent $150,000 in a single month for 
four entertainment units including 
the gilt-edged Major Bowes program. 
Seasonal expenditures of Colgate- 
Palmolive-Peet run to an estimated 
$850,000. Meanwhile, Helen Hayes 
ditches an $85,000 movie contract to 
go on the air, and Paul Whiteman 
signs up at $10,000 a week ! 



Hoover pushes G station 

* National network oper- 
ated by the Federal Bureau of In- 
vestigation, centered around a power- 
ful short-wave station, is being urged 
past the experimental stage by the 
Bureau's famed director, J. Edgar 
Hoover. Web should help to trap 
criminals through nationwide hook- 
up with local police groups. 

Bureau of Standard's one-kilowatt 
station at Beitsville, Md., is being 
used in a new series of tests for De- 
cember. Director Hoover's version of 
it is that final plans will not be an- 
nounced until another year of ex- 
perimentation reveals the possibilities 
of a central super-power station. 

Home movies stimulated 
by film magnates 

* Cold shivers have been 
chasing themselves up and down some 
distinguished spines in the motion- 
picture industry, now that television 
is being talked about as a reality. So 
a couple of weeks ago, some of the 
major movie magnates journeyed to 
Camden, and the clear, bright televi- 
sion pictures they saw there gave 
them fresh jitters! 

When they recovered, most were 
ready to offer recent film features and 
current "trailers" as television ma- 
terial to boost present movie houses. 
Others urged immediate release of 
feature films on 16 mm. to promote 
home movies vigorously as an offset 
to television. 




Heap much honor for Edgar Kobak (center), NBC vice-president, who went to 

Oklahoma City to address the A.F.A. convention and wound up by becoming a 

Pawnee Indian. The tribe dubbed him "Chief Air Talk." 



December, 1935 



THE TELEVISION BUGABOO 

What to tell customers who want to delay buying 
radios until they can get both sight and sound 



* OUCH ! A brand new pain-in- 
the-neck. 

Sizable section of the radio indus- 
try thus refers to the corning of tele- 
vision But it's by no means as black 
as that. Tou don't have to do any 
fancy reasoning to see that the sit- 
uation, menacing as it appears, has 
plenty of merry angles to it. 

Naturally, television stories make 
good reading. In conversations 
among radio men, in articles in pop- 
ular magazines, and in occasional 
newspaper stories, the subject strides 
importantly to the front. 

With the British Broadcasting 
Corporation scheduled to put tele- 
vision on the air in London during 
March, the surmise has been made 
that similar television experimenta- 
tion would follow in America about 
the same time, or a month or so later. 

Now assuredly, the United States 
can hold up its end when it comes to 
television development, and un- 



doubtedly next year will see the be- 
ginning of television tests in the 
metropolitan area around New York 
City. 

Cover only 30-mile radius 

But the radio industry and trade 
can "rest easy" in the knowledge that 
these television experiments soon to 
take form from the Empire State 
Building in New York, will be only 
of academic interest to the radio 
trade for the next year or two, and 
that such tests will be limited in 
their scope to the horizon distance 
from the lofty Empire State tower — 
30 miles or so. 

The coming experiments therefore 
need have no direct influence on radio 
sales in the country as a whole, at 
the beginning, and indeed for the 
next two to four years. 

These television experiments will 
have to be made on a metropolitan 



WORLD-TELEGRAM, 




TELEVISION NEXT SPRING 



Professor Webb, Minnesota Univer 
ity, Predicts General Service Then 

By the Associated Press. 

MINNEAPOLIS, Pec. 5— Televi- 
sion for the general public, Profes- 
sor James Webb, of the University 
of Minnesota, said today would be 
gin by spring. 

He said manufacturers soon would 
place twenty or thirty television sets 
in Eastern hotel lobbies or railroad 
stations. 

Professor Webb said programs 
would be sent from a central trans 
mitting unit. The receiving sets 
would be small, he explained, with 
the picture, screens about 18 by 24 
inches. 



i 



How movie films will be transmitted to homes by television. The station direc- 
tor at Berlin watches the picture as sent out by this film-scanning machine. 



Recent newspaper stories like this have 
upset radio buyers 

scale, to find out how the present tele- 
vision system will act under practical 
operating conditions. 

For, so far, television is perfected 
only as a laboratory operation. In 
the laboratories, under ideal condi- 
tions, and with bulky experimental 
equipment, television pictures of sur- 
prising quality and clearness are al- 
ready obtained. Brilliant pictures, 8 
by 10 inches, now reproduce outdoor 
and studio scenes with commonplace 
regularity. So perfect are these pic- 
tures that, as in movies, the medium 
is now forgotten and one's interest 
focusses itself on the events being 
televised. In that sense, television is 
already perfected. 

Swell pictures in lab 

But next these laboratory processes 
will have to be tested in the field. So 
during 1936, according to gossip 
around New York, it is proposed to 
start sending out test programs from 
the Empire State tower. Meanwhile 
several hundred test television re- 
ceivers (later to sell at $250 to $400) 
will be distributed around the New 
York metropolitan area, and with 
these the technique of television 
broadcasting will be studied. 

There are still many problems. In 
order to transmit television of great 



Radio Today 



detail, wide bands of frequencies are 
required — a million cycles or so. Such 
bands are available only down in the 
ultra-short-wave region of the radio 
spectrum. 

Unfortunately, these ultra short- 
waves necessary for television do not 
carry to great distances, but only to 
the horizon. They are cut off like 
light, by buildings, hills, etc. Some- 
times the television waves are re- 
flected by building fronts so that dis- 
tortions are introduced — and "ghosts" 
float into the picture. 

Unfortunately, too, these ultra- 
high frequencies needed for television 
cannot be transmitted over the same 
telephone cables which carry voice 
broadcasting, so that existing net- 
work systems will not suffice to dis- 
tribute television over the whole 
country. Each television transmit- 
ter will send only to its own horizon, 
and little beyond. 

Co-axial cable: open-wire 

New developments indicate, how- 
ever, the possibility of transmitting 
television signals over special forms 
of "co-axial cable" — hollow sheaths 
enclosing a central conductor. Ap- 
plication has been made by the A T & 
T Co. to lay such a cable from New 
York to Philadelphia for experi- 
mental use — primarily to conduct 
200 telephone conversations simul- 
taneously over a single wire. Over 
such a 1,000,000-cycle conductor a 
television picture would be transmit- 
ted easily. Experiments are also be- 
ing made in transmitting television 
images successfully over open-wire 
telephone circuits, particularly over 
pairs of wires mounted at the ends 
of 9-ft. or 11-ft. cross arms. But 
the open-wire lines have the disad- 
vantage of introducing external "in- 
terference" which may spot and blur 
the television picture. 

The only other alternative for get- 
ting television images across the 
country would be by a series of radio 
relay stations which would rebroad- 
cast the pictures from horizon to ho- 
rizon. But thousands of such sta- 
tions would be needed to duplicate 
the present wire networks. 

"It is going to come." 

"Obviously," declares David Sar- 
noff, president of the Radio Corpora- 
tion of America, "what this means is 
that, for national coverage, television 
must, at a tremendous cost, construct 
a network of its own ; or resort to the 
impractical method of setting up 
many thousand relay stations. But" 
— declares again Mr. Sarnoff — "we 
will do one or the other because we 



When Will We Really 
Have Television ? 

BBC Tests begin in England 
March 1 . . . New York City tests 
during 1936 . . . Limited to 30-mile 
radius . . . Experiments with cable 
for nets . . . "Lines," "frames" 
must be set . . . "Television will 
come." — Sarnoff. 

But two to four years before 
television service ready for nation. 
Meanwhile — Don't worry. Sell 
radio. 



are going to have television. The 
people in this country are demanding 
it and, as you may have noticed, 
whenever the public demands any- 
thing in the way of a service it gen- 
erally gets it." 

And, again, before television can 
come to the nation as a whole, those 
behind it must be mighty sure that 
the best system has been adopted for 
future development. The number of 
'lines" in the picture must be settled 
upon, because once adopted and tele- 
vision receivers sold and in use, 
changes in picture characteristics 
("lines," number of "frames" per sec- 
ond, method of synchronizing, etc.) 
will be almost impossible. 



Guarantee against 
obsolescence 

But as television experiments come 
more and more in the headlines and 
information about the New York field 
tests filters through to the public, 
radio purchasers are likely to become 
skeptical about buying ordinary radio 
sets at this time. Prospects for 1936 
sets may feel that they should wait 
until they can buy a complete tele- 
vision receiver — for "sight and 
sound." 

To offset this hurdle, it would be 
a smart move on the part of the radio 
industry if an "obsolescence guaran- 
tee" could be made to 1936 radio set 
buyers. Such a guarantee might 
cover the full amount paid by the 
purchaser for his radio receiver, of- 
fering to apply this on the purchase 
of a television receiver within a year 
or other period, at the option of the 
purchaser. 

Such an obsolescence guarantee 
would instill confidence on the part of 
the public, and might secure many 
immediate sales of radio sets which 
would be otherwise delayed or lost. 

Television is eventually going to 
come. Make no mistake about that. 

But television is a needless buga- 
boo when it is regarded as frighten- 
ing off sales of 1936 radio sets. 




Studio engineers using the iconoscope television camera for direct pick-up of 

actual scenes. The image is focussed on a photo-electric mosaic scanned by a 

cathode-ray beam electromagnetically controlled. 



December, 1935 



REMOVE THE HEADACHE FROM INVENTORY 

Practical plan for easy check-ups will 
keep you acquainted with your stock 



By H. L. M. CAPRON* 

* IN the conduct of any retail 
business, the control of stock is one 
of the most important factors in the 
ultimate success of that business. 

It is very desirable to maintain a 
stock large enough to offer a complete 
assortment of wanted merchandise for 
customer selection, and to provide 
immediate delivery from stock after 
sale — but it is also vitally important 
that the stock does not become too 
large, so as to impair working cap- 
ital — or become composed of slow or 
non-moving units so as to freeze cap- 
ital and incur serious losses in liqui- 
dation. 

In radio, where the factor of ob- 
solescence is more important than ir> 
most lines, and where seasonal models 
impose a penalty in big losses on 
large stocks at the end of the season, 
it is almost imperative that some real 



*For the past 14 years manager of one 
of the largest retail radio businesses 
in the world. 

vv.-VAv v'-v-v. ■•:«**"» 

-\\v^\v;vy.- ./-V \^f 

:■ ■ ■ .- : : : :-. ■:■ :■:■. ■ ■■..:■■ ■ ■■ ■ '■::■:.: .x,o :■,.;, -mi ..■:. ;....■■ . ■■ .;■■ .-Sk...'-..^.: :■ . .,::■,. ■,;■;■< ...:..; ■■.%:■ r&\,. :■:■■: • 

• •• • ^" ••• i 
■ ; ■ ■■• >n 

-" ^ ■'■.:•>•■ 

-.•.•.■•.■.• v 

:-■..,.- ■:-...■:■:::■::::■-..■:■::::■ ■■■:■:■ ^i.-:: ■ -.. - ■ ;' ■ -■ , -m- r-- :'.-.-:.-y-i -.: 

:- ■ ■:: ■■■.■:■:■:■■;-■.■■. "- ' ' "i ,-- .^v:*; J,,; " ■- 

■■::V-:...-v: W. ■ , ,■; ,■-■-(■&■ i:./ *.■:■ " 



stock control and buying guide be 
easily available, and the information 
constantly used. 

While it is impossible to prescribe 
a system in detail that will perfectly 
fit all stores' requirements, or will 
entirely replace judgment based on 
experience, the basic outline of a 
method that has been eminently suc- 
cessful in the control of both large 
and small radio stocks for a number 
of years will be presented. 

Watch the ratio 

The primary purpose is to main- 
tain a predetermined ratio of stock 
to sales, except for the factors of cur- 
rent availability of merchandise, and 
the approaching release of new mod- 
els, and to provide currently accurate 
information on the stock, and sales, 
by unit models and in total. 

As total sales volume increases, the 
necessary stock does not increase in 
proportion, for once the needed as- 
sortment has been provided, addi- 
tional sales require only an addition 




Photo by Ewing Galloway 

Check your stock according to what it is and what it should be and you'll have 
everything set for better control and more profit. 



to reserve stock, to be provided for 
immediate delivery to customers. 

The chart indicates the relation- 
ship of average dollar stock and an- 
nual dollar sales, based upon many 
years' actual experience. . 

If you select along the bottom scale 
the figure which represents your own 
dollar sales and then raise a vertical 
line until it intersects the average 
dollar stock line, you may then read 
on the right-hand scale what the 
model average stock is for your busi- 
ness. 

Assume, for example, that your an- 
nual sales volume is $25,000. The 
indicated model stock is $6,500 and 
the annual turnover is calculated to 
be 3.85. 

Abrupt change in the vicinity of 
$50,000 sales volume is due to the 
need for a greater assortment of re- 
ceivers for that size business. 

Weekly picture 

But this is only an annual picture, 
and while it is the starting point in 
our method of control, this picture 
alone serves no useful purpose in cur- 
rent control. 

To properly control your stock you 
must know what it should be and 
also what it is. 

Let us first determine what it 
should be. 

Take your sales of last year, week 
by week, and starting with January 
1st, or any other logical date, add 
them, week by week, so that for each 
week in the year you have two fig- 
ures : 

1. Sales for this week. 

2. Sales for all weeks to date. 
Then take your total annual sales 

and, with the chart, determine your 
proper model average stock. 

Now, divide your cumulative week- 
ly sales to date, week by week, by your 
model average stock, and the result 
will be a "turnover to date" figure 
for each week in the year. This is 
your control figure. 

Now take an actual inventory, at 
retail, and each week, add purchases 
at retail and subtract sales at retail. 
The result is your actual current 
stock. 

Add these weekly stock figures to- 
gether, and divide by the number of 



8 



Radio Today 



weeks. The result is average stock 
to date. 

Set your weekly total sales along- 
side your similar figures for last year 
and total them, week by week. The 
result is sales to date. This gives 
you an excellent week to week and 
year to date comparison with last 
year, and lets you constantly know 
how you stand on sales. 

Divide cumulative sales to date by 
average stock, week by week, as the 
year progresses, and the result is 
turnover to date, for direct compari- 
son with your identical figure for last 
year. 

If this turnover figure is less than 
last year, your stock is too large, and 
your current purchases must be less 
than current sales to bring your stock 
in line. 

Remove the surprises 

This turnover figure is the relation- 
ship between stock and sales and 
varies with changes in either, or both, 
so that if you maintain your planned 
figures, week by week, you will auto- 
matically adjust your stock to current 
sales, and at the end of the year there 
cannot be any surprises in your stock. 

Once you have put your turnover 
on schedule, weekly buying is done 
on the basis of actual sales. 

In a business of more than $25,000 
per year it is desirable to keep a unit 
stock and sales record by model, so 
that you may always know current 
stock and current rate of sale by each 
model in stock. 

When this unit control is used in 
conjunction with the dollar control 
method outlined above it is almost 
impossible for an intelligent operator 
to be confronted with the necessity 



of taking large markdown losses to 
move his stock, for he is constantly 
advised as to slow-moving models, 
and has cleared them from stock and 
ceased ordering long before they have 
become a menace to profits. 

The operation of this method is 
quite simple, and entails almost no 
expense, for it can become a by-prod- 
uct of the normal business records, 
and can profitably be employed by 
the smallest dealers, where the profits 
of an entire year can be wiped out 
by losses in inventory value, and 
where such losses bulk much larger 
than with a large dealer, where 
greater volume can spread the losses 
thinner. 

Fact or fancy? 

It is impossible, within the limited 
space of this article, to provide all of 
the detail involved in the installation 
and operation of a system even so 
simple as this one, or the means of 
procuring the needed data without 
expense. But it is a fact that this 
information is vital to the intelligent 
direction of a business. It is also 
a fact that the needed data is avail- 
able, whether you use it or 1 ot, and 
the problem is purely one of bringing 
the hidden information to the sur- 
face, and to your attention in such 
form as to make it useful. 

This can usually be done by minor 
changes in your forms or account 
books, and when done, will replace 
the fancies of your business with 
facts, as well as provide an excellent 
gauge for the quick and accurate 
measurement of the effectiveness of 
any changes in policy, practice, or 
sales promotional efforts. 

Given your specific problem, with 



the necessary data, Eadio Today will 
be glad to prescribe the details for 
you from the long practical experi- 
ence of its staff and contributors. 

In retailing, as in most other lines 
of endeavor, "Knowledge Is Power," 
and the knowledge in your own busi- 
ness should be used to its utmost. 



Will take 7 years to replace 
antiquated sets 

* At the present rate of 
selling radio receivers to the public, 
it will take , seven years to replace 
present antiquated sets, according to 
studies made by M. Clements, pub- 
lisher of Radio Today, who has writ- 
ten leading radio executives as fol- 
lows: 

"Take an estimate of 1935 gross 
sales — ours is 5,600,000 units. De- 
ducting 1,100,000 auto radio sets, 
600,000 exports and 550,000 battery 
sets, we have a total of approximately 
3,300,000 receivers sold to homes hav- 
ing electricity service. 

"This much is certain — if you di- 
vide this total into wired homes hav- 
ing radio, it follows that we are re- 
placing present sets only once every 
6 years! 

"The replacement cycle is still 
longer (seven years or more) if you 
take a lower estimate for '35 sales; 
if you allow a percentage of sales for 
the "second set" market; or if you 
credit some sales to new families or 
homes not previously having radio. 

"Even England is doing a relative- 
ly better job, with less than one-half 
our population. It will sell 1,750,000 
sets this year at a better profit margin 
than American manufacturers." 




If you will locate on the bottom scales the figure which represents your own annual sales volume in thousands of dollars, 
the figures at the sides of the charts will indicate what your average stocks should be. Both curves are based on many 
years of stock experience. The abrupt change at $50,000 is caused by need of a greater variety of models. 



December, 1935 



RECEIVERS TODAY 

1/126 models now on market, according 
to Langley report before radio engineers 



* "THE complete radio show of 
1935 would be a stupendous affair," 
commented Ralph Langley, consult- 
ing engineer and long-time analyst 
of the radio industry, in a report pre- 
sented before the Dec. 4 New York 
meeting of the Institute of Radio 
Engineers by John V. L. Hogan in 
Mr. Langley's absence. 

"For, so far this year, 1,126 dif- 
ferent models of broadcast receivers 
have been offered on the market. 
Viewed as a vast radio show, and al- 
lowing a minute for the examination 
of each model, it would take a week 
of long evenings to see them all!" 

While 1935's 1,126 receiver models 
represent a decrease below the 1,500 
figures of 1934 and 1933, it is, how- 
ever, an average of 11 models per 
manufacturer, and 3% new models 
per day, for every business day of the 
year. 

Mr. Langley sees evidence of stabil- 
ization of set design in this 1935 de- 
crease in models. In preceding years 
there was uncertainty as to what a 
broadcast receiver should be. But no 
basic changes occurred in 1935, and 
this and other evidence indicates that 



we are rapidly approaching general 
agreement among the engineers on 
the fundamental elements of the de- 
sign, so that the greater part of the 
effort can be spent in perfection of 
detail, and in completing the many 
lines of research that have been laid 
aside in the rush to build many 
models only slightly different from 
each other. 

Average price $73.11 

The price of broadcast receivers 
showed a healthy increase in 1934, 
and this increase stimulated, rather 
than retarded, sales; 1935 shows a 
further increase in average price, with 
every indication of a similar result. 

The average advertised price of 
broadcast receivers in 1935, computed 
on November 21 from all information 
then available, was $73.11. This is to 
be compared with the 1934 average 
of $59.60 and the 1933 average of 
$48.28. The price increase from 
1933 to 1934 was 22 per cent; the in- 
crease from 1934 to 1935 is slightly 
over 22 per cent. 

At the close of each year, the total 




Seventy-nine per cent of all the receiver models introduced in 1935, employed 

glass tubes exclusively, reports Analyst Langley. . Forty-seven per cent of the 

manufacturers used metal tubes in one or more models. 



retail value of the receivers is divided 
by the total number to obtain the 
average price at which they were sold. 
This figure was $34.39 for 1933 and 
$45.50 for 1934, showing an increase 
of 32 per cent, and on this basis it 
may be confidently predicted that the 
average price at which 1935 receivers 
are being sold will be very close to 
$55. 

5,500,000 sets in '35 

Mr. Langley predicted a year ago 
that 15 per cent more units would be 
sold in 1934 than had been sold in 

1933. When the figures were known, 
it turned out that the increase had 
been 19 per cent. It is more difficult 
to make a prediction for 1935, but the 
consensus of opinion at the time of 
writing seems to indicate an increase 
of about 17 per cent. This would 
give total sales of 5,500,000 units, and 
a retail value of $302,000,000, as 
against $200,390,000 for 1934. The 
record, of course, was made in 1929, 
when the total retail value was 
$592,000,000. 

In the matter of cabinet design, 
there was noted last year the apparent 
decline of the console type from 62 
per cent of all offerings in 1932 and 
55 per cent in 193-3 to 36 per cent in 

1934. In the year just past this trend 
has been much less marked, the con- 
sole amounting in 1935 to 33 per cent 
of all offerings. Much advertising 
emphasis, however, has been placed 
behind the console, and it is to be 
hoped that 1936 will see it again on 
the increase. The small chest or 
"cigar-box" type is passing out of the 
picture, declared Mr. Langley, only 
15 per cent of the models offered fall- 
ing in this category. 

Cabinets conservative 

Table models have increased in size 
and beauty as well as price and have 
more to recommend them than ever 
before. They account for 36 per cent 
of the offerings. The freak furniture 
models, with a few unimportant ex- 
ceptions, have pretty well disappeared. 
As a suggestion of possible future 
trends, we note the reappearance of a 
table type not seen for many years, 
in which the loud speaker is placed 
beside the chassis, rather than above 
it, and in which the cabinet is of 
more generous proportions. 

The design and finish of the cab- 
inets themselves are now almost en- 
tirely in the modern style, and in gen- 
eral along much more conservative 
and pleasing lines than in 1934. The 
glaring "moderns" of 1934 and earlier 



10 



Radio Today 



years, with their light-colored and 
strongly grain-marked veneers, are 
rapidly disappearing along with ar- 
chaic Queen Anne and spool-leg 
styles. Some very striking and ex- 
cellent examples of best modern style 
have appeared in 1935. 

There has been a noticeable decline 
in the number of phonograph com- 
binations. In 1934 25 per cent of the 
manufacturers included such models 
in their lines. In 1935 only 3.5 per 
cent of the offerings are combination 
models. 

There has been an increase in farm 
receivers, with operation either from 
a 32-volt line or from a 6-volt battery 
arranged to be kept charged by a 
wind-driven generator. Farm sets of 
these types were included in prac- 
tically all of the 1935 lines. 

Automobile receivers account for 
almost 12 per cent of the offerings, 
and it is anticipated that over 1,000,- 
000 of them will be sold, as against 
780,000 in 1934. 

AC-DC models up 

The AC-DC model is still increas- 
ing," perhaps because it is not only a 
solution of the problem of giving 
radio service for the least money, but 
also because a demand for it con- 
tinues in 85 large cities where irreg- 
ular DC areas still exist. In 1935 
20 per cent of the offerings were of 
this type. 

The average number of tubes per 
receiver for all 1935 receivers is un- 
changed from the six of 1934. The 
average in 1933, it will be recalled, 
was eight. 

The outstanding innovation in 1935 
was the introduction of a series of 
all-metal tubes. Although widely 
publicized and heralded as a revolu- 
tionary improvement in releases in- 
tended for the general public and 
probably of great commercial im- 
portance, it is generally conceded, ob- 
serves Mr. Langley, that they repre- 
sent a relatively minor forward step 
from the engineering point of view, 
keeping in mind that their successful 
manufacture in quantity was an out- 
standing accomplishment. They un- 
doubtedly indicate the direction in 
which radio-tube design will move in 
the next few years. 

One in four fails 

From an actuarial point of view, 
a radio manufacturing enterprise still 
seems to be a very poor risk. The 
death rate has never been less than 
20 per hundred — that is to say, at 
least one-fifth of the manufacturers 
in business in any one year have suc- 




The "great big dial" struck a popular note with the 1935 public, and the new 
style was followed by a number of designers. 



cumbed to some fatal financial mal- 
ady. This has been the sad fact year 
after year ever since 1923, and 1935 
proves to be no exception. In fact, 
the death rate shows an increase. Of 
the 110 firms who listed in 1934, 27 
did not reappear in 1935. Thus the 
death rate today stands at 25.4 per 
hundred. 

The birth rate, on the other hand, 
has been on the decline since 1931, 



and the number of receiver manufac- 
turers has been slowly shrinking. In 
1935 only 19 new firms appeared. At 
the close of 1934 the population of 
the industry was 110. Today, at the 
close of 1935, the number has fallen 
to 102, according to Mr. Langley's 
records. [Radio Today, however, finds 
140 firms now in business making or 
supplying trade-marked sets, as listed 
on page 20. — Editors.] 



FACSIMILE TODAY 



Two methods of facsimile operation 
have been discussed with the news- 
paper publishers. Under one plan, 
the facsimile service would be put on 
the existing broadcasting channels, 
and the operation of stations contin- 
ued during the early morning hours 
for delivering facsimile "morning 
newspapers." At present, millions of 
dollars' worth of transmitters, re- 
ceivers, etc., stand idle from 1 a.m. 
to 6 a.m., and this plan would utilize 
this idle equipment, although it would 
largely limit the use of facsimile to a 
once-a-day service through existing 
receiving sets with facsimile attach- 
ments. 

The second method contemplates 
putting facsimile service on separate 
short-wave channels of its own, so 
that facsimile transmission of printed 
pages, pictures, advertisements, maps, 
etc., could go on all day long. Advo- 



cates of this plan point out that with 
receiver chassis now available at fac- 
tory costs of $15 or thereabouts, 
whether or not a separate receiver is 
used is of little importance, since a 
separate special receiver might cost 
even less than fixing up the house- 
holder's existing set. But all-day and 
all-night facsimile service on the short 
waves would make available a new 
and complete "home printing press" 
service, which could be developed 
commercially on a wider scale than 
the restricted early-morning service. 
Experts who should know comment 
that facsimile is ready to spring as 
soon as the radio industry quits pussy- 
footing with the newspapers and 
makes up its mind that much can be 
gained and little lost by giving the 
public complete, fast, accurate and 
authoritative news service. It is 
coming — perhaps before television ! 



December, 1935 



11 



SELLING RADIO SETS ABROAD 

1936 export market bitter, but beautiful to crash 



* WHEN and if the American 
makers of radio sets are able to lo- 
cate a spot abroad where the squeam- 
ish nationalists are not standing on 
their borders waving a stop signal, 
they have a rich market. Foreigners 
like the simplicity, the eye-appeal, 
and the all-wave supremacy of Amer- 
ican receivers. 

American programs are devoured 
by the foreign public, particularly if 
they contain popular music. Euro- 
peans, for instance, have more in- 
terest in Hollywood than they have 
in Washington, D'. 0. (who hasn't?), 
and tbe broadcasts or the songs lifted 
from current cinemas have a huge 
pull for the continental radio fans. 
Features of the 1936 sets have stim- 
ulated this interest enormously, since 
the all-wave developments make the 
American hot-cha much less hard to 
get. 

Customer count 

After having waded wearily 
through the tangle of quotas, patent 
difficulties, and foreign exchange 
troubles. American manufacturers 
will manage to export this year an 
estimated total of nearly 600,000 sets 
— 584,000, to be exact. Foreign fans 
bought more American-designed sets 
than that, of course, since many of 
the big-time companies make their 
sets abroad. As was the case last 
year, Europe was the chief customer, 
with South America second. 

Grand total for receiver exports 
last year (1934) was 612,084, and it 
appears that the figure for 1935 will 
be below that. This does not mean 
that popular interest in our sets 
abroad is waning, since the activity 
of American radio factories abroad 
does not register in the export fig- 





Africa 

ures. However, the figure for Sept., 
1934, was 41,877, and for Sept., 1935, 
the total was 50,275. 

Dollar values 

Here are the 15 countries leading 
in dollar value of sets alone imported 
from the United States during the 
first 9 months of 1935, according to 
figures from the Dept. of Commerce : 

Union of South Africa. $1,076,428 

United Kingdom 1,040,506 

Mexico 873,223 

Brazil 872,651 

Spain 652,874 

Colombia 498,554 

Cuba 474,839 

France 327,577 

New Zealand 296,371 

Chile 260,545 

Portugal 245,862 

Peru 202,065 

Venezuela 181.623 

China 147.S99 

Sweden 99,907 

Notable shift in leading markets 
indicates that the leader continent, 
Europe, may lose her rank as a buyer 
of American radios in favor of ag- 
gressive states in South America, if 
present tendencies continue. It will 
be noted that as many South Amer- 
ican states are listed in the accom- 
panying table as European countries, 
although the latter continent main- 
tains its lead in the number of sets 
imported. 

Market intrigue 

Romantic Spaniards are likely 
buyers and the Spanish government 
never talks about matters of quota ; 



the only difficulty there is the ex- 
change rate. France has an obsession 
on the quota business, and the num- 
ber of receivers a distributor there 
may import often depends upon 
what the French big-shots had for 
breakfast. Amount of previous busi- 
ness enters in the situation, so that 
it is slow business for a fresh 
American importer to get a start 
there. In the Netherlands and in 
Sweden, the general market is tight- 
ened by patent rulings, and in Russia 
you can sell as many American sets 
as you like if you will take caviar 
in return. 



Equator selling 

South African market has its 
points. Set manufacturers are de- 
lighted with the discovery that in 
many parts of this area, the metal 
parts of a set cannot be kept from 
rusting due to the humid atmos- 
phere, and the replacement business 
thrives. Average price of sets 
marketed in this area is about $35. 
and the natives are sure to buy the 
set with the niftiest cabinet. 

In South America, the Brazilians 
are leading buyers, with Colombia 
and the Argentine also important. 
In all of these countries the big mis- 
sion of the radio promoters is to 
break down the old-world class dis- 
tinction, and convince the whole pop- 
ulation that a receiver is not just a 
luxury meant for the upper half. 



Unexpected angles 

Aviation is being developed in all 
parts of the world and American 
radio makers are getting fat orders 
from foreign cities and governments 




POPULATION -^ »so,000,000 
LISTENERS - 9,SS3,000 

U.S. SETS IMPORTED 41,900 



TV 



S* 



*<Lflk* 



Asia 



12 



Radio Today 




Mexico 

who need a batch of receivers for 
planes and landing fields. 

Direct selling to the consumer can 
stand developing in many of the for- 
eign areas. In these districts, no or- 
ganized attempts to go out and sell 
people are made by the radio repre- 
sentatives, and often sales are made 
to the consumer by the distributors 
themselves. Except in Europe, there 
are very few radio shows, and little 
promotional activity aimed at direct 
selling. 

Development of educational facili- 
ties in. other lands has been the signal 
for action on the part of makers of 
public address systems, and there is 
still a great deal of opportunity in 
this field. It should be remembered 
that foreign educators took to using 
motion pictures in their schools with 
very little encouragement, and that 
the use of amplifiers in the teaching 
of languages is not to be neglected. 

Reports from exporters indicate 
that foreign broadcasters are doing 
very well for themselves in the mat- 
ter of program building. Current 
broadcasts in darkest Africa are not 
as quaint as the Radio City gents 
might imagine, and local interest is 
gradually mounting. 



Canadian treaty results 

Results to the American radio in- 
dustry from the new reciprocal trade 
treaty with Canada are not import- 
ant, according to opinions received 
from both American and Canadian 
manufacturers by Bond Geddes, ex- 
ecutive vice president-general man- 
ager of the RMA. American parts 
and accessory manufacturers and, to 
some extent, tube manufacturers, 
however, promise to be the principal 
beneficiaries. Control of radio pat- 
ents in Canada prevent any substan- 
tial increase in receiving set sales by 
American manufacturers in Canada. 
American radio tubes may be sold 
in somewhat larger quantities al- 
though the tube patent situation in 
Canada also is a factor. 

The treaty provides a reduction in 
Canadian import rates from 30 per 



cent to 25 per cent ad valorem, or 
about one-sixth, on "electric wireless 
or radio apparatus and parts." 

This one-sixth reduction in the 
Canadian tariff on radio sets is not 
expected to materially increase 
American set sales in Canada. The 
Canadian set manufacturers are well 
protected by their radio patent 
license organization. Licenses of 
American manufacturers do not pro- 
vide for sales in Canada, where set 
manufacturers must secure separate 
Canadian licenses. Several Amer- 
ican manufacturers have virtually 
Canadian branch factories and these, 
together with Canadian set manu- 
facturers, will be benefited by their 
ability, under the new treaty, to se- 
cure cheaper American parts and ac- 
cessories. The reduced tariff on 
American radio parts and accessories, 
therefore, promises to be the principal 
result of the new treaty so far as 
the American industry is concerned. 



56,000,000 sets in world 

Over 56,000,000 radio sets, includ- 
ing 25,551,000 in the United States, 
are in use throughout the world, ac- 
cording to a world radio set census 
prepared by the Bureau of Eoreign 
and Domestic Commerce, U. S. De- 
partment of Commerce. Countries 
prominent in the use of radio in- 
clude England with 7,055,000 sets, 
Germany with 6,516,000 sets, Erance 
with 2,763,000 sets, and Japan with 
2,190,000. Other interesting details 
include the ownership of only twenty- 
five sets in Ethiopia and twenty-five 
in Greenland. Statistics on sales, ex- 
ports and imports of foreign coun- 
tries are also given in the report pre- 
pared by Andrew W. Cruse, Chief of 
the Electrical Division. 





POPULATION — - 8,548,000 
LISTENERS — 109,000 

U.S. SETS IMPORTED 16,2- 



Australia and New Zealand 

Mother India tunes in 

* A bronzed gentleman 
in India who runs the state of Hyder- 
abad and who has, in his way, got 
together one of the most dazzling 
bankrolls of our time, has made the 
impulsive decision to present 20,000 
radio sets to as many of his villages, 
and has had an agent in New York 
buying same. Receivers will be in- 
stalled, it is hoped, by Eebruary, so 
that the Hyderabad ruler may cele- 
brate the 25th anniversary of his 
reign in Radio City style. 

Hyderabad is the largest of 18 
states of India, containing some 14,- 
500,000 gaunt persons, who are thus 
to have their introduction to radio. 
Ambling about the rest of the empire 
are some 340,000,000 neighbors who 
may like the idea and start things. 

International 
broadcasting binge 

* Important broadcasting 
organizations the world over have 
been notified of a meeting in Paris, 
Eeb. 27, of the International Broad- 
casting Union, headquartered at 
Geneva, Switzerland. Union mem- 
bers are mostly European, but at this 
get-together the outsiders will be in 
on the negotiations aimed to stimu- 
late worldwide exchange of programs. 

Other matters to be considered are 
the complicated problems which def- 
initely have only an international 
solution : authors' rights, exchange of 
advance programs, interference, tran- 
scriptions and the creation of mutual 
understanding among nations. 

Neiv U. S. station for Ababa 

* State Department at 
Washington wants to be sure of a 
hook-up with the American Legation 
at Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in case an 
emergency cuts off the present com- 
munications. So four Navy experts 
have been sent to Ababa to erect a 
new short-wave station, which can re- 
lay messages through a battle ship or 
two, and through a commercial sta- 
tion at Madrid, Spain. 



December, 1935 



13 



fit 



ON THE 




Smashing progress during 1935 makes radio 
dealer the world's luckiest merchant 



• MAGNIFICENT manner in 
which the broadcasters entertained 
radio fans with thrill after thrill dur- 
ing the past year is reason enough 
why listeners may expect a richly va- 
ried spectacle on the air in 1936. 

Cost what it may, the studio gentry 
has repeatedly put on the air such a 
luxurious collection of features dur- 
ing the past year that the world of 
merchandising looks again to the 
radio receiver as the most remarkable 
item that a consumer can buy. 

Globe circlers 

Each of the breath-taking stunts 
staged by the broadcasters is another 
reason why a dealer in sets is a dealer 
in a service which has millions be- 
hind it. Eor a few dollars required 
to invest in a good receiver, the radio 
listener during the past year got in 
on plenty; here's a list of smash 
events from NBC and CBS. 

Premier Mussolini presented his 
version of the Italo-Ethiopian situa- 
tion, heard here in October . 

Speeches were broadcast from the 
U. S. Senate and House at the open- 
ing of the 74th Congress. 

Pioneer broadcast direct from the 
Coliseum in Rome on Easter Sun- 
day; high mass heard here. 

First-in-America broadcasts came 
early in the year on one network from 
China, Egypt, Monte Carlo, Luxem- 
burg, Pompeii, Poland, Bohemia, 
Yugoslavia, and Spain. 

From action centers 

Reichsftihrer Hitler explained from 
Berlin his stand on the Versailles 
Treaty at a time when the peace of 
the world appeared to depend on it. 

Philharmonic orchestra of New 
York hooked up with Finland to cele- 
brate the birthday of composer Sibe- 
lius. 

Survivors of the disaster of the 
S.S. Mohawh were interviewed on the 
air. 

Dramatic descriptive coverage of 
the violent dust storms in the West- 
ern States went on the air in a fea- 
ture broadcast. 

One network piled up a total of 72 
broadcasts from England during the 
year. 



Admiral Byrd's expedition was re- 
ported in detail from Little America, 
and the party was entertained at the 
outpost with special programs. 

Grand salute 

Marconi, the father of radio, was 
saluted on his 61st birthday via radio 
by ships at sea, by the Graf Zeppelin 
flying across the Atlantic, and by Ad- 
miral Byrd at the South Pole. 

First broadcast of canonization 
ceremonies led by Pope Pius May 19. 

King George V of England and 
Prime Minister MacDonald went on 
the air to celebrate the 25th anniver- 
sary of the King's reign, as greetings 
were heard from all parts of the Brit- 
ish Empire. 

Nothing too intricate 

Maiden voyage of the S.S. Nor- 
mandie was described on the air dur- 
ing the crossing and at her arrival in 
New York. 

World's first broadcast of Mt. Ve- 
suvius in action, broadcast from the 
crater itself, July 2. 

Haile Selassie, Ethiopian Emperor, 
went on the air with a special plea 
from Addis Ababa Sept. 13. 




At the center of Jack Benny Week. 



Radio salutes from naval vessels 
scattered around the world were 
broadcast to celebrate the 90th anni- 
versary of the U. S. Naval Academy 
Oct. 10. 

Sky adventure 

Record-smashing flight of the 
stratosphere balloon went on the air 
Nov. 11, linked with the China Clip- 
per on the Pacific coast and a Lon- 
don editor at his desk. 

Thirty-one different countries 
heard in one broadcast, "Youth Sings 
Across Borders" Oct. 27. 

WIP invades schools 

* Philadelphia Station 
WIP has worked up a couple of lively 
answers to educators who argue for 
further co-operation on the air waves. 
First is "Leisure Hour," a series of 
illustrated radio lectures for Monday 
afternoons, which co-operates with 
high schools in the Philadelphia dis- 
trict and was worked out with help 
from the Pennsylvania Arts and 
Sciences Society. Experts are en- 
gaged to speak on topics ranging from 
art tc aviation, while their voices are 
syneln onized with lantern slides. 

Other feature is the weekly broad- 
cast of assembly exercises from the 
Philadelphia schools, which proves to 
be interesting to parents, and to the 
assembly program builders. 

WBT eases epidemic 

* We-all must give due 
credit to William Schudt, Jr., presi- 
dent of Station WBT, Charlotte, N. 
C, for his part in relief measures 
which became necessary during the 
infantile paralysis epidemic which 
swept the two Carolinas. 

Many cities in the territory passed 
emergency ordinances to keep all 
children out of all public gatherings. 
Mr. Schudt's view: "It has become 
the mission of radio to take music, 
drama, and fun to these people at 
their firesides." WBT is the most 
.powerful station in the two states, and 
thus became leading factor in enter- 
tainment relief. 

Chart of Ethiopia, gratis 

■* A romantically colored 
giveaway item, called "Congo Bart- 
lett's Explorers' Map and Big Game 
Chart of Ethiopia" has been devel- 
oped as a plus merchandising feature 
for a quarter-hour electrically tran- 
scribed program by the Olesen Sound 
Studios of Hollywood. 



14 



Radio Today 




HURRY, TELEVISION! 




Studio beauties — now heard but not seen — may get a real 

break when television turns the corner. Top row (left) 

is Gale Page, who graces the Climalene Carnival on NBC, 

and Dorothy Lamour, dreamer-of-songs. 



Shown below are Alice Frost (left), a hit beauty singing 

with Bob Crosby; Betty Lou Gerson (center), a striking 

artist from "The First Nighters"; and the go-getter, Loretta 

Lee, on CBS networks. 



December, 1935 



15 



THE BUSINESS SIDE OF SERVICING 



John Rider points out importance of 
modern methods, up-to-date equipment 



By JOHN E. RIDER 

Service Editor, Radio Today 

* WE do not think it will be 
"telling tales out of school" if we 
speak about some of the items we 
hear discussed among groups of ser- 
vice men at service association meet- 
ings. Naturally, those things which 
are classified as "confidential" will not 
find space here — but there are cer- 
tain things which justify reflection in 
the public mirror. 

It is seldom that a meeting ends 
without a discussion of service equip- 
ment. Invariably, one man in a 
group will be a believer in the value 
of modern equipment. His opponents 
are numerous. They say : "Why buy 
new equipment — if what is now on 
hand can be made to do ?" — Maybe the 
equipment on hand is somewhat out- 
dated — but it can be used. So think 
the non-believers. 



Time 



is money 



Many service men rebel against the 
purchasing of new equipment because 
they feel that the expenditure is ac- 
tually forced upon them, as a result 
of circumstances normally beyond 
their control — as, for example, 
changes in receiver design and 
changes in tube design or the addition 
of new tubes. 

All of this is true, and it is one of 



the hazards of business, or at least 
is one of the hazards of every enter- 
prise where mechanical apparatus is 
used, and which mechanical apparatus 
must keep in step with technical ad- 
vancement in the industry. Increas- 
ing operating speed and efficiency is a 
paramount issue in every business. 

Geared to the times 

Instead of typing these lines, we 
could write them in longhand, but it 
would take much longer. ■ — The speed 
would be missing — and time is 
money. The typesetter employed by 
the printer would also require more 
time to set type from longhand than 
from typewritten copy. Increasing 
operating speed and efficiency reduces 
the cost of operations. Tens of mil- 
lions are spent each year with this one 
thought in mind. Concerns handling 
a large volume of business buy book- 
keeping machines because the opera- 
tion is faster than hand-written 
entries and, in general, results in 
more accurate operation. Inter-office 
communication systems are installed 
because they save wear and tear on 
the office staff and save the time and 
effort which would otherwise be re- 
quired for the men to go from one 
office to the other to ascertain infor- 
mation they wish to know. 

The servicing business, like any 




Nothing's wrong with this picture — Frank's Radio Service Dept., at Wallace, 

Idaho, is trim, pleasant, and complete. Chromium-plated instrument panel, parts 

cabinet, tube checker, and set tester are features. 



other business, has its own problems, 
and it is really difficult to find one 
piece of service apparatus which is not 
of definite utility to the servicing in- 
dustry and which — if given sufficient 
time — will not pay for itself. Rec- 
ognizing cost and that many men op- 
erate with greatly limited finances, 
the fact remains that, funds permit- 
ting, the acquisition of modern ap- 
paratus to replace obsolete equipment 
will be justified by increased effi 
ciency. Do not for one moment be- 
lieve that these statements are made 
with total disregard of all facts per- 
taining to existing conditions. Out- 
moded apparatus must be replaced by 
modern equipment. The set tester 
five years old and used in conjunction 
with a multiplicity of adaptors is 
not geared to modern times. The 
same is true of the tube checker. 

Fast-acting devices 

Sure — it is possible to improvise 
something to accommodate special 
tubes, but that is not the most prac- 
tical method of operation. The oscil- 
lator designed years ago and operative 
over the intermediate frequency band 
is still usable for the checking of all 
wave receivers, but it is neither as 
practical — as efficient — or prof- 
itable as a modern oscillator which 
supplies fundamental frequencies ex- 
tending from the intermediate band 
to the ultra-high-frequency band. The 
single-band oscillator will supply the 
required harmonics, at least most of 
them do . . . but there are numerous 
limitations . . . the adjustment of 
many receivers requires a fairly 
strong signal. The higher order of 
harmonics of some of the older oscil- 
lators are low in intensity, and it is 
difficult to secure the level required 
for proper operation — if a signal at 
all. . . . Then, again, time is required 
to establish the order of the harmonic 
being used. To juggle frequencies 
and to establish harmonics takes time, 
and, most certainly, is not as rapid 
or as efficient as the selection of the 
correct fundamental frequency within 
whatever band is required. 

Many men still operate with old 
and obsolete types of output meters, 
many of which are improvised. To- 
(To page 18) 



16 



Radio Today 



• 9 FEATURES make this your "BEST BUY" 
in a PORTABLE TUBE TESTER . . . it's the . . . 

DaWaD 

PORTABLE TUBE TESTER 




SERIES 27 

What do you demand of a tester? Flexibil- 
ity? Engineering for future tube develop- 
ments? Accuracy? Simplified Procedure? 
Compact size? Moderate price? 

Here's a DayraD "Portable" Series 27 
that has them all — plus the all-around re- 
liability and sturdiness that you expect in 
any Eadio Instruments bearing the DayraD 
trade name. 

As you read the 9 outstanding features 
listed below remember that this is the ONLY 
tester offering ALL of these features at any- 
where near this low price. 



DESIGNED TO PROVIDE COMPLETE TUBE CHECK AND 
QUICK POINT-TO-POINT ANALYSIS 



* 1. DAYEAD Micro Leak — shorts and leak- 

age tests, actually picks out noisy and 
leakv tubes that you previously could not 
find.' 

* 2. Shorts test between all elements that will 

prove to your customer why his set has 
been noisy and distorted. 

* 3. Only three controls, simplifying test pro- 

cedure, not necessary to make the numer- 
ous tests as previously to show your cus- 
tomer a defective tube. 

* 4. Calibrated to show a wide difference be- 

tween good and bad tubes — a DAYEAD 
feature. 



* 6. 



struction — high torque — jewel bearing— 
D'arsonval movement, no more worry 
about pivots loosening due to jarring. 

Will test all the METAL tubes plus the 
newly announced "G" tubes. 

A complete service unit in itself and can 't 
be beat at the price. 

Enclosed in leatherette carrying case. 

Eemember — DAYEAD — flexibility pro- 
vides for further types. 

SERIES 27 



ET TO 
EALER 



$ 



24. 



75 



Size 12xllx5y2" 
Weight 9 lbs. 



* 5. Meter designed with strong bridge con- 

Write jor complete catalogue and give Jobber's name 

The Radio Products Company 



123 Sunrise Place 



Subsidiary of Bendix Aviation Corp. 



Dayton, Ohio 



December, 1935 



17 



BUSINESS OF SERVICING 

(From page 16) 

day's receivers require modern, fast- 
acting equipment. The adjustment of 
trimmer units is oftentimes so critical 
that peak adjustment positions for 
maximum efficiency operation are ac- 
tually passed without having noted 
any change upon the indicating in- 
strument. In this connection, the 
cathode-ray oscillograph is the most 
modern piece of equipment. 

Perhaps you feel that we think of 
nothing but work — work, every min- 
ute of the day ! . . . If so, we do not 
agree. Up-to-date equipment will, by 
providing the station operator with 
more efficient means of handling his 
jobs, enable more work to be done in 
a shorter period of time — increase 
operating capacity, and will provide 
more leisure — a vital necessity to 
every man. 

It is not a matter of time alone. 
Accuracy of the test being made is 
also important. After all is said and 
done, the conclusions reached are 
based upon the information gleaned 
as a result of the test. Equipment 
improvised on the spot is invariably 
full of faults. The time required to 
improvise testing systems in order to 
make certain tests occasioned by the 
more advanced design of radio re- 
ceivers is seldom, if ever, productive 
of the required accuracy. . . . There 
is real value in modern equipment. 



WANTED-A PHOBIA CHASER 

* WE are all creatures of habit. 
Witness the plight of the charming 
gentleman with whom we lunched to- 
day ... he is a suburbanite . . . his 
income is in the upper brackets. He 
drives a Pierce-Arrow car. . . . You 
will find out why we mention this 
point. 

When this gentleman calls and sug- 
gests that we lunch together we get 
suspicious — for without fail, he is 
seeking clinical advice about his sick 
radio. We were right in our assump- 
tion — sure enough, our friend had a 
problem. He has five radios in his 
home — yes, five. . . . The cook must 
have one in the kitchen, Daughter 
must do her "Bing Crosbying" in the 
seclusion of her boudoir, Mother must 
have a receiver for her cultural pro- 
grams, and Son is a Short-Wave Bug. 
Father is content to listen to the large 
receiver which, is in the living room — 
BUT — it is an extremely sensitive 
receiver, and there isn't much use in 




"No, Lady, I don't know what makes 
the oil-burner squeak." 

trying to get the thing to give satis- 
factory results without a proper an- 
tenna system. So, between the sand- 
wich and the coffee, he dumped his 
problem in our lap — and we told him 
to get a competent service man to in- 
stall the latest type of aerial. . . . 
Then he asked us this poser — "How 
do I know that my local man is com- 
petent ?" 

Now for the reason why we mention 
the gentleman's Pierce-Arrow car. 

Local service man 

For years, our friend has been 
bringing his car to the local service 
station for the various jobs which a 
car needs every once in a while. He 
has been charged small sums each 
time . . . however, satisfaction was 
seldom obtained. — After each such 
local service he was forced to bring 
his car into the Pierce-Arrow service 
station in New York for a properly 
completed job . . . and had been 
charged sums commensurate with the 
eminently satisfactory services per- 
formed. 

Living about sixty miles from New 
York, he continued visiting his local 
auto repair man in sheer desperation 
and the hope that he could avoid the 
trip to New York. . . . The result — 
a phobia, that impugned the ability 
of the auto repair man in his vicinity, 
and developed confidence only in those 
service stations which were under the 
direct supervision of the automobile 
manufacturer. 

Now he needs radio service. . . . 
Whom should he call? . . . He has no 
confidence in the local radio talent — 
for, according to him, all local inde- 



pendent repair men are brothers under 
the skin. . . . Can you blame him? 
After all, he has learned from years of 
experience. 

Here is a potential customer for 
at least $15 to $20 worth of service 
work immediately and for at least $50 
more during 1936 — who comes to 
New York to ask the address of a 
competent service man. . . . He even 
thinks of importing a recommended 
service man to do his work, and this 
means paying for 120 miles of travel- 
ing time. 

This case must be duplicated many 
thousand times each year. . . . What's 
the answer — you Knights of the 
Soldering Iron? 

HOW MUCH MONEY? 

* There is a story ram- 
pant in the middle West that servic- 
ing has boomed. The reason seems 
pretty logical. Maybe some of the 
readers of this column can verify or 
dispute the statements. Jobbers and 
manufacturers seem to concur in the 
opinion that there was a boom. It 
seems as if there has been a boom in 
the sale of electrolytic condensers 
during the past summer. . . . This by 
no means casts any reflections upon 
the products of any of the electrolytic 
condenser manufactures, because all 
have done well. Men intimately ac- 
quainted with what has been taking 
place, claim that an excessive amount 
of sustained high humidity was re- 
sponsible for the high degree of re- 
placement. Such an occurrence is 
not beyond the realm of possibility. 
After all, no one has ever claimed 
that their electrolytic condenser was 
perfect and guaranteed for a definite 
life under ANY and ALL condi- 
tions. . . . 

"Profitably busy" 

The important question remains to 
be answered. . . . How much money 
was made during this activity? . . . 
Is it possible that large quantities of 
such condensers were sold by the 
manufacturer to the jobber and by 
the jobber to the serviceman — -and 
by the serviceman to the set owner — 
with profit only at two points — 
namely the manufacturer to jobber 
and jobber to serviceman. . . . Being 
busy and being profitably busy are 
two different things. . . . The latter 
should be the greatest concern of the 
industry. . . . Let us hope that such 
an opportunity did not go by the 
board. . . . After all the real honest 
to goodness, condenser-wrecking hu- 
midity does not come weekly! 



18 



Radio Today 



SHORT-WAVE BROADCASTS 



Compiled by Radio Today to help sell all-wave sets 

World-wide winter schedule 1935-1936 



Country 
or City 



Russia 
Venezuela 
Venezuela 
Vatican City 
Mexico 



Russia 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Germany 

Boston 

Panama 

England 

Philadelphia 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 

Italy 

Bolivia 

Canada 

Chicago 

New York 

England 

New York 

Java 

Pittsburgh 

Portugal 

Canada 

Venezuela 

Colombia 

New York 

Venezuela 

Ecuador 

Ecuador 

Mexico 

Switzerland 

Cuba 

Brazil 

England 

Australia 

Schenectady 

Germany 

Germany 

India 

Springfield 

Australia 

England 

Australia 

Philadelphia 

Switzerland 

Portugal 

Italy 

Italy 

Spain 

Belgium 

Japan 

Canada 

France 

Colombia 

Holland 

England 

Boston 

Italy 

New York 

England 

Pittsburgh 

France 

Russia 

Africa 

Japan 



Vatican City 

England 

Germany 

Pittsburgh 

Holland 

France 

England 

New York 

Germany 

Schenectady 

Hungary 

Germany 

Holland 

New York 

England 

Pittsburgh 



Call Wavelength 
letters in meters 

50 to 80 meters 



RW15 

YV2RC 

YV5RMO 

HVJ 

XECW 

40 to 50 

RW59 
XEBT 
COCO 
DJC 
W1XAL 
HP5B 
GSA 
W3XAU 
W8XAL 
W9XAA 
I2RO 
CP5 
CRCX 
W9XF 
W3XAL 
GSL 
W2XE 
YDA 
W8XK 
CSL 
CJRO 
YVSRC 
HJ1ABB 
W3XAL 
YV6RV 
PRADO 
HC2RL 
XECR 
30 to 40 
HBP 
COCH 
PRF5 
GSB 
VK3ME 
W2XAF 
DJN 
DJA 
VUB 
W1XAZ 
VK3LR 
GSC 
VK2ME 
W3XATJ 
HBL 
CT1AA 
I2RO 
IRU 
EAQ 

20 to 30 

ORK 

TVM 

CJRX 

FYA 

HJ4ABA 

PHI 

GSD 

WX1AL 

I2RO 

W2XE 

GSE 

W8XK 

FYA 

RW59 

CNR 

JVH 

10 to 20 

HVJ 

GSF 

DJB 

W8XK 

PCJ 

FYA 

GSI 

W2XE 

DJQ 

W2XAD 

HAS3 

DJE 

PHI 

W3XAL 

GSG 

W8XK 



70.2 
51.7 
51.3 
50.2 
50.1 

meters 

50.0 
50.0 
49.9 
49.8 
49.7 
49.7 
49.5 
49.5 
49.5 
49.3 
49.3 
49.3 
49.0 
49.2 
49.2 
49.1 
49.0 
49.0 
48.9 



48.8 
48.8 
46.5 
46.3 
46.1 
45.3 
45.0 
40.6 

meters 

38.5 

31.8 

31.6 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31. 

31.3 

31.2 

31.1 

30.5 

30.4 

meters 
29.0 
27.9 
25.6 
25.6 
25.6 
25.6 
25.5 
25.4 
25.4 
25.4 
25.3 
25.3 
25.2 
25.0 
23.4 
20.5 

meters 

19.8 
19.8 
19.7 
19.7 
19.7 
19.7 
19.6 
19.6 
19.6 
19.6 
19.5 
16.8 
16.9 
16.9 
16.9 
13.9 



Frequency 
in kilocycles 



4,270 
5,800 
5,850 
5,970 
5,990 



6,000 
6,000 
6,010 
6,030 
6,040 
6.040 
6,050 
6,060 
6,060 
6,080 
6,080 
6,080 
6,090 
6,100 
6,100 
6,110 
6,120 
6,120 
6,140 
6,150 
6,150 
6,150 
6,450 
6,430 
6.520 
6.630 
6,670 
7,380 



7,800 
9,430 
9,500 
9,510 
9,510 
9,530 
9,540 
9,560 
9,560 
9,570 
9.580 
9,580 
9,590 
9,590 
9,590 
9,600 
9,630 
9,830 
9,860 



10,330 
10,740 
11,720 
11,720 
11,710 
11,730 
11,750 
11,790 
11,810 
11,830 
11,860 
11,870 
11,880 
12,000 
12.830 
14,600 



15,120 
15,140 
15,200 
35,210 
15,220 
15,240 
15,260 
15,270 
15.280 
15,330 
15,370 
17,760 
17,770 
17,780 
17,790 
21,540 



Stations compiled from the lists of Service Bureau, 
Radio Manufacturers Association, 1317 F. St., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. Detailed program lists issued 
weekly for newspaper publication (free) by the 
RMA Service Bureau. 



A. M. NEW YORK TIME NOON 
2 4 6 8 10 12 



E.S.T. 
6 



P.M. 
10 



MbN 



£XC. 1-U&: TMUR 



eye. 



£.<C. 



WED. 



s-y/v 



77// r. 7 "//£/?. 



7i/.r. T//Ofir 



AC. 



S,1T- 



sxc /np/i- vt 



w,?o. 



BXc.Tqe. 
su/y. 



&07V. 



~xc 



£4£ 



SUN 



TA/t//?S/l7 



TUB . 



ED 



MON.V'BD 



FR, 



/RflEpUl AH 

so\v 



SAT- 

ext. sua- 



S.lT- 



SAT. SUH- 



UN. 



TUB. 



THilR. 



SAT. 



TLB. THL'R 



SAT 



ISA 



SAT 



THUp. 



XC 



SUN 



DAILY 



For Central Time subtract one hour from that given at top of chart (E. S. T.)Write new 
hours in white space above. For Mountain Time subtract two hours. For Pacific 
Time subtract three hours. For Greenwich (England) Mean Time add five hours. 



December, 1935 



19 



WHO'S WHO, AND WHERE TO BUY 

Radio Today's directory of radio products — the first complete buy- 
ing guide to be made available for the radio trade in eight years 



Boonton, 



INC., 27 
Y., "Air 



RECEIVING SETS 

Amateur — AM 

Commercial — COM 

Farm and battery — F 

Home— H 

Radio-phonograph combination — RP 

Auto — A 

ACEATON E — Federated Purchasers, 
Inc. 

ADMIRAL — Continental Radio & Tele- 
vision Corp. 

ADMIRAL — Radio Products Corp. 

AERONAUTIC— Mission Bell Radio 
Mfg. Co., Inc. 

AIRCRAFT RADIO CORP., 
N. J.— COM 

AIR KING PRODUCTS CO., 
Hooper St., Brooklyn, N. 
King" — H 

AIR LINE — Montgomery Ward & Co. 

ALLIED RADIO CORP., 833 W. Jack- 
son Blvd., Chicago, 111., "Knight" — 
A, F, H — See adv. p. 3S 

AMERICAN — G e n e r a 1 Television & 
Radio Corp. 

AMERICAN SALES CO., 44 W. 18th St., 
New York City— AM, H 

AMERICAN-BOSCH— United American 
Bosch Corp. 

AMPLEX RADIO CORP., 240 W. 23rd 
St., New York City — H 

F. A. D. ANDREA, INC., 48-02 48th Ave., 
Woodside, N. Y., "Andrea" — A, H — 
Export only 

ANSLEY RADIO CORP.. 240 W. 23rd 
St., New York City, "Ansley Dyna- 
phone" — RP 

ARCADIA— Wells-Gardner & Co. 

ARVIN — Noblitt-Sparks Industries 

ATWATER KENT MFG. CO., 4700 Wis- 
sahickon Ave., Philadelphia, Penna., 
"Atwater Kent" — A. F, H, RP — See 
adv. back cover 

AUTOCRAT RADIO CO., 3855 N. Ham- 
ilton Ave., Chicago, 111., "Autocrat," 
"Meritone" — A, F, H, RP 

AUTOMATIC RADIO MFG. CO.. 112 
Canal St., Boston, Mass., "Automatic," 
"Tom Thumb" — A, H 

BALKEIT RADIO CORP., 549 W. Ran- 
dolph St., Chicago, 111., "Balkeit" — 
A, F, H 

BELMONT RADIO CORP., 1257 Fuller- 
ton Ave., Chicago, 111., "Belmont," 
"Freshman Masterpiece" — A. F, H 

BERKSHIRE CO., 130 N. Wells St., 
Chicago, 111. — A, H 

BRETING RADIO MFG. CO., 2177 Ven- 
ice Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif., "Bret- 
ing" — H 

BROWNING 35 — Tobe Deutschmann 
Corp. 

CAPEHART CORP., E. Pontiac St., 
Fort Wayne, Ind., "Capehart" — RP 

CAPITOL RADIO CO., 43 E. Ohio St., 
Chicago, 111., "Capitol," "Mayfair" — 
A, H 

CASE ELECTRIC CORP., 1307 S. Mich- 
igan Ave., Chicago, 111., "Case," 
» Radiovogue," "Tell-Tlme" — H — See 
adv. p. 26 

CAVALCADE CO., 271 7th St., San Fran- 
cisco, Calif., "Cavalcade" — A, H 

CAVALCADE RADIO CO., 2341 Wolf- 
ram St., Chicago, 111., "Cavalcade" 



*The entire contents of this radio 
directory are copyrighted (1935) by 
Caldwell-Clements, Inc., publishers of 
RADIO TODAY. Contents must not be 
reprinted in whole or part without per- 
mission of the publishers. 



CHAMPION RADIO LABORATORIES, 
14553 Madison Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, 
"Champion," "Victory" — A, H 
CHAMPLAIN — L i n c o 1 n International 

Instrument Co. 
CHANTICLEER RADIO CO., 1728 Ven- 
ice Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif., "Chan- 
ticleer" — H 
CLARION— T ransformer Corp. of 

America 
CLINTON MFG. CO., 1217 W. Washing- 
ton Blvd., Chicago, 111. 
COLONIAL RADIO CORP., 254 Rano 

St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
COM-RAD — Commonwealth Radio Mfg. 

Co. 
COMMONWEALTH RADIO MFG. CO., 
4848 Lincoln Ave., Chicago, 111., 
"Com-Rad" — H 
CONSOLIDATED RADIO PRODUCTS 
CO., Box 23, Nothwestern Station, 
Detroit, Mich., "Royal" — A, F, H 
CONTINENTAL RADIO &. TELEVISION 
CORP., 325 W. Huron St., Chicago, 
111., "Admiral" — F, H 
CORONA RADIO & TELEVISION 
CORP., 402 Sacramento Blvd., 
Chicago, 111., "Corona," — A, H 
CROSLEY RADIO CORP., 1329 Arling- 
ton St., Cincinnati, Ohio, "Crosley" — 
A, F, H — See adv. p. 1 
DELCO — United Motors Service 
DETROLA RADIO CORP., 3630 W. 
Fort St., Detroit, Mich., "Detrola" — 
A, F, H 
TOBE DEUTSCHMANN CORP., Canton, 
Mass., "Browning 35," "Tobe Tuner" 
— AM, H — Kits only 
DE WALD — Pierce Airo, Inc. 
DOERLE — Radio Trading Co. 
EAGLE RADIO CO., 84 Cortlandt St., 

New York City, "Eagle" — AM 
EASTERN RADIO SPECIALTY CO., 
1845 Broadway, New York City, 
"Peak" — AM 
ECHOPHONE RADIO CORP., 2611 S. 
Indiana Ave., Chicago, 111., "Echo- 
phone" — A, H 
ELECTRICAL RESEARCH LABORA- 
TORIES, INC., 2222 Diversey Pky., 
Chicago, 111., "Erla," "Sentinel". — 
A, F, H, RP 
EL RAY RADIO MFG. CO., 8406 Vz S. 
Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif., "El 
Ray"— H 
EMERSON RADIO & PHONOGRAPH 
CORP., Ill Sth Ave., New York City, 
"Emerson" — A, F, H 
EMPIRE RADIO CORP., 1217 W. Wash- 
ington Blvd., Chicago, 111., "Empire," 
"General," "Royal" — A, H 
ENSIGN— Espey Mfg. Co. 
ERLA — Electrical Research Labora- 
tories, Inc. 
ESPEY MFG. CO., 124 E. 25th St., New 
York City, "Ensign ," "Espey," 
"Yorker" — F, H, RP 
FADA RADIO & ELECTRIC CO.. 30-20 
Thompson Ave., Long Island City, 
N. Y., "Fada" — A, H 
FAIRBANKS-MORSE , HOME APPLI- 
ANCES, INC., 430 S. Green St., 
Chicago, 111., "Fairbanks-Morse" — 
A, F, H 
FEDERATED PURCHASERS, INC., 25 
Park Place, New York, N. Y., "Acra- 
tone" — A, F, H, RP 
FERGUSON RADIO CORP., 745 Broad- 
way, New Y'ork City 
FISCHER-SMITH, 162 State St., W. 
Englewood, N. J., "Fischer-Smith" 
— A 
FORDSON RADIO EXPORT CO., 8780 

Grand River, Detroit, Mich. — A, H 
FREED-EISEMANN— Freed Mfg. Co. 
FREED MFG. CO., 44 W. 18th St., New 
York City, "Freed-Eisemann" — H — 
See adv. p. 39 



FRESHMAN MASTERPIECE.— Belmont 
Radio Corp. 

GALVIN MFG. CORP., 847 W. Harri- 
son St., Chicago, 111., "Motorola" — A 

GAROD RADIO CORP., 34 E. 12th St., 
New York City, "Garod" — -H, RP 

GAYLORD MFG. CO., 1227 Washington 
Blvd., Chicago, 111., "Gaylord" — A, 
COM, H, RP 

GENERAL — Ross Distributing Co. 

GENERAL — Empire Radio Corp. 

GENERAL, — General Television & Radio 

Corp. 
GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 1285 Bos- 
ton Ave., Bridgeport, Conn., "General 

Electric" — A, H, RP 
GENERAL HOUSEHOLD UTILITIES 

CORP., 2638 N. Crawford Ave.. 

Chicago, 111., "Grunow" — F, H 
GENERAL MOTORS— United Motors 

Service 
GENERAL TELEVISION & RADIO 

CORP., 267 W. 17th St., New York 

City, ''American,'' "General," 

"Greeley" — H 
GILFILLAN BROS., INC., 1815 Venice 

Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif., "Gilflllan" 

—A, AM, E, H, RP 
GOLDENTONE RADIO MFG. CORP., 

4181 Oakman Blvd., Detroit, Mich., 

"Goldentone" — A, H 
GREBE RADIO & TELEVISION CO., 

55 W. 42nd St., New York City, 

"Grebe" — H, RP 

GREELEY— G e n e r a 1 Television & 

Radio Corp. 
GRIGSBY-GRUNOW CO., c/o Frank M. 

McKey, 5S01 Dickens Ave., Chicago, 

111., "Majestic" — Replacement parts 

only — See adv. p. 40 

GROSS RADIO, INC., 51 Vesey St., New 

Y r ork City— AM 
GRUNOW — General Household Utili- 
ties Corp. 
HALLIORAFTERS, INC., 1735 Belmont 

Ave., Chicago, 111., "Skyrider" — AM 
HALSON RADIO MFG. CORP., 120 E 

16th St., New York City, "Halson" — H 
HAMMARLUND MFG. CO., 424-438 W 

33rd St., New York City, AM, COM 
HARVEY RADIO LABORATORIES, 12 

Boylston St., B r o o k 1 i n e . Mass., 

"Harvey transceiver" — AM 
HI-LO RADIO CO., 4611 N. Clark St 

Chicago, 111., "Hi-Lo" — H 
HERBERT H. HORN, 1201 Olive St., 

Los Angeles, Calif., "Tiffany Tone" 

— A, H, RP 
HOWARD RADIO CO., 1731 Belmont 

Ave., Chicago, III., "Howard" — A, H— 

See adv. p. 44 

ICA EXPORT CO., 154 Nassau St., New 
Y'ork City, "ICA" — A, H 

INTERNATIONAL KADETTE— Inter- 
national Radio Corp. 

INTERNATIONAL RADIO CORP., 4th 
& William Sts„ Ann Arbor, Mich., 
"International Kadette," "Kadette" 
— lA, F, H — See adv. p. 2 

IRWIN RADIO CO., 461T Corliss Ave., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
JACKSON BELL— Peter Pan Radio Mfg. 

Co. 
KADETTE — International Radio Corp. 
KARADIO CORP., 50 11th Ave.. N.E., 

Minneapolis, Minn., "Karadio" — A 

KINGSTON RADIO CO., Kokomo, Ind.. 

"Kingston" — H 
KING TRADING CO., 51 Vesey St., 

New York City — H 
KNIGHT— Allied Radio Corp. 
LAFAYETTE RADIO MFG. CO.. INC 

100 Sixth Ave., New York City, 

"Lafayette" — A, AM, F, H, RP 
LA SALLE — Stuyvesant Electric Co. 



20 



Radio Today 



LA SALLE PRODUCTS CO., 140 Wash- 
ington St., New York City, "La Salle" 
— H, EP 

LAUREHK RADIO MFG. CO., Adrian, 
Mich., "Laurehk" — A, F, H 

LEAR DEVELOPMENT CO., 121 W. 
17th St., New York City, "Lear-O- 
Scope" — COM 

LEAR-O-SCOPE — Lear Development 
Co. 

LEHMAN RADIO SALON, INC.. 1013 
Madison Ave., New York City, "Port- 
O-Matic" — RP 

LEOTONE RADIO CO., 63 Dey St., 
New York City, "Leotone" — AM 

LINCOLN INTERNATIONAL INSTRU- 
MENT CO., 47-02 5th St., Long Island 
City, N. Y., "Champlain" — A, H, RP 

LIONEL RADIO CORP., 431 E. 104th St., 
New York City — A, H 

D'TATRO PRODUCTS CORP., 417 W. 
"Water St., Decorah, Iowa, "L'Tatro" 
— F 

LUXOR RADIO CORP., 521 W. 23rd St., 
New York City, H 

MAJESTIC — Grigsby-Grunow Co. 

MASTERPIECE — McMurdo Silver Corp. 

MAYFAIR — Capitol Radio Co. 

MERCEDES PRODUCTION CO.. 2235 
Irving Pk., Chicago, 111., "Mercedes" 
— A, H, RP 

MERITONE — Autocart Radio Co. 

MIDWEST RADIO CORP., 909 Broad- 
way, Cincinnati, Ohio, "Midwest" 

MISSION BELL RADIO MFG. CO., INC., 
833 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif., 
"Aeronautic," "Mission," "Silvertone," 
"Trudial" — A, H 

MONTGOMERY WARD & CO., Chicago. 
111., "Air Line" — A, F, H 

MOTOROLA — Galvin Mfg. Corp. 

MOTORVOX CO.. 920 Broadway, New 
York City — H 

NAMCO MFG CO.. INC., 142 W. 26th St., 
New York City 

NATIONAL CO., 61 Sherman St.. Mai- 
den, Mass., "National" — AM, COM 

NOBLITT-SPARKS INDUSTRIES, Co- 
lumbus, Ind., "Arvin" — A, H 

PACIFIC RADIO CORP., 844 W. Adams 
St., Chicago, 111., "Pacific" — F, H 

PACIFIC RADIO CORP., 1479 W. Adams 

Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif., "Jackson 

Bell," "Westone" — A, H, RP 
PACKARD BELL RADIO CO., 1320 S. 

Grand Ave., Los Angeles, Calif., 

"Packard Bell," — H 
PARAMOUNT — Try-Mo Radio Co. 

PATHE RADIO & TELEVISION CO., 
1401 W. 11th St., Los Angeles, Calif., 
"Pathe"— H, RP 

PATTERSON RADIO CO., 1320 S. Los 

Angeles Ave., Los Angeles, Calif- 

"Patterson" — AM, H 
PEAK — Eastern Radio Specialty Co. 
PETER PAN RADIO MFG. CO., 1487 W. 

Adams St., Los Angeles, Calif., "Jack- 
son Bell," "Peter Pan' — H 
PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORP., 

Tioga & C Sts., Philadelphia, Pa., 

"Philco" — A, F, H — See adv. inside 

hack cover 
PHILMORE MFG. CO., 113 University 

Place, New York City, "Philmore"— 

AM, H 
PIERCE AIRO, INC., 510 6th Ave., New 

York City, "De Wald" — A, H 
PILOT RADIO CORP., 37-06 36th St., 

Long Island City. N. Y., "Pilot" — 

F, H, RP 
PLAZA RADIO CO., 260 5th Ave., New 

York City 
PORTO-O-MATIC— L ehman Radio 

Salon, Inc. 
POWERTONE — Try-Mo Radio Co. 
PROMPT RADIO SERVIC E — see 

Try-Mo Radio 
RADIOBAR CO. OF AMERICA, 7100 

McKinley St., Los Angeles, Calif., 
"Radiobar" — H 
RADIO MFG. ENGINEERS, 306 First 

Ave., Peoria, 111., "HIE" — AM 
RADIO PRODUCTS CORP., 618 W. Elm 

St., Chicago, 111., "Admiral" — H 
RADIOTONE RECORDING CO., 6109 
Melrose St., Los Angeles, Calif. — RP 

RADIO TRADING CO., 99 Hudson St., 
New York City, "Doerle," "Twinplex" 
— H, AM 



RADIO TRANSCEIVER LABORA- 
TORIES, 86-27 115th St., Richmond 
Hill, N. Y., "Radio Transceiver Labo- 
ratories" — AM, COM 

RADIOVOGUE — Case Electric Corp. 

RADOLEK CO., 601 W. Randolph St., 
Chicago, 111., "Radolek" — >A, F, H — 
See adv. p. 40 

RCA MPG, CO., INC., Front & Cooper 
Sts., Camden, N. J., "RCA Victor" — 
A, COS!, F, H, RP — See adv. p. 22 

RAWLINGS RADIO MFG. CO., 721 S. 
Broadway, Los Angeles, Calif., "Raw- 
lings" — H 

RCA VICTOR— RCA Mfg. Co., Inc. 

REMINGTON RADIO & TELEVISION 
CORP., 1477 W. Adams Blvd., Los 
Angeles, Calif., "Remington" — H 

REMLER CO., LTD., 2101 Bryant St., 
San Francisco, Calif., "Remler" — A, H 

REPUBLIC INDUSTRIES. 75 West St., 
New York City, "Sky Hawk" — H 

REXTRON RADIO CORP., 1217 W. 

Washington Blvd.. Chicago. 111., "Rex- 

tron" — H 
RME — Radio Mfg. Engineers 
A. H. ROSS & CO., Keswick Ave. & 

Waverly Rd., Glenside. Pa., "Ross" 

— AM 

ROSS DISTRIBUTING CO., 2020 Chan- 
cellor St., Philadelphia, Pa., "Gen- 
eral," "Sterling" — A, H 

ROYAL — Consolidated Radio Products 
Co. 

ROYAL — Empire Radio Corp. 

ROYALE RADIO MFG. CO., 1417 W. 

Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif., 

"Royale"— H 
SAVIL RADIO ENGINEERING CORP 

71-73 Grand St.. New York City 
E. H. SCOTT RADIO LABORATORIES, 

4450 Ravenswood Ave.. Chicago, 111., 

"Scott" — H 

SEARS ROEBUCK & CO., Philadelphia. 
Pa., "Silvertone" — A, F, H 

SENTINEL — Electrical Research Labo- 
ratories 

SETCHELL-CARLSON MFG. CO., 2233 
University St., St. Paul, Minn. — F 

McMURDO SILVER CORP., 3354 N. 
Paulina St., Chicago, 111., "Silver," 
"Masterpiece" — AM. COM, H, RP 

SILVER MARSHALL MFG. CO.. 3001 
Southport Ave., Chicago, 111.. "Silver 
Marshall" — H 

SILVERTONE— M i s s i o n Bell Radio 
Mfg. Co. 

SILVERTONE— Sears R6ebuck & Co. 



SIMPLEX RADIO CO., Sandusky, Ohio, 

"Simplex" — A, AM, H 
SKY HAWK — -Republic Industries 
SKYRIDER — Hallicrafters, Inc. 
SPARKS-WITHINGTON CO., E. Gan- 

son AV3., Jackson, Mich., "Sparton" 

— H 
SPARTON — Sparks-Withington Co. 
STEINBERG-CARLTON RADIO CO., 

413 Knickerbocker Ave., Brooklyn, 

N. Y., "Steinberg's Carlton" — H, RP 
STERLING — Ross Distributing Corp. 
STEWART-WARNER CORP., 1S26 Di- 

versey Parkway, Chicago, 111.. 

"Stewart-Warner" — A, H, F 
STROMBERG-CARLSON TELEPHONE 

MFG. CO., 100 Carlson Rd., Rochester, 

N. Y.— H, COM, RP 
STUYVESANT ELECTRIC CO., 140 

Washington St., New York City, 

"La Salle" — H, RP 
TATRO— See L'Tatro 
TELL-TIME — Case Electric Corp. 
TIFFANY TONE — Herbert H. Horn 
TOBE TUNE R — Tobe Deutchmann 

Corp. 
TOM THUMB — Automatic Radio Mfg. 

Co. 
TRANSFORMER CORP. OF AMERICA, 

100 Sixth Ave., New York City, 

"Clarion" — A, H, RP 
TRAVLER RADIO & TELEVISION 

CORP., 102S W. Van Buren St., 

Chicago, 111., "Trav-Ler" — H 

TROY RADIO MFG CO., 1142 S. Olive 
St., Los Angeles, Calif., "Troy" — A, 
AM, F, H, RP 

TRUDIAL — Mission Bell Radio Mfg. 
Co. 

TRY-MO RADIO CO., So Cortlandt St., 
New York City. "Paramount," "Pow- 
ertone" — AM, H 

TWINPLEX — Radio Trading Co. 

ULTRAMAR MFG. CORP., 1160 Chath- 
am Ct., Chicago, 111., "Ultramar" — A, 
H, RP 

UNITED AMERICAN BOSCH CORP., 
3664 Main St., Springfield, Mass., 
"American-Bosch" — A, F. H, RP 

UNITED MOTORS SERVICE. 3044 
Grand Blvd., Detroit, Mich., "Delco," 
"General Motors" — A, H 

VICTORY — Champion Radio Labora- 
tories 

WARWICK MFG. CO., 1700 W. Wash- 
ington Blvd., Chicago, 111., "War- 
wick" — A, F, H 

(To page 25) 



INDEX OF PRODUCTS LISTED 



Product Page 

Adapters, test 31 

Amplifiers 28 

Antennas and accessories 25 

Batteries 25 

Cathode-ray oscillographs 31 

Cathode-ray tubes : . . . 33 

Chokes, audio 32 

Coils, i-f., r-f 26 

Combination radio-phone 20 

Condensers, variable 26 

Condensers, fixed 26 

Condenser testers 31 

Converters, DC- AC 27 

Electronic tubes 32, 33 

Genemotors 27 

Line filters 27 

Meters 31 

Microphones 28 

Milliameters 31 

Multi-meters 31 

Oscillators 31 

Oscillographs, cathode-ray 31 

Phonographs, electric 29 

Pick-ups, phonograph 29 

Public address systems _. . . . 28 

Radio-phonograph combinations. 20 

Receivers, radio 20 



Product Page 

Record changers 29 

Records 29 

Recorders 29 

Record players 29 

Resistors 30 

Sets, radio 20 

Set analyzers 31 

Signal generators 31 

Speakers and parts 30 

Sound systems 28 

Switches, wave-changing 33 

Test equipment 31 

Transformers, audio, power .... 32 

Transmitters, commercial 32 

Tubes, receiving 32 

Tubes transmitting 33 

Tube testers 31 

Turnables 29 

Uni-meters 31 

Vacuum tube voltmeters 31 

Vibrators 33 

Vibrator testers 31 

Voltmeters 31 

Volume controls 30 

Wave-changing switches 33 

Windchargers 27 



December, 1935 



21 



XOLlkfoua 





IT'S THE TOP. The great RCA 
Victor D-22, with 22 tubes, five 
band radio, automatic phono- 
graph, with the magical Dynamic 
Amplifier,homeandradiorecord- 
ing. Record reproduction was 
never so thrilling as this. $600. 



I 



qwe'et*^ 



wIMb DAKKkL is the portion of the line 
over $100 and running up to the great, unrivaled 
D-22 at $600. It is the irresistible attractiveness 
of the finer models that has sent the RCA Victor 
average console sale this season to date well over 
last year's RCA Victor average of $102. 

THE OTHER BARREL is under $100, 

and here there is a lot of money to be made, too. 

Look at Packard! It has great acceptance as a 
quality product (so has RCA) and it brought out 
a new Packard in the $1000 class. What happened? 
Packard, since introducing it last March, has 
smashed all its own sales records into little bits. 
Why? Because the public transferred to the new 
car the glory of the great Packard name. They had 
always wanted to own a Packard, and here at last 
was a Packard they could afford to buy. Of course, 
they went for it in a big way. 

And then there's Lincoln. Last month it an- 
nounced its medium-priced Zephyr, and practically 
overnight received its most amazing flood of orders, 
from people who have "always wanted a Lincoln." 



RCA MANUFACTURING CO., INC., CAMDEN, N. J 




6te-6oMe6d '/the 



What has happened with Packard and Lincoln has 
also happened in the case of the famous Cadillac V-8. 
Exactly the same thing is occurring with RCA 
Victor. Sales figures demonstrate that the public 
chooses RCA Victor when buying quality radio. 
Now that RCA Victor is featuring sets under $100, 
the public is transferring to the low-priced line the 
prestige of the luxury models. They want RCA 
Victor sets. We give you models at prices that 
mean you can sell anybody a set with the RCA 
Victor magic name. You not only have the prices, 
but you have the powerful leverage of the C. I.T. 
partial payment plan. You can trade up from what 
the prospect thinks he can afford, or trade down 
from what you think he ought to buy, and in any 
case sell as fine a piece of new RCA Victor mer- 
chandise as is available at the price. So we say . . . 

FEATURE BOTH SIDES of*.*™ 

middle price. Get your share of the profits in the 
volume line as well as in the de luxe. It is this oppor- 
tunity to do double-barreled selling that makes the 
RCA Victor line mean much more money for you. 



jbsidiary of RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



llfc&l 





PRICE PLUS PERFORMANCE. Model C7-6 
has 7 RCA Metal Tubes, the Junior "Magic 
Brain," a 12 -inch speaker, reception 540 to 
18,000 kilocycles. A great popular model at 
.95. All prices f. o. b. Camden, subject to 
change without notice. 



%(%(^Had<Jfc-6<mefa{/tHe 




? 



IT'S THE TOP. The great RCA 
Victor D-22, with 22 tubes, five 
band radio, automatic phono- 
graph, with the magical Dynamic 
Amplifier, home and radio record- 
ing. Record reproduction was 
never so thrilling as this. $600. 






ONE BARREL is the portion of the line 
over $100 and running up to the great, unrivaled 
D-22 at $600. It is the irresistible attractiveness | 
of the finer models that has sent the RCA Victor 
average console sale this season to date well ovet 
last year's RCA Victor average of $102. 

THE OTHER BARREL i.und*im 

and here there is a lot of money to be made, too. 

Look at Packard! It has great acceptance as a 
quality product (so has RCA) and it brought out 
a new Packard in the $1000 class. What happened! 
Packard, since introducing it last March, has 
smashed all its own sales records into little bits. 
Why? Because the public transferred to the new 
car the glory of the great Packard name. They had 
always wanted to own a Packard, and here at last 
was a Packard they could afford to buy. Of course, 
they went for it in a big way. 

And then there's Lincoln. Last month it an- 
nounced its medium-priced Zephyr, and practica ) 
overnight received its most amazing flood of or e > 
from people who have "always wanted a Linco 



What has happened with Packard and Lincoln has 
also happened in the case of the famous Cadillac V-8. 
Exactly the same thing is occurring with RCA 
Victor. Sales figures demonstrate that the public 
chooses RCA Victor when buying quality radio. 
Now that RCA Victor is featuring sets under $100, 
the public is transferring to the low-priced line the 
prestige of the luxury models. They want RCA 
Victor sets. We give you models at prices that 
mean you can sell anybody a set with the RCA 
Victor magic name. You not only have the prices, 
but you have the powerful leverage of the C. I.T. 
partial payment plan. You can trade up from what 
the prospect thinks he can afford, or trade down 
from what you think he ought to buy, and in any 
case sell as fine a piece of new RCA Victor mer- 
chandise as is available at the price. So we say . . . 

FEATURE BOTH SIDES of the $100 

middle price. Get your share of the profits in the 
volume line as well as in the de luxe. It is this oppor- 
tunity to do double-barreled selling that makes the 
KLA Victor line mean much more money for you. 



RCA MANUFACTURING CO., INC., CAMDEN,N J * Su bsidiary of RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 



I 



% 



Cs 



5^ 



PRICE PLUS PERFORMANCE. Model C7-6 
has 7 RCA Metal Tubes, the Junior "Magic 
Brain," a 12 -inch speaker, reception 540 to 
18,000 kilocycles. A great popular model at 
$84.95. AH prices f. o. b. Camden, subject to 
change without notice. 




BROADCASTING STATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES 

(Revised to December, 1935, from official records of the Federal Communications Commission) 



Call 



Location 



KABC 

KABR 

KADA 

KALB 

KALE 

KARK 

KASA 

KAST 

KBPS 

KBTM 

KCMC 

KCRC 

KCRJ 

KDB 

KDFN 

KDKA 

KDLR 

KDON 

KDYL 

KEHA 

KEHE 

KELD 

KELW 

KERN 

KEX 

KFAB 

KFAC 

KFBB 

KFBI 

KFBK 

KFDM 

KFDY 

KFEL 

KFEQ 

KFGQ 

KFH 

KFI 

KFIO 

KFIZ 

KFJB 

KFJI 

KFJM 

KFJR 

KFJZ 

KFKA 

KFKU 

KFNF 

KFOR 

KFOX 

KFPL 

KFPM 

KFPW 

KFPY 

KFQD 

KFRC 

KFRO 

KFRU 

KFSD 

KFSG 

KFUO 

KFVD 

KFVS 

KFWB 

KFXD 

KFXJ 

KFXM 

KFXR 

KFYO 

KFYR 

KGA 

KGAR 

KGB 

KGBU 

KGBX 

KGBZ 

KGCA 

KGCU 

KGCX 

KGDE 

KGDM 

KGDY 

KGEK 

KGER 

KGEZ 

KGFF 

KGFG 

KGFI 

KGFJ 

KGFK 

KGFL 

KGFW 

KGFX 

KGGC 

KGGF 

KGGM 

KGHF 

KGHI 

KGHL 

KGIR 

KGIW 

KGKB 

KGKL 

KGKO 

KGKY 

KGMB 

KGNC 

KGNF 

KGNO 

KGO 

KGU 

KGVO 

KGW 

KGY 

KHBC 

KHJ 

KHQ 

KHSL 

K1CA 

KID 

KIDO 

K1DW 

KIEM 

KIEV 

KINY 

KIRO 

KIT 

KIUJ 



San Antonio.. Tex 1420 H 
Aberdeen ...S.D. 1420 H 

Ada Okla 1200 H 

Alexandria ...La 1420 H 

Portland Ore 1300 M 

Little Rock ..Ark 890 K 
Elk City ....Okl 1210 H 

Astoria Ore 1370 H 

Portland Ore 1420 H 

Paragould ...Ark 1200 H 
Texarkana ...Ark 1420 H 

Enid Okla 1370 K 

Jerome Arl 1310 H 

Santa Barb ..Cal 1500 H 

Casper Wyo 1440 M 

Pittsburgh Pa 980 W 

Devils Lake N.D, 1210 H 
Del Monte . ..Cal 1210 H 
Salt Lake City.U. 1290 O 
Los Angeles ..Cal 1430 
Los Angeles ..Cal 780 M 

Eldorado Ark 1370 H 

Burbank Cal 780 M 

Bakersfield ...Cal 1370 H 

Portland Ore I 180 S 

Lincoln Nebr 770 T 

Los Angeles ..Cal 1300 O 
Great Falls .Mont 1280 O 

Abilene Kan 1050 S 

Sacramento ...Cal 1310 H 

Beaumont Tex 560 M 

Brookings ...S.D. 780 O 

Denver Col 920 M 

St. Joseph Mo 680 R 

Boone Iowa 1370 H 

Wichita Kan 1300 

Los Angeles ...Cal 640W 
Spokane ...Wash 1120 H 
Fond du Lac. Wis 1420 H 
Marshalltown .la 1200 H 
Klamath Falls. Ore 1210 H 
Grand Forks. N.D. 1370 H 

Portland Ore 1300 M 

Fort Worth ..Tex 1370 H 

Greeley Col 880 M 

Lawrence Kan 1220 O 

Shenandoah la 890 M 

Lincoln Nebr 1210 H 

Long Beach ..Cal 1250 F 

Dublin Tex 1310 H 

Greenville ...Tex 1310 F 
Fort Smith ..Ark 1210 H 

Spokane Wash 890 

Anchorage .Alaska 780 K 
San Francisco .Cal 610 O 

Longview Tex 1370 H 

Columbia Mo 630 M 

San Diego Cal 600 

Los Angeles ..Cal 1120 M 

Clayton Mo 550 M 

Los Angeles ..Cal 1000 K 
Cane Glrardeau.Mo 1210 H 
Los Angeles ...Cal 950 

Nampa Idaho 1200 H 

Grand June ..Col 1200 H 
San Bernardino ..1210 H 
Okla. City ...Okl 1310 H 

Lubbock Tex 1310 H 

Bismarck N.D. 550 O 

Spokane Wash 1470 S 

Tucson Arl 1370 H 

San Diego ...Cal 1330 O 
Ketchikan .Alaska 900 M 
Springfield ...Mo 1310 H 

York Neb 930 O 

Decorah Iowa 1270 H 

Mandan N.D. 1240 K 

Wolf Point .Mont 1310 H 
Fergus Fall Minn 1200 H 

Stockton Cal 1100 K 

Huron S.D. 1340 K 

Sterling Col 1200 H 

Long Beach ..Cal 1360 
Kalisoell ...Mont 1310 H 

Shawnee Okl 1420 H 

Okla. City ...Okl 1370 H 
Corpus Christi Tex 1500 H 
Los Angeles ..Cal 1200 H 
Moorhead ...Minn 1500 H 

Roswell N.M. 1370 H 

Kearney Neb 1310 H 

Pierre S.D. 630 I 

San Francisco Cal 1420 H 
Coffevvllle ...Kan 1010 
Albuquerque N.M. 1230 K 

Pueblo Col 1320 M 

Little Rock ..Ark 1200 H 

Billings Mont 950 

Butte Mont 1340 n 

Alamosa Colo 1420 H 

Tyler Tex 1500 H 

San Angelo ..Tex 1370 H 
Wichita Falls .Tex 570 K 
Scottsbulff ...Neb 1500 H 
Honolulu .Hawaii 1320 K 

Amarillo Tex 1410 

N. Platte Neb 1430 

Dodge City ..Kan 1340 K 
San Francisco .Cal 790 S 
Honolulu . .Hawaii 750 R 
Missoula ...Mont 1200 H 

Portland Ore 620 

Olympla ...Wash 1210 H 

Hilo Hawaii 1420 H 

Los Angeles ...Cal 900 

Spokane Wash 590 K 

Chlco Cal 950 K 

Clovls N.M. 1370 H 

Idaho Falls Idaho 1320 K 

Boise Idaho 1350 O 

Lamar Col 1420 H 

Eureka Cal 1210 H 

Glendale Cal 850 H 

Juneau ...Alaska 1310 H 

Seattle Wash 650 K 

Yakima Wash 1310 H 

Sante Fe ...N.M 1310 H 

POWER 
CODE 



Location 



SS 



KIUL 

KIUN 

KIUP 

KJBS 

KJR 

KLCN 

KLO 

KLPM 

KLRA 

KLS 

KLUF 

KLX 

KLZ 

KMA 

KMAC 

KM BO 

KMED 

KMJ 

KM LB 

KMMJ 

KMO 

KMOX 

KM PC 

KMTR 

KNEL 

KNET 

KNOW 

KNX 

KOA 

KOAC 

KOB 

KOH 

KOIL 

KOIN 

KOL 

KOMA 

KOMO 

KONO 

KOOS 

KORE 

KOTN 

KOY 

KPAC 

KPJM 

KPLC 

KPO 

KPOF 

KPPC 

KPO 

KPRC 

KQV 

KQW 

KRE 

KREG 

KRGV 

KRKD 

KRKO 

KRLC 

KRLD 

KRLH 

KRMD 

KRNR 

KRNT 

KROC 

KROW 

KRSC 

KSAC 

KSCJ 

KSD 

KSEI 

KSFO 

KSL 

KSLM 

KSO 

KSOO 

KSTP 

KSUN 

KTAR 

KTAT 

KTBS 

KTFI 

KTHS 

KTRB 

KTRH 

KTSA 

KTSM 

KTUL 

KTW 

KUJ 

KUMA 

KUOA 

KUSD 

KVI 

KVL 

KVOA 

KVOD 

KVOL 

KVOO 

KVOR 

KVOS 

KVSO 

KWBG 

KWEA 

KWG 

KWJJ 

KWK 

KWKC 

KWKH 

KWLC 

KWSC 

KWTN 

KWTO 

KWYO 

KXA 

KXL 

KXO 

KXRO 

KXYZ 

KYA 

KYW 

WAAB 

WAAF 

WAAT 

WAAW 

WABC 

WABI 

WABY 

WACO 



Garden City .Kan 1210 H 

Pecos Tex 1420 H 

Durango Col 1370 H 

San Francisco ..C 1070 M 

Seattle Wash 970 S 

Blytheville ...Ark 1290 H 

Ogden Utah 1400 M 

Minot N.D. 1240 K 

Little Bock ..Ark 1390 

Oakland Cal 1440 K 

Galveston ...Tex 1370 H 

Oakland Cal 880 O 

Denver Col 560 

Shenandoah la 930 

San Antonio .Tex 1370 H 
Kansas City ...Mo 950 

Medford Ore 1310 H 

Fresno Cal 580 M 

Monroe La 1200 H 

Clay Center ...Neb740O 

Tacoma Wash 1330 K 

St. Louis Mo 1090 W 

Beverly Hills ..Cal 710 M 
Los Angeles ...Cal 570 O 

Brady Tex 1500 H 

Palestine Tex 1420 H 

Austin Tex 1500 H 

Los Angeles .Cal 1050 W 

Denver Col 830 W 

Corvallis Ore 550 

Albuquerque N.M. 1 180 T 

Beno Nev 1380 M 

Council Bluffs .la 1260 

Portland Ore 940 

Seattle Wash 1270 O 

Okla. City ...Okl 1480 S 

Seattle Wash 920 

San Antonio ..Tex 1370 H 
Marshfield . . .Ore 1200 K 

Eugene Ore 1420 H 

Pine Bluff ...Ark 1500 H 

Phoenix Ariz 1390 M 

Port Arthur .Tex 1260 M 

Prescott Ariz 1500 H 

Lake Charles ..La 1500 H 
San Francisco .Cal 680 W 

Denver Col 880 M 

Pasadena Cal 1210 F 

Wenatchee ..Wash 1500 H 

Houston Tex 920 

Pittsburgh Pa 1380 M 

San Jose Cal 1010 O 

Berkeley Cal 1370 H 

Santa Ana ...Cal 1500 H 

Weslaco Tex 1260 M 

Los Angeles ..Cal 1120 M 

Everett Wash 1370 F 

Lewiston ...Idaho 1420 H 

Dallas Tex 1040 T 

Midland Tex 1420 H 

Shrevenort La 1310 H 

Roseburg Ore 1500 H 

....la 1320 M 

.Minn 1310 H 

.Cal 930 



Des Moines 
Rochester . 
Oakland 



Seattle Wash 1120 H 

Manhattan Kan 580 M 

Sioux City la 1330 O 

St. Louis Mo 550 M 

Pocatello Ida 900 K 

San Francisco .Cal 560 O 
Salt Lake City. D 1 130 W 

Salem Ore 1370 H 

Des Moines ...la 1430 M 
Sioux Falls .S.D. 1 1 10 R 

St. Paul Minn 1460 T 

Lowell Ariz 1200 H 

Phoenix Ariz 620 

Ft. Worth ...Tex 1240 O 
Shreveport ....La 1450 
Twin Falls ...Ida 1240 M 
Hot Springs ..Ark 1040 T 

Modesto Cal 740 K 

Houston Tex 1290 

San Antonio . . .Tex 550 

El Paso Tex 1310 H 

Tulsa Okla 1400 M 

Seattle Wash 1220 

Walla Walla Wash 1370 H 

Yuma Ariz |420 H 

Fayettevllle ..Ark 1260 O 
Vermillion ...S.D. 890 M 

Tacoma Wash 570 

Seattle Wash 1370 H 

Tucson .' Ariz 1260 M 

Denver Col 920 M 

La'avette La 1310 H 

Tulsa Okla 1140 V 

Colo. Springs .Col 1270 O 
Bellingham .Wash 1200 H 

Ardmore Okla 1210 H 

Hutchinson .Kans 1420 H 

Shreveport La 1210 H 

Stockton Cal 1200 H 

Portland Ore 1060 M 

St. Louis Mo 1350 O 

Kansas City . .Mo 1370 H 

Shrevenort La 850 T 

Decorah la 1270 H 

Pullman Wash 1220 O 

Watertown ..S.D. 1210 H 



Soringfleld 
Sheridan . 
Seattle 



.Mo 560 O 
.Wyo 1370 H 
.Wash 760 K 

Portland Ore 1420 H 

EI Centro Cal 1500 H 

Aberdeen ...Wash 1310 H 

Houston Tex 1440 

San Francisco .Cal 1230 O 
Philadelphia ..Pa 1020 T 

Boston Mass 1410 M 

Chicago Ill 920 M 

Jersey City . . .N.J. 940 M 

Omaha Neb 660 M 

New York ...N.Y. 860 W 

Bangor Me 1200 H 

Albany N.Y. 1370 H 

Waco Tex 1420 H 



Location 



WADC 

WAGF 

WAGM 

WAIM 

WA1U 

WALA 

WALR 

WAML 

WAPI 

WARD 

WASH 

WATR 

WAVE 

WAWZ 

WAZL 

WBAA 

WBAL 

WBAP 

WBAX 

WBBC 

WBBL 

WBBM 

WBBR 

WBBZ 

WBCM 

WBEN 

WBEO 

WBHS 

WBIG 

WBNO 

WBNS 

WBNX 

WBNY 

WBOQ 

WBOW 

WBRB 

WBRC 

WBRE 

WBSO 

WBT 

WBTM 

WBZ 

WBZA 

WCAC 

WCAD 

WCAE 

WCAL 

WCAM 

WCAO 

WCAP 

WCAT 

WCAU 

WCAX 

WCAZ 

WCBA 

WCBD 

WCBM 

WCBS 

WCCO 

WCFL 

WCHS 

WCKY 

WCLO 

WCLS 

WCMI 

WCNW 

WCOA 

WCOC 

WCOL 

WCOP 

WCPO 

WCRW 

WCSC 

WCSH 

WDAE 

WDAF 

WDAH 

WDAS 

WDAY 

WDBJ 

WDBO 

WDEL 

WDEV 

WDGY 

WDNC 

WDOD 

WDRC 

WDSU 

WDZ 

WEAF 

WEAN 

WEBC 

WEBQ 

WEBR 

WEDC 

WEED 

WEEI 

WEEU 

WEHC 

WEHS 

WELI 

WELL 

WEMP 

WENR 

WESG 

WEST 

WEVD 

WEW 

WEXL 

WFAA 

WFAB 

WFAM 

WFAS 

WFBC 

WFBG 

WFBL 

WFBM 

WFBR 

WFDF 

WFEA 

WFIL 

WFLA 

WFMD 

WGAL 

WGAR 

WGBB 

WGBF 

WGBI 



Akron Ohio 1320 

Dothan Ala 1370 H 

Presque Isle .Me 1420 H 

Anderson S.C. 1200 H 

Columbus Ohio 640 M 

Mobile Ala 1380 M 

Zanesville ..Ohio 1210 H 

Laurel Miss 1310 H 

Birmingham ..Ala 1140 S 
Brooklyn ...N.Y. 1400 M 
Grand Rapids .M 1270 M 
Waterbury ..Conn 1190 H 

Louisville Ky 940 

Zarephalh ...N.J. 1350 M 

Hazleton Pa 1420 H 

West Lafayette Ind 890 M 
Baltimore (760) . 1060 T 
Fort Worth ...Tex 800 W 
Wilkes-Barre .Pa 1210 H 
Brooklyn ...N.Y. 1400 M 

Richmond Va 1210 H 

Chicago Ill 770 W 

Brooklyn N.Y'. 1300 O 

Ponca City ..Okla 1200 H 
.Mich 1410 M 
...N.Y. 900 O 
.Mich 1310 H 
...Ala 1200 H 
.N.C. 1440 M 
La 1200 H 



.Ohio 1430 M 
.N.Y. 1350 K 
.N.Y. 1370 H 
.N.Y. 860 W 
.Ind 1310 H 
.N.J. 1210 H 
.Ala 930 



Bay City 

Buffalo . . 

Marquette 

Huntsville 

Greensboro . 

New Orleans 

Columbus . . 

New York 

Buffalo . . 

New York 

Terre Haute 

Red Bank .. 

Birmingham 

Wilkes-Barre .Pa 1310 H 

Needham Mass 920 M 

Charlotte ...N.C. 1080 W 

Danville Va 1370 H 

Springfield ..Mass 990 W 

Boston Mass 990 

Storrs Conn 600 M 

Canton N.Y. 1220 M 

Pittsburgh Pa 1220 

Northfield ..Minn 1250 

Camden N.J. 1280 M 

Baltimore Md 600 M 

Asbury Park. N.J. 1280 M 
Rapid City ..S.D. 1200 H 
Philadelphia ..Pa 1170 W 

Burlington Vt 1200 H 

Carthage Ill 1070 H 

Allentown Pa 1440 M 

Waukegan Ill 1080 S 

Baltimore Md 1370 H 

Springfield 111 1420 H 

Minneapolis .Minn 810 W 

Chicago Ill 970 S 

Charleston . .W.V. 580 M 

Covington Ky 1490 S 

.Tanesville Wis 1200 H 

Joliet Ill 1310 H 

Ashland Ky 1310 H 

Brooklyn ...N.Y. 1500 H 

Pensacola Fla 1340 M 

Meridian Miss 880 M 

Columbus ...Ohio 1210 H 

Boston Mass 1120 M 

Cincinnati ..Ohio 1200 H 

Chicago Ill 1210 H 

Charleston ...S.C. 1360 M 

Portland Me 940 O 

Tampa Fla 1220 

Kansas City ...Mo 610 O 

El Paso Tex 1310 H 

Philadelphia ..Pa 1370 H 

Fargo ... N.D. 940 O 

Roanoke Va 930 O 

Orlando Fla 580 K 

Wilmington ..Del 1120 K 

Waterbury Vt 550 M 

Minneapolis .Minn 1 180 O 

Durham N.C. 1500 H 

Chattanooga -Tenn 1280 O 

Hartford Conn 1330 

New Orleans ..La 1250 

Tuscola Ill 1070 H 

New York ...N.Y. 660 W 
Providence ...R.I. 780 M 

Superior Wis 1290 

Harrtsburg 111 1210 H 

Buffalo N.Y. 1310 H 

Chicago Ill 1210 H 

Rocky Mt. ..N.C. 1420 H 

Boston Mass 590 

Reading Pa 830 

Charlotteville .Va 1420 H 

Chicago Ill 1420 H 

New Haven ..Conn 900 M 
Battle Ck ..Mich 1420 H 
Milwaukee ...Wis 1310 H 

Chicago Ill 870 W 

Elmlra N.Y. 1040 

Lancaster Pa 1200 H 

New York ...N.Y 1300 O 

St. Louis Mo 760 O 

Boyal Oak ..Mich 1310 F 

Dallas Tex 800 W 

New York . . .N.Y. 1300 
South Bend ..Ind 1200 H 
White Plains N.Y 1210 H 
Greenville ...S.C. 1300 

Altoona Pa 1310 H 

Syracuse N.Y. 1360 

Indianapolis ..Ind 1230 O 

Baltimore Md 1270 M 

Flint Mich 1310 H 

Manchester .N.H. 1340 M 
Philadelphia ...Pa 560 M 

Clearwater Fla 620 O 

Frederick Md 900 M 

Lancaster Pa 1500 H 

Cleveland O 1450 M 

Freeport N.Y. 1210 H 

Evansville Ind 630 M 

Scranton . .Pa 880 M 



Location 



WGCM 

WGES 

WGH 

WGL 

WGN 

WGNY 

WGPC 

WGR 

WGST 

WGY 

WHA 

WHAM 

WHAS 

WHAT 

WHAZ 

WHB 

WHBB 

WHBC 

WHBF 

WHBI 

WHBL 

WHBQ 

WHBU 

WHBY 

WHDF 

WHDH 

WHDL 

WHEC 

WHEB 

WHEF 

WHFC 

WHIO 

WHIS 

WHJB 

WHK 

WHN 

WHO 

WHOM 

WHP 

WIBA 

WIBG 

WIBM 

WIBU 

WIBW 

WIBX 

WICC 

WIL 

WILL 

WILM 

WIND 

WINS 

WIOD 

WIP 

WIRE 

WIS 

WISN 

WJAC 

WJAG 

WJAR 

WJAS 

WJAX 

WJAY 

WJBC 

WJBK 

WJBL 

WjBO 

WJBR 

WIBW 

WJBY 

WJDX 

WJEJ 

WJIM 

WJJD 

WJMS 

WJR 

WJSV 

WJTL 

WJW 

WJZ 

WKAQ 

WKAR 

WKBB 

WKBH 

WKBI 

WKBN 

WKBO 

WKBV 

WKBW 

WKBZ 

WKEU 

WKOK 

WKRC 

WKY 

WKZO 

WLAC 

WLAP 

WLB 

WLBC 

WLBF 

WLBL 

WLBZ 

WLEU 

WLLH 

WLNH 

WLS 

WLTH 

WLVA 

WLW 

WLWL 

WMAL 

WMAQ 

WMAS 

WMAZ 

WMBC 

WMBD 

WMBG 

WMBH 

WMBI 

WMBO 

WMBQ 

WMBR 

WMC 

WMCA 

WMEX 

WMFD 

WMFF 

WMFG 

WMFJ 



Gulfport Miss 1210 H 

Chicago 111. 1360 M 

Newport News Va 1310 H 
Ft. Wayne . . .Ind 1370 H 

Chicago Ill 720 W 

ChesterTwp .N.Y. 1210 H 

Albany Ga 1420 H 

Buffalo N.Y. 550 O 

Atlanta Ga 890 M 

Schenectady ..N.Y. 790 W 

Madison Wis 940 R 

Rochester ..N.Y. 1150 W 

Louisville Ky820W 

Philadelphia ..Pa 1310 H 

Troy N.Y. 1300 M 

Kansas City ...Mo 860 O 

Selma Ala 1500 H 

Canton Ohio 1200 H 

Rock Island ..111 1210 H 

Newark N.J. 1250 

Sheboygan ...Wis 1410 M 
Memphis ...Tenn 1370 H 

Anderson Ind 1210 H 

Green Bay ...Wis 1200 H 

Calumet Mich 1370 H 

Boston Mass 830 O 

Olean N.Y. 1420 H 

Rochester ...N.Y. 1430 M 
Portsmouth ..N.H. 740 K 
Kosciusko ...Miss 1500 H 

Cicero Ill 1420 H 

Dayton O 1260 

Bluefield ...W.V. 1410 K 

Greensburg Pa 620 K 

Cleveland Ohio 1390 



New York 
Des Moines 
Jersey City 
Harrisburg 



.N.Y. 1010 O 

...la 1000 W 

.N.J. 1450 K 

.Pa 1430 M 



Madison Wis 1 280 

Glenside Pa 970 H 

Jackson Mich 1370 H 

Poynette Wis 1210 H 

Topeka Kan 580 

TJtica N.Y. 1200 H 

Bridgeport . .Conn. 600 M 

St. Louis Mo 1200 H 

Urbana Ill 890 K 

Wilmington ..Del 1420 H 

Gary Ind 580 O 

New York ...N.Y. 1180 O 

Miami Fla 1300 O 

Philadelphia ...Pa 610 M 
Indianapolis -Ind. 1400 M 

Columbia S.C. 1010 M 

Milwaukee ...Wis 1120 K 

Johnstown Pa 1310 H 

Norfolk Neb 1060 O 

Providence ...R.I. 890 K 

Pittsburgh Pa 1290 O 

Jacksonville . . .Fla 900 

Cleveland Ohio 610 M 

Bloomlngton ..111 1200 H 

Detroit Mich 1500 H 

Decatur Ill 1200 H 

Baton Rouge ..La 1420 H 

Gastonia N.C. 1420 H 

New Orleans ..La 1200 H 

Gadsden Ala 1210 H 

Jackson Miss 1270 O 

Hagerstown ...Md 1210 H 

Lansing Mich 1210 H 

Chicago HI 1130 U 

Ironwood ...Mich 1420 H 

Detroit Mich 750 W 

Alexandria Va 1460 T 

Atlanta Ga 1370 H 

Akron Ohio 1210 H 

New York ...N.Y. 760 W 
San Juan ...P.R. 1240 
E. Lansing .Mich 1040 
E. Dubuque ...111 1500 H 

LaCrosse Wis 1380 O 

Chicago HI 1420 H 

Youngstown O 570 M 

Harrisburg ...Pa 1200 H 

Richmond Ind 1500 H 

Buffalo N.Y. 1480 S 

Muskegon ...Mich 1500 H 

Griffin Ga 1500 H 

Sunbury Pa 1210 H 

Cincinnati ...Ohio 550 M 

Okla. City Okl 900 

Kalamazoo . . .Mich 590 O 



Nashville 
Lexington 
Minneapolis 



.Tenn 1470 s 
,.Kv 1420 H 
Min 1250 O 



Muncle Ind 1310 W 

Kan. City ...Kan 1420 H 

Stevens Pt Wis 900 R 

Bangor Me 620 M 

Erie Pa M20 H 

Lowell Mass 1370 H 

Laconia N.H. 1310 H 

Chicago Ill 870 W 

Brooklyn ...N.Y. 1400 M 

Lynchburg Va 1200 H 

Cincinnati . . .Ohio 700 X 
New York ...N.Y. 1100 S 
Washington ..D.C. 630 K 

Chicago 111670 W 

Springfield .Mass 1420 H 

Macon Ga 1180 O 

Detroit Mich 1420 H 

Peoria Til 1440 M 

Richmond Va 1210 H 

.Toplin Mo 1420 H 

Chicago Ill 1080 S 

Auburn N.Y. 1310 H 

Brooklyn N.Y. 1500 H 

Jacksonville ..Fla 1370 H 

Memphis Tenn 780 

New York ...N.Y. 570 M 

Chelsea Mass 1500 H 

Wilmington .N.C. 1370 H 
Plattsburg ..N.Y. 1310 H 

Hibblng Minn 1210 H 

Daytona Bch .Fla 1420 H 



Call 



Location 



SSlS 



WMFN Clarksdale ..Miss 1210 H 

WMFO Decatur Ala 1370 H 

WMFR High Point .N.C. 1200 H 
WMMN Fairmont ...W.Va890 K 

WMPC Lapeer Mich 1200 H 

WMT Cedar Rapids ...la 600 M 

WN AC Boston Mass 1230 O 

WNAD Norman Okl 1010 O 

WNAX Yankton S.D. 570 

WNBC New Britain Conn 1380 K 
WNBF Binghamton .N.Y. 1500 H 
WNBH New Bedford Mass 1310 K 
WNBR Memphis ...Tenn 1430 M 
WNBX Springfield ....Vtl260O 
WNBZ SaranacLake N.Y. 1290 F 
WNEL San Juan ...P.R. 1290 M 

W NEW Newark N.J. 1250 

WNOX Knoxville ...Tenn 1010 Q 
WNRA Muscle Sh'ls .Ala 1420 H 

WNRI Newport R.I. 1200 H 

WNYC New York ...N.Y. 810 O 
WOA1 San Antonio .Tex 1 190 W 

WOC Davenport la 1370 H 

WOOL Jamestown ...N.Y. 1210 F 

WOI Ames la 640 S 

WOKO Albany N.Y. 1430 M 

WOL Washington .D.C. 1310 H 
WOMT Manitowoc ...Wisl2|0H 
WOOD Gd Rods ...Mich 1270 M 

WOPI Bristol Tenn 1500 H 

WOR Newark N.J. 710 W 

WORC Worcester . . Mass 1 280 M 

WORK York Pa 1320 

WOS Jefferson City .Mo630M 

WOSU Columbus Ohio 570 N 

WOV New York ...N.Y. 1130 O 

WOW Omaha Neb 590 

WOWO Ft. Wayne ...Ind 1160 T 

WPAD Paducah Ky 1420 H 

WPAR Parkersburg W.Va 1420 H 
WPAX Thomasville ...Gal2IOH 
WPAY Portsmouth ..Ohio 1370 H 
WPEN Philadelphia ...Pa920K 
WPFB Hattlesbure .Miss 1370 H 
WPG Atlantic City .N.J. MOOS 

W P H R Petersburg Va 880 M 

WPRO Piovidence ...R.I. 630 K 

WPRP Ponce P.R. 1420 H 

WPTF Raleigh N.C. 680 S 

WQAM Miami Fla 560 O 

WOAN Scranton Pa 880 K 

WQBC Vicksbure ...Miss 1360 

WQDM St. Albans Vt 1370 H 

WRAK Williamsport ..Pa 1370 H 

WRAW Reading Pa 1310 H 

WRAX Philadelphia ...Pa 920 K 

WRBL Columbus Ga 1200 H 

WRC Washington ..D.C. 950 M 

WRDO Augusta Me 1370 H 

WRDW Augusta Ga 1500 H 

WREC Memphis Tenn 600 M 

WREN Lawrence Kan 1220 O 

WRGA Rome Ga 1500 H 

WRJN Racine Wis 1370 H 

WROK Rockford Ill 1410 M 

WROL Knoxville ...Tenn 1310 H 

WRR Dallas Tex 1280 M 

WRUF Gainesville Fla 830 S 

WRVA Richmond ValMOS 

WSAI Cincinnati ...Ohio 1330 

WSAJ Grove City Pa 1310 H 

WSAN Allentown Pa 1440 M 

WSAR Fall River ..Mass 1450 K 
WSAY Rochester ...N.Y. 1210 H 
WSAZ Huntington .W.Va 1 190 

WSB Atlanta Ga 740 W 

WSBC Chicago Hi 1210 H 

WSBT South Bend ..Ind 1360 M 
WSFA Montgomery ..Ala 1410 M 
WSGN Birmingham ..Ala 1310 H 
WSIX Springfield ..Tenn 1210 H 
WSJS Winston-Salem NC 1310 H 

WSM Nashville Tenn 650 W 

WSMB New Orleans ..La 1320 

WSM K Dayton Ohio 1380 J 

WSOC Charlotte ...N.C. 1210 H 
WSPA Spartanburg ..S.C. 920 O 

WSPD Toledo Ohio 1340 O 

WSUI Iowa City la 880 M 

WSVA Harrisonburg ..Va550M 

WSVS Buffalo N.Y. 1370 F 

WSYB Rutland Vt 1500 H 

WSYR Syracuse N.Y. 570 K 

WSYU Syracuse N.Y. 570 K 

WTAD Qulncy Ill 900 M 

WTAG Worcester . . .Mass 580 M 

WTAL Tallahassee ...Fla 1310 H 

WTAM Cleveland 

WTAQ Eau Claire 

WTA R Norfolk . . . 

WTAW College Sta 

WTAX Springfield 

WTBO Cumberland 

WTCN Minneapolis 

WTEL Philadelphia 



.Ohio 1070 W 
...Wis 1330 
. . .Va 780 M 
.Tex 1120 M 
. . .11112(0 H 
...Md 800 K 
.Min 1250 O 
..Pa 1310 H 

WTFI Athens Ga 1450 M 

WTIC Hartford ...Conn 1060 W 

WTJS Jackson Tenn 1310 H 

WTMJ Milwaukee Wis 620 

WTMV E. St. Louis.. Mo 1500 H 

WTNJ Trenton N.J. 1280 M 

WTOC Savannah Ga 1260 O 

WTRC Elkhart Ind 1310 F 

WVFW Brooklyn ...N.Y. 1400 M 
WWAE Hammond ... .Ind 1200 H 

WWJ Detroit Mich 920 O 

WWL New Orleans ...La 850 T 
WWNC Asheville ....N.C. 570 O 
WWRL Woodside ...N.Y. 1500 H 
WWSW Pittsburgh ... .Pa 1500 H 
WWVA Wheelng ...W.Va 1160 S 

WX YZ Detroit Mich 1 240 

High Fidelity (20 kc.) 
WIXBS Waterbury ..Conn 1530 O 
W2XR New York ..N.Y. 1550 O 
W6X A I Bakersfield ...Cal 1550 O 
W9XBYKansas City ..Mo 1530 



50 



75 100 150 200 250 H00 
G H I J K L 



500 750 1000 



24 



Radio Today 



(From page 21) 

WATTEESON RADIO MFG. CO., 507 S. 

Akard St., Dallas, Tex., "Watterson" 
WELLS-GARDNER & CO., 2701 N. Kil- 

dare Ave., Chicago, 111., "Arcadia," 

"Wells-Gardner" — A, F, H 
WESTERN ELECTRIC CO., 195 Broad- 
way, New York City, "Western Elec- 
tric" — COM 
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC SUPPLY 

CO., 150 Varick St., New York City, 

"Westinghouse" — A, P, H 
WILCO RADIO CO., 1472 Broadway, 

New York City, "Wilco" — A, AM, 

COM, H, RP 
WILCOX-GAY CORP., Charlotte, Mich., 

"Wilcox-Gay" — A, P. H 
WORLD RADIO, 1072 Atlantic Ave., 

Brooklyn, N. Y., "World Radio" — A, H 
YORKER — Espey Mfg. Co. 
ZENITH RADIO CORP., 3620 Iron St., 

Chicago, 111., "Zenith Long Distance 

Radio" — A, F, H, RP 

ANTENNAS & ACCESSORIES 

Auto antennas — AA 
Home antennas — HA 
Accessories — ACC 

AIR QUEEN — Knox Porcelain Corp. 
BELDEN MFG. CO., 4647 W. Van Buren 

St., Chicago, 111., "Belden" — ACC, HA 
BIRNBACK RADIO CO., 145 Hudson 

St., New York City, "Birnback" — 

ACC, HA 

L. S. BRACH & CO., 80 Duryea St., 

Newark N. J., "Brach" — ACC 
BROWNIE — Porcelain Products, Inc. 

BUD RADIO, INC., 1937 E. 55th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio, "Bud" — ACC 

BURCH PRESTEEL PRODUCTS, Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn. — ACC 



CONSOLIDATED WIRE & ASSOCI- 
ATED CORPS., Peoria St., Chicago, 
111., "Consolidated," "Sta-Put" — AA, 
ACC, HA 

CONTINENTAL WIRE CO., 110 Lafa- 
yette St., New York City, "Continen- 
tal" — ACC, HA 

CORNISH WIRE CO., INC., 30 Church 
St., New York City, "Corwico Noise 
Master" — ACC, HA 

CORWICO NOISE MASTER — Cornish 
Wire Co., Inc. 

TOBE DEUTSCHMANN CORP., Canton, 
Mass., "Tobe" — HA 

DU-WA — Palmer Electric Mfg. Co. 

EPFARSEE — Fishwick Radio Co. 

FISHWICK RADIO CO., 407 E. 8th St., 
Cincinnati, Ohio, "Effarsee" — AA, HA 

F & H RADIO LABORATORIES, Fargo, 
N. Dak., "F & H"— HA 

M. M. PLERON & SONS, 113 N. Broad 
St.. Trenton, N. X, "Fleron" — AA, 
ACC, HA 

GENERAL CABLE CORP., 420 Lex- 
ington Ave., New York City — ACC 

ICA — Insuline Corp. of America 

INSULINE CORP. OF AMERICA, 25 

Park PL, New York City, "ICA" — 

AA, ACC, HA 
E. F. JOHNSON CO., Waseca, Minn. 

—ACC 
KNOX PORCELAIN CORP., Knoxville, 

Tenn., "Air Queen" — ACC, HA 
ARTHUR H. LYNCH 1 , INC., 227 Fulton 

St., New York City, "Lynch" — ACC, 

HA 
McMURDO SILVER CORP., 3354 N. 

Paulina St., Chicago, 111., "Silver" 

—HA 
PALMER ELECTRIC & MFG. CO., 23 

S. St. Clair St., Toledo, Ohio, "Du-Wa" 

— HA 

PHILMORE MFG. CO., 113 University 
PL, New York City, "Philmore"— 
ACC, HA 



PORCELAIN PRODUCTS, INC., 124 W. 

Front St., Findlay, Ohio, "Brownie" 

—ACC, HA 
PREMAX SALES DIV., Chisholm-Ryder 

Co., Niagara Falls, N. Y., "Premax" — 

ACC 
STA-PUT — Consolidated Wire & Asso 

Corps. 

TACO — Technical Appliance Corp. 

TECHNICAL APPLIANCE CORP., 17 E. 
16th St., New York City, "Taco" — HA 

TOBE — Tobe Deutschmann Corp. 

QUAM-NICHOLS CO., 1615 W. 74th St., 
Chicago, 111.. "Quam" — HA 

ULTRAMAR MFG. CORP., 1160 
Chatham Ct., Chicago, 111., "Ultra- 
mar" — HA 

WARD PRODUCTS CORP., 2135 Supe- 
rior Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, "Ward" — 
ACC, HA 



BATTERIES, "B" & "C" 

BOND ELECTRIC CO., Jersey City, N. J., 

"Bond" 
BRIGHT STAR BATTERY CO., Clifton, 

N. J., "Bright Star" 
BURGESS BATTERY CO., Freeport, 111., 

"Burgess" 
EVEREADY — National Carbon Co. 
GENERAL DRY BATTERY CO., Cleve- 
land, Ohio 
MARATHON BATTERY CO., Wausau, 

Wis., "Marathon" 
NATIONAL CARBON CO., 30 E. 42nd 

St., New York City, "Eveready," also 

air cell 
RAY-O-VAC CO., Madison, Wis., "Ray- 

o-vac" 
WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS 

CO., Bridgeport, Conn. 




Utilizing all the advantages of 
manufacturing technique developed 
in the past 28 years, Arcturus has 
perfected and improved ' ' the greatest 
advance in radio tube design in 28 
years." The radio industry, aware of 
the inherent weaknesses of metal 
tubes, had looked forward to an im- 
provement by 1936. 

Now, a full business year ahead of 
the industry, Arcturus introduces the 



coronet Metal Tube — the perfected de- 
velopment of the metal tube, coronet 
Metal Tubes at once advance the metal 
tube development from an experi- 
mental stage to a dependable design 
using all the tried and proved advan- 
tages of the vacuum tube art. Get the 
details of this remarkable new improve- 
ment today. 

Arcturus Radio Tube Company, 
Newark, New Jersey. 



ARCTOmiUS 



RADIO 
TUBES 



SALIENT FEATURES OF ARCTURUS 
CORONET METAL TUBES ARE: 

1 . Loiver capacities than either other metal or glass 
tubes. 

2. More dependable vacuum than the original metal 
tube. 

3. Less prone to gas than the original tnetal tube. 

4. Lower operating temperatures permit closer ar- 
rangement of chassis components. 

5. Eliminate possibility of dead shorts to ground. 

6. Diameter identical to other metal tubes. 

7 . Height yi. inch greater, facilitating insertion and 
removal. 

8. Rugged structure; better appearance; longer life. 

9 . Quiet operation, as it has no metallic sleighbells . 
10. Self shielding. 

CORONET Metal 

Tubes incorporate 28 

years of manufactur- 

ingtech- 

niaue. 




December, 1935 



25 



CASE 

7^ei;er Such TOJ^E 
Over the Air! 

Tell -Time Tuning 
REVOLUTIONIZES 

Short Wave Reception!! 




MODEL, 1015 

10 Tubes, 9 metal; 4 scales, 12 

dynamic speaker. 



Two table models, $47.50 and $00; 
tour consoles, $79.50 to $149.50. 



TELL-TIME TUNING SYSTEM 

All models are equipped with full 
vision Tell-Time Tuning- system 
which uses 360 degrees instead of 
the usual 180 degrees. This new 
system provides an easy reading and 
easy tuning dial. 

EIGHT-ISCH JUMBO DIAL, 

Case is the originator of the Jumbo 
dial, following- the trend of up-to- 
date automobile instrument design. 
Easier to see. Simplifies the separa- 
tion of crowded wave bands. 

"PHANTOM" LATERAL, 
ILLUMINATION 

By an ingenious lighting arrange- 
ment the dial presents a depth and 
richness not found in any other set. 



Jobber territories now being allotted. 
WRITE OR WIRE 

CASE ELECTRIC 
CORPORATION 

1307 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVENUE, 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

Export Oft.: 330 So. Wells St., Chicago 
Cable address: CaseLect, Chicago. 



WHO'S WHO AND WHERE TO BUY 



COILS 

Intermediate — IF 
Radio frequency — RF 

ALADDIN RADIO INDUSTRIES, 466 W. 
Superior St., Chicago, 111., "Aladdin" — 
IF.RF 

ALDEN PRODUCTS CO., 715 Center St., 
Brockton, Mass., "Na-Ald" — RF 

AUTOMATIC WINDING CO., 96 Devon 
St., Newark, N. J. — IF, RF 

BOND RAB-IO CO.. 11702 Livernois St., 
Detroit, Mich., "Bonrad" — IF, RF 

BONRAD — Bond Radio Co. 

BUD RADIO, INC., 1937 E. 55 St., Cleve- 
land, Ohio, "Bud" — IF, RF 

CARRON MFG. CO., 415 S. Aberdeen St., 
Chicago, 111., "Carron"— IF.RF 

FEDERAL ENGINEERING CORP., 2S6 
Mercer St., New York City— IF 

FERROCART CORP., OF AMERICA, 30 
Rockefeller Center, New York City, 
' 'Ferrocart' ' — IF 

FREED TRANSFORMER CO., 100 6th 
Ave., New York City, "Freed" — IF 

EDWIN I. GUTHMAN & CO., INC.. 1-36 
W. Van Buren St., Chicago, 111., "Guth- 
man" — IF.RF 

HAMMARDUND MFG. CO., 424 W. 33rd 

St., New York City, "Hammarlund" — 

IF, RF 
INSULINE CORP. OF AMERICA, 25 

Park Place, New York City, "ICA"— 

RF 
MEISSNER MFG. CO., 2S15 W. 19th St., 

Chicago, 111., "Meisnrcoil" — IF, RF 

MEISNRCOIL— Meisner Mfg. Co. 

J. W. MILLER CO., 5917 S. Main St., Los 
Angeles, Calif., "Miller" — IF, RF 

NATIONAL CO., 61 Sherman St., Maiden, 
Mass., "National" — IF, RF 

NA-ALD — Alden Products Co. 
J. & D. SARA CO., 123 Liberty St., New 
York City, "Sara" — IF, RF 

THE F. W. SICKLES CO., 300 Main St., 
Springfield, Mass., "Sickles" — IF, RF 

TELRADIO ENGINEERING CORP., 4S4 
Broome St., New York City. 

ULTRAMAR MFG. CORP., 1160 Chatham 
Court, Chicago, 111., "Ultramar" 

WESTERN RADIO PRODUCTS CO., 
3044 W. Main St., Alhambra, Calif., 
"Air-Wound" — RF 

CONDENSERS, FIXED 

Electrolytic — E 
Mica — M 
Paper— P 

ACRACON — C ondenser Corp. of 

America 
AEROVOX CORP.. 70 Washington St., 

Brooklyn, N. Y., "Aerovox," "Hi- 
Farad" — E. M. P — See adv. p. 40 
ARISTON LABORATORY, Ariston Mfg. 

Corp., 4045 Diversey Ave., Chicago, 

111. — E, P 
BOND ELECTRIC CORP., 257 Corneli- 

son Ave., Jersev City, N. J., "Bond" — 

E, P 
BOND RADIO CO., 11702 Livernois Ave., 

Detroit, Mich., "Bonrad" — E, P 
BONRAD — Bond Radio Co. 
C-D — Cornell-Dubilier Corp. 
CONCOURSE COND. CO., 3S7 Wales 

Ave., New York City, "Concourse" — 

E, P 
CONDENSER CORP. OF AMERICA. 

259 Cornelison Ave., Jersey City, N. J., 

"Acracon" — E, P 
CONSOLIDATED RADIO PRODUCTS 

CO., 363 W. Superior St., Chicago, III. 
. . — P 
CONTINENTAL CARBON, INC., 

Lorain Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, 

tinental" — E, P 
CORNELL - DUBILIER CORP., 

Bronx Blvd., New Y'ork City, 

"Cornell-Dubilier" — E, M, P — See adv. 

p. 39 



13900 
"Con- 



4375 
"C-D,' 



COSMIC RADIO CORP.. 699 E. 135th St., 
New York City, "Cosmic" — E, P 

CURTIS CONDENSER CORP., 3088 W. 
106th St., Cleveland, Ohio, "Curtis 
Blue Ribbon" — F — See adv. p. 41 

TOBE DEUTSCHMANN CORP., Canton, 
Mass.. "Tobe" — E. P 

DUCO — Dumont Electric Co.. Inc. 

DUMONT ELECTRIC CO., INC., 514 
Broadway, New York City, "Duco" — 
E, M, P 

DURA VOLT— Solar Mfg. Corp. 

ECONOMY — Polymet Mfg. Corp. 

ELECTRO MOTIVE MFG. CO., INC, 
707 E. 140th St.. New York City, "El 
Meneo" — M 

ELECTRONIC LABORATORIES, INC., 
122 E. New York Ave., Indianapolis, 
Ind. — P 

EL MENCO — Electro Motive Mfg. Co. 

FEDERAL ENGINEERING CORP. 286 
Mercer St., New York City — P 

A. M. FLECHTHEIM & CO., INC., 136 

Liberty St., New York City, "Flech- 
theim" — P 

FREED TRANSFORMER CO., 100 6th 

Ave., New York City, "Freed" — P 
GENERAL RADIO CO., 30 State St., 

Cambridge, Mass., "G-R" — A — Special 

purpose 
G-H — Girard-Hopkins 
GIRARD CONTINENTAL CONDENSER 

CORP., 2341 Wolfram St., Chicago, 

111., "Super Seal"- — P 
G-R — General Radio Co. 
HI-FARAD — Aerovox Corp. 
GIRARD HOPKINS, 1437 23rd Ave , 

Oakland, Calif., "G-H" — E, P 
ICA — Insuline Corp. of America 
INSULINE CORP. OF AMERICA, 25 

Park Place, New York City, "ICA" 

ILLINI — Sangamo Electric Co. 

LEICHNER ELECTRIC CO., 2026 Fair- 
field Ave., Fort Wayne, Ind., "Leich- 
ner Capacitors" — M-Glass 

LITTLE GIANT— Solar Mfg. Co. 

MAGNAVOX CO., 21231 Bueter Road 
Fort Wayne, Ind., "Magnavox" — E 

P. R. MALLORY & CO., INC., 3029 E. 
Washington St., Indianapolis, Ind., 
"Mallory" — E 

MICAMOLD RADIO CORP., 1087 Flush- 
ing Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y., "Micamold" 
— E, M. P 

PHILMORE MFG. CO., 113 University 
Place, New York City, "Philmore"— 
E, M, P 

POLYMET MFG. CORP., 829 E. 134th 

St., New York City, "Economy," 

"Polymet" — E, M, P 
SANGAMO ELECTRIC CO., Springfield, 

111., 'Illini," "Sangamo" — M 
SEALDTITE— Solar Mfg. Corp. 
SEVISON MAGNETO ENGINEERING 

CO., 379-401 Phillips Ave., Toledo, 

Ohio — P 

SOLAR MPG. CORP., 599-601 Broadway, 
New York City, "Duravolt," "Littie 
Giant," "Sealdtite," "Star Midget" — 
E, M, P — See adv. p. 38 

SPRACO — Sprague Products Co. 
SPRAGUE PRODUCTS CO., North 

Adams, Mass., "Spraco," "Sprague 
600' Line" — E, P 
STAR MIDGET— Solar Mfg. Co. 
SUPER SEAL— Girard Continental 

Condenser Corp. 
TOBE — Tobe Deutschmann Corp. 

CONDENSERS, VARIABLE 

Tuning— TU 

Trimming or equalizing — EQ 

ALADDIN RADIO INDUSTRIES, 466 W. 
Superior St., Chicago, 111., "Aladdin"— 
EQ 

AMERICAN STEEL PACKAGE CO., 
Squire Ave., Defiance, Ohio, "Defiance" 
— TU 

BOND RADIO CO., 11702 Livernois Ave., 
Detroit, Mich., "Bonrad" — TU 



26 



Radio Today 



BONRAD — Bond Radio Co. 

BUD RADIO, INC., 1937 B. 55 St., Cleve- 
land, Ohio, "Bud"— TU 

DE ADCO PRODUCTS, 9 W. Illinois St., 
Chicago, 111. 

DEFIANCE — American Steel Package Co. 

ALLEN D. CARDWELL MFG. CO., 81 
Prospect St., Brooklyn, N. Y., "Card- 
well"— TU 

DE JUR-AMSCO CORP., 90 Morton St., 
New York City, "De Jur-Amsco" — 
EQ, TU 

GENERAL INSTRUMENT CORP., S29 
Newark Ave., Elizabeth, N. J., "G-I"— 
TU 

GENERAL RADIO CO., 30 State St., 
Cambridge, Mass., "G-R" — Special pur- 
pose 

G-I — General Instrument Corp. 

G-R— General Radio Co. 

HAMMARLUND MFG. CO., 424 W. 33 
St., New York City, "Hammarlund" — 
EQ, TU 

ICA — Insuline Corp. of America 

INSULINE CORP. OF AMERICA, 25 
Park Place, New York City, "ICA" — 
TU 

E. F. JOHNSON CO., Waseca, Minn., TU 

MEISSNER MFG. CO., 2815 W. 19 St., 
Chicago, 111., "Meissner" — EQ 

MICAMOLD RADIO CORP., 1087 Flush- 
ing Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y., "Micamold" 
— EQ 

J. W. MILLER CO., 5917 S. Main St., Los 
Angeles, Calif., "Miller" — EQ 

NATIONAL CO.. 61 Sherman St., Maiden, 
Mass., "National" — EQ, TU 

PHILMORE MFG. CO., 113 University 
Place, New York City, "Philmore" — 
EQ, TU 

RADIO CONDENSER CO., Davis St., 
Camden, N. J., "Radio Condenser 
Co.,"— TU 

RADIO ENGINEERING LABORA- 
TORIES, 100 William Ave., Long Island 
City, N. Y., "Rel"— TU 

REL — Radio Engineering Laboratories 

RELIANCE DIE AND STAMPING CO., 
1260 Claybourn Ave., Chicago, 111., "Re- 
liance" — TU 

F. W. SICKLES CO. ,300 Main St., 
Springfield, Mass., "Sickles" — EQ 

TELRADIO ENGINEERING CORP., 484 
Broome St., New York City — EQ 

GENERATORS & CONVERTERS 

Genemotors — G 
Converters — C O N 
Windchargers — W 

AIR FLO — Pioneer Gen-E-Motor Corp. 
AMERICAN TELEVISION & RADIO 

CORP., 128 E. iOth St., St. Paul, Minn., 

"ATR" — CON 
ATR — American Television & Radio Corp. 
AUTONATOR LABORATORIES, INC., 

8440 S. Chicago Ave., Chicago, 111., 

"Autonator" — AC gen for autos 
CARTER MOTOR CO., 365 W. Superior 

St.. Chicago, 111., "Carter Genemotor" 

— G 
GEN-E-ROTOR — Wind Gen-e-Rotor 
KATO ENGINEERING CO., Mankato, 

Minn., "Kato"— CON, W 
PIONEER GEN-E-MOTOR CORP., 46G 

W. Suoerior St., Chicago, 111., "Pio- 
neer," "Air Flo" — COX, G, W — See 

adv. p. 31 
WINCHARGER CORP., 2700 Hawkeye 

Drive, Sioux City, Iowa, "Wincharger" 

— W 
WIND GEN-E-ROTOR. Des Moines, 

Iowa, "Gen-e-rotor" — W 



LINE FILTERS 



AUTOMATIC ELECTRICAL DEVICES 
CO., 324 E. 3rd St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 
"Filterad" 

C-D — Cornell-Dubilier Corp. 

CONSOLIDATED WIRE & ASSOCI- 
ATED CORPS.. Peoria & Harrison 
Sts., Chicago, 111., "Consolidated" 

CONTINENTAL CARBON, INC., 13900 
Lorain Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, "Con- 
tinental" 




For three years the largest supplier of tubes for 
original equipment, s ylvania was among the very first 
to supply substantial quantities of all types of metal 
tubes to manufacturers, jobbers and export trade. 

• Jobbers and retail men know Sylvania tubes. They know they're good 
tubes . . . that they can depend on them. That's because they're set-tested . . . 
actually tested in a receiving set before they're shipped to you. 

And now, our success with the new metal tubes has enhanced our position as 
the largest supplier of glass tubes for original equipment. For Sylvania metal 
tubes have the same high standard of quality you expect and receive from 
Sylvania glass tubes. Whether you're ordering the new metal tubes or the 
familiar glass tubes for replacement, specify Sylvanias ! You'll have a good 
tube and you'll be able to take care of your trade. 

FREE Technical Supplement on the new metal tubes will be sent you on 
request. Address Hygrade Sylvania Corporation, Emporium, Penna, 

SYLVANIA 

THE SET-TESTED RADIO TUBE 

~ © 1935, Hygrade Sylvania Corp. 




R S 



and 
ter- 



ffEfccopy 

,e NEW UTAH 

General Catalog of 

vitalized radio parts 

RADIO PRODUCTS CO., Orleans St., Chicago 



December, 1935 



27 



WHO'S WHO AND WHERE TO BUY 



NGINEERIN 



KenRad 

RadioTubes 

DEPENDABLE LONG LIFE 



First-class engineering 
methods used. Write for 
complete information. 



Glass or Metal 
Radio Tubes 



taadfeS 

WioTube'tt 



THE KENRAD CORPORATION 

Incorporated 

Division of 

The Ken - Rad Tube and Lamp Corp. 
OWENSBORO, KY. 

Also Mfrs. of 

Ken - Rad Incandescent Electric Lamps 



CORNELL-DUBILIER CORP., 4377 
Bronx Blvd., New York City, "C-D," 
"Cornell- Duhilier" 

TOBE DEUTSCHMANN CORP., Canton, 

Mass., "Tobe" 
DUCO — Dumont Electric Co., Inc. 
DUMONT ELECTRIC CO., INC., 514 

Broadway, New York City, "Duco" 
ELIM-O-STAT— Solar Mfg. Co. 
FEDERAL ENGINEERING CORP., 286 

Mercer St., New York City 
FILTERAD — Automatic Electrical De- 
vices Co. 
ICA — Insuline Corp. of America 
INSULINE CORP. OF AMERICA, 25 

Park Place, New York City, "ICA" 
ARTHUR H. LYNCH, INC., 227 Fulton 

St., New York City, "Lynch" 
J. W. MILLER CO.. 5917 S. Main St., 

Los Angeles, Calif., "Miller" 
MUTER CO., 1255 S. Michigan Ave., 

Chicago, 111., "Muter" 
PHILMORE MFG. CO., 113 University 

Place, New York City, "Philmore" 
SOLAR MFG. CO., 599 Broadway, New 

York City, "Elim-O-Stat" 
SPRACO — Sprague Products Co. 
SPRAGUE PRODUCTS CO., North 

Adams, Mass., "Spraco" 
TACO — Technical Appliance Corp. 
TECHNICAL APPLIANCE CORP., 17 

E. 16th St., New York City, "Taco" 
TOBE — Tobe Deutschmann Corp. 

MICROPHONES 

Dynamic — D 
Carbon— CAR 
Condenser— CON 
Crystal— CRY 
Velocity — V 

AMERICAN MICROPHONE CO., INC., 
1915 S. Western Ave., Los Angeles, 
Calif., "American" — CAR, CON, CRY 

AMPERITE CORP., 361 Broadway, 
New York City, "Amperite" — V 

AMPLION PROD. CORP., 38 W. 21st 
St., New York City, "Amplion" 

ASTATIC MICROPHONE LABORA- 
TORY, Box 1312, Yougstown, Ohio, 
"Astatic" — CRY 

AUDIO RESEARCH, INC., 105 E. 16th 
St., New York City, "Audio Research" 
— D 

BELL SOUND SYSTEM, 61 E. Goodale 
St., Columbus, Ohio, "Bell Sound 
Systems" 

BRUNO LABORATORIES, 20 W. 22nd 
St.. New York City, "Bruno Labora- 
tories" — V 

BRUSH DEVELOPMENT CO., 1S93 E. 
40th St., Cleveland, Ohio, "Brush 
Sound Cell Microphones" — CRY 

COLLINS RADIO CO., Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa, "Collins Radio" 

ELECTRICAL LABORATORIES, INC., 
59 E. 21st St., New York City, 
"Walco" 

ELECTRO-VOICE MFG. CO., 324 E. 
Colfax Ave., South Bend, Ind — CAR, V 

GATES RADIO & SUPPLY CO., 115 
North St., Quincy, 111., "Gates" 

LIFE TIME CORP.,1010 Madison Ave., 
Toledo, Ohio, "Life Time" — CAR, 
CON, CRY, V — See adv. p. 35 

MILES REPRODUCER CO., INC., 112 
W. 14th St., New York City, "Miles" 
—CAR 

RADIO AMPLIFIERS LABORATORIES, 
291 E. 137th St., New York City 

RADIO RECEPTOR CO., INC.,' 110 7th 
Ave., New York City, "Radio Re- 
ceptor Co." — D 

RCA MFG. CO., Front and Cooper St., 
Camden, N. J. — CAR, V 

SHURE BROS. CO., 215 W. Huron St., 
Chicago, 111., "Spheroid," "Wave 
Equallized"— CAR, CON, CRY 

SPHEROID — Shure Bros. Co. 

TOLEDO SOUND EQUIPMENT LABO- 
RATORIES. 1147 Jackson St., Toledo, 
Ohio, ••Toledo" 



THE TURNER CO., Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa, "Turner"- — CRY 

UNIVERSAL MICROPHONES CO., 424 
Warren Lane, Inglewood, Calif., 
"Universial" — CAR, CON, CRY, V 

WALCO — Electrical Laboratories, Inc. 

WAVE-EQUALLIZED— Shure Bros. Co. 

"WESTERN ELECTRIC CO., 195 Broad- 
way, New York City, "Western Elec- 
tric" — D, CAR, CON. V 

PUBLIC ADDRESS & AMPLIFIERS 

Amplifiers — AMP 

Preamplifiers— PRE 

Public address systems — PA 

ALLIED RADIO CORP., S32 W. Jackson 
Blvd., Chicago, 111., "Knight" — PA — 
See adv. p. 3S 

AMERICAN MICROPHONE CO., INC., 

1915 S. Western Ave., Los Angeles, 

Calif., "American" — PRE 
AMERICAN SALES CO., 44 W. 18 th 

St., New York City — PA 
AMERICAN TRANSFORMER CO., 174 

Emmet St., Newark, N. J., "Amer- 

tran" — AMP 
AMERTRAN — American Transformer 

Co. 
A.M.I. DISTRIBUTING CO., 450 E. Ohio 

St., Chicago, 111. — PA 
AMPERITE CORP., 361 Broadway, 

New York City, "Amperite" — PRE 
AMPLION PROD. CO., 38 W. 21st St., 

New York City, "Amplion" — AMP 
ANSLEY RADIO CORP., 240 W. 23rd 

St., New York City, "Ansley Dyna- 

phone" — AMP 
AUDIO DEVELOPMENT CO., 4941 

Ewing Ave.. S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

—PA 
BELL SOUND SYSTEMS, INC., 61 E. 

Goodale St., Columbus, Ohio. "Bell 

Sound Systems" — PA 
DAVID BOGEN CO., 626 Broadway, 

New York City — PA 
W. C. BRAUN CO., 601 W. Austin 

Chicago, 111., "Radolek" — AMP — See 

adv. n. 40 
BRUNO LABORATORIES, 20 W. 22nd 

St., New York City, "Bruno Labora- 
tories" — PRE 
CHICAGO MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 

Co., 309 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 

111.— PA 
COAST-TO-COAST RADIO CORP., 599 

Sixth Ave., New York City — PA 
COLUMBIA SOUND CO., 135 Liberty 

St., New York City — PA 
THE DAVEN CO.. 158 Summit St., 

Newark, N. J., "Daven" — AMP 
HERMAN A. DE VRY, INC., 1111 Center 

St., Chicago, 111. — PA 
ELECTRUX SOUND SYSTEMS, 616 

Fifth St. N., Minneapolis, Minn., 

"Electrux" — PA 
FEDERAL ENGINEERING CORP., 286 

Mercer St., New York City — AMP 
FISCHER-SMITH, 162 State St., W. 

Englewood, N. J., "Fischer-Smith" 

AMP 
FOX SOUND EQUIPMENT CO., 3120 

Munroe St., Toledo, Ohio, "Ohio" 

—AMP 
FREEMAN RADIO ENGINEERING 

SERVICE, 248 E. 57th St., New York 

City — PA 
GATES RADIO & SUPPLY CO., 115 

North St., Quincy, 111., "Gates" — AMP, 

PA, PRE 
GAYLORD MFG. CO., 1227 Washington 

Blvd., Chicago, 111., "Gaylord" — PA 
GENERAL RADIO CO., 30 State St.. 

Cambridge A, Mass., "G-R" — Special 
GENERAL SOUND SYSTEM CO., 35 

34th St., Long Island City, N. Y. 
GENERAL TELEVISION & RADIO 

CORP., 267 W. 17th St., New York 

City — PA 
G-R — General Radio Co. 
JACK HODLOWAY, 72 Spring St., New 

York City, "Jack Holloway" — PA 
KNIGHT — Allied Radio Corp. 
LAFAYETTE RADIO MFG. CO., INC., 

100 6th Ave., New York City, "Lafay- 
ette" — PA 



28 



Radio Today 



LA SALLE PRODUCTS CO., 3 40 Wash- 
ington St., New York City, "LaSalle" 
— PA 

LAUREHK RADIO MFG. CO., Adrian, 
Mich., "Laurehk" — PA 

LEOTONE RADIO CO., 63 Dey St., New- 
York City, "Leotone" — PA 
LIFE TIME CORP.. 1010 Madison Ave., 
Toledo, Ohio, "Life Time" — PUE, PA 
.—See adv. p. 35 
LINCOLN INTERNATIONAL INSTRU- 
MENT CORP., 47 Fifth St., Long- 
Island City, N. Y.— AMP 

MACY ENGINEERING CO., 1451 39th 
St., Brooklyn, N. Y., "Macy"— AMP 

MERCEDES PRODUCTION CO., 2235 
Irving Park Blvd., Chicago, 111. — PA 

MILES REPRODUCER CO., INC., 112 
W. 14th St., New York City, "Miles" 
—AMP, PA 

OPERADIO MFG. CO., 13th & Ind. Sts., 
St. Charles, 111., "Operadio" — PA 

PACENT ENGINEERING CORP., 79 
Madison Ave., New York City, 
"Pacent" — PA 

PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION 
CORP., Tioga & C Sts., Philadelphia, 
Pa., "PhilcC — PA 

PICTUR-FONE CORP., 212 W. North 
St., Lima, Ohio, "Pictur-Fone" — PA 

PUBLIC-AD, INC., 2015 East 65th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio, "Public-Ad" — AMP, 
PA 

RACON ELECTRIC CO., INC., 52 E. 
19th St., New York City, "Racon" 
^PA 

RADIO AMPLIFIERS LABORATORIES, 
291 E. 137th St., New York City — 
AMP 

RADIO RECEPTOR CO., INC., 110 7th 
Ave., New York City, "Radio Re- 
ceptor Co." — AM, PA 

RADIOTONE RECORDING CO., 6103 
Melrose Ave., Hollywood, Calif., 
"Radiotone" — AMP 

RADIO & SOUND APPLICATIONS CO., 
2024 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

RADOLEK — W. C. Braun Co. 

RCA MFG. CO., Camden, N. J. — AMP, 
PA. PRE 

REMLER CO., LTD., 2101 Bryant St., 
San Francisco, Calif., "Remler" — PA 

SARA — J & L Sara Co. 

J & L SARA CO., 123 Liberty St., New 
York City, "Sara" 

SEGELSOUND, INC., 235 Pine St., 
Gardiner, Mass., "Segelsound" — PA 

McMURDO SILVER CORP., 3354 N. 
Paulina St., Chicago, 111., "Silver" 
—PA 

SIMPLEX RADIO CO., Sandusky, Ohio, 
"Simplex" — PA 

SOUND SYSTEMS, INC., 1311 Terminal 
Tower, Cleveland, Ohio — PA 

STROMBERG-CARLSON, 100 Carlson 
Road, Rochester, N. Y., "Stromberg- 
Carlson" — PA 

STUYVESANT ELECTRIC CO., 140 
Washington St., New York City — PA 

TOLEDO SOUND EQUIPMENT LABO- 
RATORIES, 1147 Jackson St., Toledo, 
Ohio, "Toledo" — AMP, PA 

TROY RADIO MFG. CO., 1142 S. Olive 
St., Los Angeles, Calif., "Troy" — PA 

THE TURNER CO., Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 
"Turner" — PA 

WARD PRODUCTS CORP., 2135 Supe- 
rior Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, "Ward" 

WEBSTER CO., 3S25 W. Lake St., 
Chicago, 111., "Webster Chicago" — 
AMP, PA 

WEBSTER ELECTRIC CO., Racine, 
Wis., "Webster Electric" — AMP 

WESTERN ELECTRIC CO., 195 Broad- 
way, New York Citv, "Western Elec- 
tric" — AMP, PA, PRE 

WILCO RADIO CO., 1472 Broadway, 
New York City, "Wilco" — PA 



RECORDS 



BLUEBIRD — RCA Mfg. Co. 

BRUNSWICK RECORD CORP.. 1776 
Broadway, New York City, "Bruns- 
wick," "Melotone," "Vocalion" 

COLUMBIA PHONOGRAPH CO., 1776 
Broadway, New York City, 
"Columbia" 

DECCA DISTRIBUTING CO., 799 
Seventh Ave., New York City, "Decca" 



MELOTONE — Brunswick Record Corp. 
RED SEAL — RCA Mfg. Co. 
RCA MFG. CO., Camden, IV. J., "Bine- 
Bird," "Victor" 

VICTOR— RCA Mfg. Co. 

VOCALION — Brunswick Record Corp. 

RECORD PLAYING & 

RECORDING EQUIPMENT 

Automatic record changers — ARC 

Pick-ups— PU 

Players and reproducers — PLA 

Recorders— REC 

Turntables— TT 

A.M.I. DISTRIBUTING CO., 450 E. 
Ohio St., Chicago, 111., "A.M.I."— 
ARC, PLA 

AMPLION PRODUCTS CORP., 3S W. 
21st St., New York City. "Amplion" 
—REC 

ANSLEY DYNAPHONE — Ansley Radio 
Corp. 

ANSLEY RADIO CORP., 240 W. 23rd 
St., New York City, "Ansley Dyna- 
phone" — PLA 

ASTATIC MICROPHONE LABORA- 
TORY, Box 1312, Youngstown, Ohio, 
"Astatic" — PU 

AUDAK CO., 500 Fifth Ave., New York 
City, "Audax" — PU 

AUDAX — Audak Co. 

BELL SOUND SYSTEM, 61 E. Goodale 
St., Columbus, Ohio, "Bell Sound 
Systems," PLA 

COLUMBIA PHONOGRAPH CO., INC., 
1776 Broadway, New York City, 
"Columbia" — PLA 

ELECTRICAL LABORATORIES, INC., 
49 E. 21st St., New York City, 
"Walco" — REC, PU 

ELECTRICAL RESEARCH PRODUCTS, 
INC., 250 W. 57th St., New York City 
—REC 

FILMAVOX — Public-Ad, Inc. 

GENERAL INDUSTRIES, 3537 Taylor 
St., Elyria, Ohio — ARC, TT 

GRAMAPHONE INSTRUMENTS, INC., 
18 E. 48th St., New York City, 
"Gramaphone" — PLA 

JACK HOLLOWAY, 72 Spring St., New 
York City, "Jack Holloway" — REC 

MILES REPRODUCER CO., INC.. 112 
W. 14th St., New York City, "Miles" 
— PLA, REC 

PACENT ENGINEERING CORP., 79 
Madison Ave., New York City, 
"Pacent" — PU 

PHILMORE MFG. CO., 113 University 
Place, New York City, "Philmore" 
— PU 

PRESTO RECORDING CORP., 139 W. 
19th St., New York City, "Presto" — 
REC 

B. A. PROCTOR CO., INC., 17 W. 60th 
St., New York City, "Proctor" — 
PU, REC 

PUBLIC-AD, INC., 2015 E. 65th St., 
Cleveland. Ohio. "Filmavox," 
"Public-AdJ' — REC 

RADIOTONE RECORDING CO., 6109 
Melrose St., Los Angeles, Calif., "Ra- 
diotone" — REC, PLA 

RA3VGERTONE, INC., 201 Verona Ave., 
Newark, N. J., "Rangertone" — PLA, 
REC — Se«i adv. p. 44 

RCA MFG. CO., Camden, N. J., "RCA 
Victor" — PLA, PU, REC 

RCA VICTOR— RCA Mfg. Co. 

UNIVERSAL MICROPHONE CO.. 424 
Warren Lane, Inglewood, Calif., 
"Universal" — REC 

WALCO — Electrical Laboratories, Inc. 

WEBSTER COMPANY, 3825 W. Lake 
St., Chicago, 111., "Webster Chicago" 
—PL, PU, TT 

WEBSTER ELECTRIC CO.. Racine, 
Wis., "Webster Electric" — PU 



RUDOLPH WURLITZER MFG. 
North Tonawanda, N. Y. — ARC 



CO., 




Bridge Tested 

VOLTAGE 
DIVIDERS 

* Why? 

Because critical tubes and circuits 
today demand precision resistance 
values. That's why CLAR0STAT 
Steel-Clad Voltage Dividers are 
individually bridge tested to 
tolerances held within 10% in 
regular production, and 5% or 
less on special order. 

*Hoiv? C 




By careful choice of materials, 
conscientious workmanship and 
thorough test. Selected resist- 
ance wire wound on hakelite strip 
with any pitch or number of turns 
for total resistance and taps. 
Lugs firmly clamped on winding. 
Moisture repellent wrapping. 
Heavy metal jacket. Accurate 
. . . first and last. 



m 



• When? 



f*r 



Use these units for any resist- 
ance values up to 10,000 ohms per 
inch for % inch size, or 7,000 
ohms for y 2 inch size. Maximum 
safe power dissipation per inch: 
2y 2 watts for Y* inch, 1% 
watts for y z inch. Also 5-watt 
units with asbestos core. ^^ 



* Where? 



Ideal for circuits requiring ac- 
curate voltage dividers. Also as 
series resistance. Available in 
any length up to 9 inches. 



* So Write for 



DATA c ° v ering these superior steel-clad volt- 
age dividers as well as CLAR0STAT 
volume controls, flexible resistors, line ballasts, volt- 
age dropping resistors, etc. Submit resistance prob- 
lems for our engineering collaboration. 



CLAROSTAT 

^WAh MANUFACTURING CO. 
^ t %, Incorporated 

<oarostat5 „„.„ _, _. . „ 
5 /In ■§■ 285 North Sixth St. 

^W^ Brooklyn, N. Y. 




December, 1935 



29 



If 



INSTRUMENTS 
COULD TALK 



You co uld easilv find out why each 
TRIPLETT instrument is guaranteed to 
maintain accuracy within 2%. (Some are 
guaranteed to maintain accuracy within 
1%.) 

First the design — 

Tried and checked from every angle. 

Then the selection of material — 
The finest without reservation. 

The construction and assembly — 

Master craftsmen and factory work- 
ers with years of instrument manu- 
facturing training. 

Final inspection — ■ 
Checked by experts 

Each step shouts TRIPLETT Quality 




TWIJi INSTRUMENT 

Standard Combination No. 120 (Same 
dial as used in TRIPLETT Model 1200 
Master Volt-Ohm-Milliammeter) 



Dealer Xet 
Price 



§10-33 



The TWIST also is furnished in any 
combination of A.C. or D.C. Both are 
included in the special rectangular 
molded case that requires a minimum 
of space for special installation. 

Simultaneous readings can be taken on 
both instruments when connected on 
same or separate circuits. Prices on 
special combinations given on request. 

TRIPLETT manufactures a wide range 
of standard 2", 3", 4" and 5" electrical 
measuring instruments. 

Write for Catalogue 
SEE YOUR JOBBER 



PAAcidian 

ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENTS 
E*-EJL ------- TOO A I 

I Triplett Eleetrieal Instrument Co. ] 
. 1912 Harmon Ave. 




Bluft'ton, Ohio 



Please send me the new TRIPLETT | 
I 1936 Catalog ' 



I 



City. 



State I 



WHO'S WHO AND WHERE TO BUY 



RESISTORS 

ComDosition — C 
Precision— PREC 
Specialties — SP 
Variable— VAR 
Volume controls — VC 
Wire— W 

AEROVOX CORP.. 70 Washington St.. 
Brooklyn, N". Y., "Aerovox," "Pyr- 
ohnis," "Slideohni" — C, W — See adv. p. 
40 

ALLEN-BRADLEY CO., 1326 S. Second 
St., Milwaukee, Wis., "Bradley" — 
VAR, VC 

ATLAS RESISTOR CO., 423 Broome St.. 
New York City, "Atlas" — W 

BLUEJACKET^Lynch Mfg. Co. 

BOND RADIO CO., 11702 Livernois 

Ave., Detroit, Mich., "Bonrad" — C, 

VC, W 

BONRAD — The Bond Radio Co. 

BRADLEY— The Allen-Bradley Co. 

BROWN DEVIL — Ohmite Mfg. Co. 

CANDOHMS — Muter Co. 

CARTER — Utah Radio Products Co. 

CENTRALAB, 900 E. Keefe Ave., Mil- 
waukee, Wis., "Centralab" — C, VC — 
See adv. ». 33 

CHICAGO TELEPHONE SUPPLY CO., 
1142-1228 W. Beardsley Ave., Elk- 
hart, Ind., "CTS Co.," "Frost Radio" — 
SP, VAR, VC 

CLAROSTAT MFG. CO., 2S5 N. Sixth 

Ave., Brooklyn, N\ Y PREC, SP, VC, 

VAR, W — See adv. p. 29 

CONTINENTAL CARBON, INC., 13900 
Lorain Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, "Con- 
tinental" — C 

CROHM— Lynch Mfg .Co. 

CTS — Chicago Telephone Supply Oo. 

THE DAVEN CO.. 158-60 Summit St., 
Newark, N. J., "Daven" — SP, VAR 

DE JUR-AMSCO CORP.. 95 Morton St., 
New York Citv, "De Jur-Amsco" 
—VAR 

DYNOHMIC^Lynch Mfg. Co. 

ELECTRAD, INC., 175 Varick St., New- 
York City, "Electrad," "Truvolt"- — 
PREC, VC, W 

ELECTRO MOTIVE MFG. CO., INC., 
707 E. 140th St., New York City, "El 
Menco" — C, W 

EL MENCO — Electro Motive Mfg. Co., 
Inc. 

ERIE RESISTOR CORP., 644 W. 12th 
St., Erie, Pa., "Erie" — C 

FROST RADIO — C h i c a g o Telephone 
Supply Co. 

GENERAL RADIO CO.. 30 State St., 
Cambridge, Mass., "GR" — SP, VAR 

G-H — Girard-Hopkins 

GIRARD HOPKINS, 1437 23rd Ave., 
Oakland, Calif., "G-H" — C 

GLOBAR CORP., Niagara Falls, N. Y., 
"Globar" — C — Mfrs. only 

GOLD STANDARD— Lynch Mfg. Co. 

HARDWICK & HINDLE, INC.. 40 
Herman St., Newark, N. J., "H & H" 
—VAR, W . 

H & H — Hardwick & Hindle, Inc. 

INTERNATIONAL RESISTANCE CO., 
401 N. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa., 
"IRC," "Metallized." "IRC Power" — 
C, PREC, VC. W — See adv. p. 37 

LYNCH MFG. CO.. 23 North Ave., Cran- 
ford, N. J., "Bluejacket," "Crohm." 
"Dyohmic," "Lynch," "Gold Standard" 
— C, PREC, W 

METALLIZED— International Resist- 
ance Co. 

MICAMOLD RADIO CORP., 1087 Flush- 
ing Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. — C, W 

MICROHM — Precision Resistor Co. 

MORRILL & MORRILL. 30 Church St., 
New York City, "Morrill" — C, PREC 

MUTER CO., 1255 S. Michigan Ave., 
Chicago, 111., "Candohms" — W — See 
adv. p. 35 

OHIO CARBON CO., 12508 Berea Road, 

Lakewood, Ohio, "Ohiohm" — C 
OHIOHM — Ohio Carbon Co. 



OHMITE MFG. CO., 4S35 W. Flournoy 
St., Chicago, 111., "Ohmite," "Brown- 
devil," "Red Devil" — VAR 

PACENT ENGINEERING CORP., 79 
Madison Ave., New York Citv, "Pa- 
cent" — VAR 

PHILMORE MFG. CO., 113 University 
Place, New York City, "Philmore" — 
VC, W 

PRECISION APPARATCS CORP., 821 
E. New Y'ork Ave., Brooklvn, N. Y. 
— PREC 

PRECISION RESISTOR CO., 334 Badger 
Ave., Newark, N. J., "Microhm" — 
PREC, SP, W 

PYROHM— Aerovox Corp. 

READRITE METER WORKS, 136 E. 
College Ave., Bluit'ton, Ohio, "Read- 
rite" — PREC 

RED DEVIL— Ohmite Co. 
SHALLCROSS MFG. CO.. 700 MacDade 

Blvd., Collingsdale, Pa., "Shallcross" 

—PREC 
SLIDEOHM — Aerovox Corp. 
SPEER CARBON CO., St. Marys, Pa., 

"Speer" — C 
STACKPOLE CARBON CO., Tannery 

St., St. Marys, Pa., "Stackpole" — C, VC 
SUPREME INSTRUMENTS CO., Howard 

St., Greenwood, Miss., "Supreme" — 

PREC 

TECH LABORATORIES, 703 Newark 
Ave., Jersey City, N. J., SP, VAR 

TRIPLETT ELECTRICAL INSTRU- 
MENT CO.. 122 Main St., Bluffton, 
Ohio, "Triplett" — PREC 

TRUVOLT— Electrad, Inc. 

UTAH RADIO PRODUCTS CO., 820 
Orleans St., Chicago. 111., "Carter" — 
C, VC, W 

VAN— D. L. Van Leuven 

D. L. VAN LEUVEN, 410 E. 15th St., 
New York City, "VAN" — PREC 

WARD LEONARD ELECTRIC CO., Mt. 
Vernon, N. Y., "Ward Leonard" — W 

S. S. WHITE DENTAL MFG. CO., In- 
dustrial Division, 10 East 40th St., 
New York City — Moulded 

WIRT CO., 5221 Green St., Philadelphia, 
Pa., "Wirtco" — C, VC, W 

WIRTCO — Wirt Co. 

YAXLEY MFG. CO., 3029 E. Washing- 
ton St., Indianapolis, Ind., "Yaxley" 
—VAR, VC 



SPEAKERS & PARTS 

AMERICAN REPRODUCER CO., 3115 

Carroll Ave., Chicago, 111. 
AMPLION PRODUCTS CORP., 38 W. 

21st St., New York City, "Amplion" 
ARISTON MFG. CORP., 4045 Diversey 

Ave., Chicago, 111. 
ARLAB MFG. CO., 1250 N. Paulina St.. 

Chicago, 111., "Arlab" 
BALDWIN — Consolidated Radio Prod- 
ucts Co. 
BOND RADIO CO., 11702 Livernois 

Ave., Detroit, Mich.. "Bonrad" 
BONRAD — Bond Radio Co. 
BRUSH DEVELOPMENT CO., 1893 E. 

40th St., Cleveland, Ohio 
C. F. CANNON CO., Springwater, N. Y., 

"Cannonball" — headphones only 
CARRON MFG. CO., 415 S. Aberdeen 

St., Chicago, 111.," Carron" — Cones and 

field only 
CONSOLIDATED RADIO PRODUCTS 

CO., 363 W. Superior St., Chicago, 111., 

"Baldwin" — See adv. p. 41 
FOX SOUND EQUIPMENT CO., 3120 

Munroe St., Toledo, Ohio, "Fox" 
HAWLEY PRODUCTS CO., St. Charles, 

111. — Cones only 
HOPE MFG. CO., 401 Broadway, New 

York City, "Hope" 
JENSEN RADIO MFG. CO., 6601 S. 

Laramie Ave., Chicago, 111., "Jensen" 
LEOTONE RADIO CO., 63 Dey St., 

New York City, "Leotone" — Cones &■ 

field only 
LIFE TIME CORP., 1010 Madison Ave., 

Toledo, Ohio, "Lifetime" — See adv. p. 

35 



30 



Radio Today 



MACT ENGINEERING CO., 1451 39th 
St., Brooklyn, N. Y., "Macy" 

MAGNAVOX CO., 2131 Bueter Road, 
Fort Wayne, Ind., "Magnavox" 

MILES REPRODUCER CO., INC., 112 
W. 14th St., New York City, "Miles" 

MULTIPLEX RADIO SERVICE, INC.. 

88 Fourth St., Brooklyn, jV. Y Fields 

&. cones only — See adv. p. 40 

OPERADIO MFG. CO., 13th & Ind. Sts.. 
St. Charles, 111., "Operadio" 

OXFORD TARTAR RADIO CORP., 330 
W. Huron St., Chicago, 111., "Oxford" 
— See adv. p. 41 

PACENT ENGINEERING CORP., 79 
Madison Ave., New York City, 
"Pacent" 

PHILMORE MFG. CO., 113 University 
Place, New York City, "Philmore" 

PREMIER PRODUCTS, INC., Grace & 
Ravenswood Ave. S., Chicago, 111., 
"Premier" 

QUAM-NICHOI.S CO.. 1015-35 \V. 74th 
St., Chicago, 111., "0.uam" — See adv. p. 
39 

RACON ELECTRIC CO., INC., 52 E. 
19th St., New York City, "Racon" 

RADIO RECEPTOR CO., INC., 110 7th 
Ave., New York City 

ROLA CO., 2530 Superior Ave., Cleve- 
land, Ohio, "Rola" 

SONOCHORDE SALES CO., 200 Boston 
Ave., Medford, Mass., "Sonochorde" 

TOLEDO SOUND EQUIPMENT LABO- 
RATORIES, 1147 Jackson St., Toledo, 
Ohio, "Toledo" 

UNITED PRESSED PRODUCTS CO., 
407 S. Aberdeen St., Chicago, 111. — 
Cones only 

XJTAH RADIO PRODUCTS CO., S20 
Orleans St., Chicago, 111., "Utah" 

VITAVOX SALES CO., 557 W. Jackson 
Blvd., Chicago 111., "Vitavox" 

WESTERN ELECTRIC CO., 195 Broad- 
way, New York City, "Western 
Electric" 

WILLIAM WELCH CO., Chicago, III. — 
Cones only 

WRIGHT-DE COSTER, INC., 2235 Uni- 
versity Ave., St. Paul, Minn., "Wright- 
De Coster" 



TEST EQUIPMENT 

Adapters — AD 

Cathode-ray oscillographs — CRS 

Condenser testers — CT 

Meters — M 

Multi-meters — M M 

Oscillators (sig. gen.) — OSC 

Set analyzers and testers — SA 

Tube testers— TT 

Vibrator testers — VT 

Vacuum tube voltmeters — VTV 

ALDEN PRODUCTS CO., 715 Center 
St., Brockton, Mass., "Na-Ald" — AD — 
See adv. p. 34 

APPARATUS DESIGN CO., Little Rock, 

Arlc, "Confidence" — CT, Res. Bridge, 

TT 
BOONTON RADIO CORP., Boonton, N. J. 

— "Q Meter" Factory & Dab. Equip. 
BUDD RADIO, INC., 1937 E. 55th St., 

Cleveland, Ohio, "Bud" — AD 
BURTON-ROGERS CO., 755 Boylston 

St., Boston, Mass., "Burton" — SA, TT, 

OSC 
CHEKATUBE— J-M-P Mfg. Co. 
CLOUGH-BRENGLE CO., 1134 W. Aus- 
tin Ave., Chicago, 111., "Clough- 

Brengle" — CRS, MM, OSC 
CONFIDENCE — Apparatus Design Co. 
THE DAVEN CO., 158 Summit St.. 

Newark, N. J.. "Daven" — M 
TOBE DEUTSCHMAN CORP., Canton, 

Mass., "Tobe" — CT 
ALLEN B. DUMONT LABORATORIES, 

542 Valley Road, Upper Montclair. 

N. J., "Dumont" — CRO 
DAYRAD — Radio Products Co. 
DEPENDABLE — Radio City Products 

Co. 
ELECTRICAL WINDING CORP., 22 

Wooster St., New York City — CRO, 

OSC 
ELECTRONOMETER — Precision Appa- 
ratus Corp. 
FERRANTI ELECTRIC, INC., 130 W. 

42nd St., New York City, "Ferranti" 

— M 



FERRIS INSTRUMENT CORP.. Boon- 
ton, N. J., Factory & Lab. Equip. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 1285 Bos- 
ton Ave., Bridgeport, Conn., "General 
Electric" — CRO, M 

GENERAL RADIO CO., 20 State St., 
Cambridge A, Mass., "GR" — Factory 
& Lab. Equip. 

GR — General Radio Co. 

HICKOK ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT 
CO., 10516 Dupont Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio, "Hickok" — M, OSC. SA, TT 

ICA — Insuline Corp. of America 

INSULINE CORP. OF AMERICA, 25 
Park Place, New York City, "ICA" — 
AD, VTV 

JACKSON ELECTRICAL INSTRU- 
MENT CO., 430 Kiser St., Dayton, 
Ohio, "Jackson" — OSC, SA, TT 

J-M-P MFG. CO., 3048 N. 34th St., Mil- 
waukee, Wis., "Chekatube" — TT 

LINCOLN INTERNATIONAL INSTRU- 
MENT CORP., 47 Fifth St., Long 
Island City, N. Y. — VTV 

LITTLEFUSE LABORATORIES, 4244 
Lincoln Ave., Chicago, 111., "Little- 
fuse" — Instrument Fuses 

J. W. MILLER CO., 5917 S. Main St., 
Los Angeles, Calif., "Miller" — OSC 

MILLION RADIO & TELEVISION 
LABORATORIES, 361 W. Superior St., 
Chicago, 111., "Million" — TT, VT 

MUTER CO., 1255 S.. Michigan Ave., 
Chicago, 111., "Muter" — Res. Bridge, 
Decade Res. 

NA-ALD — Alden Products Co. — AD 

OHMITE MFG. CO., 4835 W. Flourney 
St., Chicago, 111., "Determohm" — 
Decade Res. 

PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORP., 
Philadelphia, Pa., "Philco" — OSC 

PRECISION APPARATUS CORP., 821 
E. New York Ave., Brooklyn, ST. Y., 
"Electronometer" — SA — See adv. p, 41 

Q-METER — Boonton Radio Corp. 

RACO — Radio Construction Labs. 

RADIO CITY PRODUCTS CO., INC., 88 
Park Place, New York City, "De- 
pendable" — MM, TT 



Don't put this issue /WAY 

—pot it TO WORK/ 

Radio's only directory 

"WHO'S WHO & WHERE TO BUY" 

is published in this issue for 
the benefit of all readers 

RADIO TODAY'S annual directory was compiled 
with the cooperation of manufacturers in all 
divisions of the industry. It is published IN the 
magazine to supply a much-needed service to every- 
one in the industry and trade. 

This is the first time in eight years that the industry 
has had a directory of this kind. 

The directory is invaluable as a ready reference work. 
USE it to look up sources of supply, to find the name 
of a manufacturer, a product, a trade name, part, etc. 
It will answer most of your questions instantly. It 
will serve you all year round. 

Hold fast to your copy. It may be difficult to get 
another. But make it go to work! 

RADIO 
TODAY 

Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexinston Ave., N. Y. 



NO MORE 



with ' I 



FARM 
RADIOS. 1 



/ 



ELL the Pioneer Air-Flo Battery 
Charger or a Pioneer Gas Engine 
Generator with every battery energized 
radio set! Eliminate all battery charging 
trouble — insure thorough satisfaction. 
The Pioneer Air-F!o Battery Charger 
is sold at the lowest dealer price of 
all windchargers. It's built of new 
parts throughout, no rebuilt parts 
used. It's an engineered job! 





DlONEER Gas-Engine Driven 
Generators are built in all 
sizes with capacities of 150 
watts and more. Thoroughly 
dependable and economical 
service, generating both AC 
110 or 220 volts and DC for 
charging batteries for lights, 
radio, etc. 

WRITE TODAY FOR 
COMPLETE DETAILS 



PIONEER GEN-E-MOTOR CORP. 

462-H W. SUPERIOR ST., CHICAGO 

Cable Address: SIMONTRICE, New York 



December, 1935 



31 



COIUPLETE 



I 



4!*ia 



SSes 



rfp, 



*U 



ro 



IN Jjj 



HA 



T JONA 






Get on the Profit Side 

with 

NATIONAL UNION 

THE COMPLETE 

QUALITY TUBE LINE 



NATIONAL UNION RADIO CORP of N. Y. 

570 LEXINGTON AVENUE 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 



WHO'S WHO AND WHERE TO BUY 



RADIO CONSTRUCTION LABS, 136 
Liberty St., New York City, "Raco" — 
OSC 

RADIO PRODUCTS CO., 125 Sunrise 
Place, Dayton, Ohio, "Dayrad" — MM, 
OSC, SA, TT, VT — See adv. p. 17 

RCA MFG. CO.. Camden, N. J. — CRS, 
OSC 

READRITE METER WORKS, 126 E. 
College Ave., Bluffton, Ohio, "Read- 
rite," — M. OSC, SA, TT — See adv. p. 
36 

SHALLCROSS MFG. CO., 700 MacDade 
Blvd., Collingdale, Pa., "Shallcross"— 
MM, SA 

SOLAR MFG. CORP., 559 Broadway, 
New York City, "Solar" — CT 

SPRAGUE PRODUCTS CO., North 
Adams, Mass., "Spaco" — CT, Inter- 
ference Analyzer 

SUPREME INSTRUMENTS CO., Howard 
St., Greenwood, Miss., "Supreme" — 
M, OSC, SA, TT 

TECH LABORATORIES, 703 Newark 
Ave., Jersey City, N. J. — M 

THE TEFPT RADIO CO., Plymouth, 
Mich., "Tefft" — SA, TT 

TOBE — The Tobe Deutschman Corp. 

TRIPLETT ELECTRICAL INSTRU- 
MENT CORP., 122 Main St., Bluflton, 
Ohio, "Triplett" — M, OSC, SA, TC — 
See adv. i>. 30 

TRIUMPH MFG. CO., 4017 W. Lake St., 
Chicago, 111., "Triumph" — CRO, MM, 
OSC, TT 

ULTRAMAR MFG. CORP., 1160 
Chatham Court, Chicago, 111., "Ultra- 
mar" — OSC 

VAN — D. L. Van Leuven 

D. L. VAN LEUVEN, 410 E. 15th St., 

New York City, "Van" — Meter Dials 
EARL WEBBER CO., 1217 Washington 

Blvd., Chicago, 111., "Webber" — OSC, 

SA, TT 
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CO., 

Pittsburgh, Pa., "Westinghouse" — MM 
WESTON ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT 

CORP., 614 Frelinghuvsen Ave., 

Newark, N. J., "Weston" — M, OSC, 

SA, TT 
WRIGHT-DE COSTER, INC., 2235 Uni- 

v e r s i t y Ave., St. Paul, Minn., 

"Wright-De Coster" — M u 1 1 i - T e s t 

Speaker 

TRANSFORMERS 

Audio — A 
Chokes— C 
Power — P 

AADLOY TRANSFORMER CO., INC., 

135 Liberty St., New York City, "Aal- 

loy"— A, C, P 
ACME ELECTRIC & MFG. CO., 1447 

Hamilton Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, 

"Acme" — A, C, P 
AMERICAN TRANSFORMER CO., 17S 

Emmet St., Newark, N. J., "Amertran" 

A, C. P 
AMERTRAN — American Transformer Co. 
BOND RADIO CO,, 11702 Livernois Ave., 

Detroit, Mich., "Bonrad"— A, C, P. 
BONRAD — Bond Radio Co. 
CHICAGO TRANSFORMER CO., 2626 W. 

Washington Blvd., Chicago, 111. — A, C, P 
COLLINS RADIO CO., Cedar Rapids, 

Iowa, "Collins Radio" — A, C, P 
DONGAN ELECTRIC MFG. CO., 2985 

Franklin St., Detroit, Mich., "Dongan" 

—A, C, P 
FERRANTI ELECTRIC, INC., 130 W. 

42nd St., New York City, "Ferranti" — 

A, C, P 
FREED TRANSFORMER CO., 100 6th 

Ave., New York City, "Freed" — A, C, P 
GENERAL RADIO CO., 30 State St., 

Cambridge, Mass., "G-R" — Special pur- 
pose 
GENERAL TRANSFORMER CORP., 500 

S. Throop St., Chicago, 111., "General" — 

A, C, P 
G-R — General Radio Co. 
HALLDORSON CO., 4500 Ravenswood 

Ave., Chicago, 111., "Halldorson" — 

A. C, P 



JEFFERSON ELECTRIC CO., 900 25th 
Ave., Bellwood, 111., "Jefferson" — 
A, C, P 

KENTON TRANSFORMER CO., INC., 
840 Barry St., New York City, "Ken- 
yon"— A, C. P 

LIFE TIME CORP., 1010 Madison Ave., 
Toledo, Ohio, "Life Time" — A, P 

NATIONAL CO., 61 Sherman St., Maiden, 
Mass. — A, P 

NATIONAL MILL SUPPLY CO., 207 E. 
Columbia St.. Fort Wayne, Ind., "Na- 
tional"— A, C, P 

NORDENDADE MFG. CO., 2100 Fulton 
St., Chicago, 111.— A, C 

OXFORD TARTAK RADIO CORP., 350 
W. Huron St., Chicago, 111., "Oxford" 
— A. C 

PACENT ENGINEERING CORP., 79 
Madison Ave., New York City, "Pa- 
cent" — A, C, P 

PHILMORE MFG. CO., 113 University 
Place, New York City, "Philmore" — A 

RAYTHEON MFG. CO., 190 Willow St., 
Waltham, Mass., "Raytheon" — A, C, P 

STANCOR— Standard Transformer Corp. 

STANDARD TRANSFORMER CORP., 
850 Blackhawk St., Chicago, 111., "Stan- 
cor" — A, C, P 

THORDARDSON ELECTRIC MFG. CO., 
500 W. Huron St., Chicago, 111., "Thor- 
dardson"- — A, C, P 

TRANS-LAB, INC., Canton, Mass., 
"Trans-Lab" 

UNITED TRANSFORMER CORP., 72 
Spring St,, New York City, "UTC", 
"United"— A, C, P 

UTAH RADIO PRODUCTS, 820 Orleans 
St., Chicago, 111., "Utah" — A, C, P 

UTC — United Transformer Corp. 

TRANSMITTERS, COMMERCIAL 

AIRCRAFT RADIO CORP., Boonton, 
N. J. 

COLLINS RADIO CO., Cedar Rapids. 
Iowa, "Collins Radio" 

DOODITTLE & FALKNOR, INC., 7415 
Loomis Blvd., Chicago, 111., "Doolittle 
& Falknor" 

FRED M. LINK, 125 W. 17th St., New 
York City 

GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., "General Electric" 

LEAR DEVELOPMENT CO., 121 W. 
17th St., New York City 

MARINE RADIO CO., 124 101st Ave., 
Richmond Hill, Long Island, N. Y., 
"Marine" 

RADIO TRANSCEIVER LABORA- 
TORIES, 86 115th St., Richmond Hill, 
Dong Island, N. Y., "Radio Trans- 
ceiver Laboratories" — Ultra-high 
freq. only 

RCA MFG. CO., Front & Cooper Sts., 
Camden, N. J. 

WESTERN ELECTRIC CO., 195 Broad- 
way, New York City, "Western Elec- 
tric" 

WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CO., 
Chicopee Falls, Mass., "Westing- 
house" 



TUBES, RECEIVING 



ARCTURUS RADIO TUBE CO., 720 
Frelinghuysen Ave., Newark, N. J., 
"Arcturus," "Coronet" — See adv. p, 
25 

CHAMPION RADIO WORKS, Lynn, 

Mass., "Champion" 
CORONET — Arcturus Radio Tube Co. 
CROSLEY RADIO CORP., Cincinnati, 

Ohio, "Crosley" 
GOLD SEAL MFG. CO., INC., Grant 

Ave., East Newark, N. J., "Gold Seal" 
HYGRADE SYLVANIA CORP., 500 

Fifth Ave., New York City, "Sylvania" 

—See adv. p. 27 
HYTRON CORP., 23 New Derby St., 

Salem, Mass., "Hytron" 



32 



Radio Today 



KEX-RAD CORP., Owensboro, Ky, 
"Ken-Rad" — See adv. p. 2S 

NATIOXAL UNION RADIO CORP., 570 
Lexington Ave., New York City, 
National Vnion" — See adv. p. 32 

PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORP., 
Tioea <&: C Sts., Philadelphia, Pa., 
"Philco" 

RAYTHEON' PRODUCTION CORP., 30 
East 42nd St., New York City, "Ray- 
theon" 

RCA MFC, CO. — RCA Radiotron Div., 
Camden, N. J., "RCA Radiotron" 

RCA RADIOTRON — RCA Mfg. Co. 

REPUBLIC RADIO MFG. CO., 76 Coit 

St., Irvington, N. J. 
SPARKS-WITHINGTON CO., E. Gan- 

son Ave., Jackson, Mich., "Sparton" 
SPARTON — Sparks-Withington Co. 
SYLVANIA — Hygrade Sylvania Corp. 
TRIAD MFG. CO., INC., Blackstone & 

Fountain Sts., Pawtucket, R. I., 

"Triad" 
TUNG-SOL LAMP WORKS, IXC, Radio 

Tube Div., Newark, N. J., - "Tung-Sol" 
ZENITH RADIO CORP., 3620 Iron St., 

Chicago, 111., "Zenith" 

TUBES, TRANSMITTING & 
SPECIAL PURPOSE 

Cathode-ray— CRT 
Photo-cells— PC 
Special tubes— SP 
Transmitting— TT 

AMPEREX ELECTRONICS PRODUCTS 
CORP., 79 "Washington St., Brooklyn, 
N. Y., "Amperex" — SP, TT 

CETRON — Continental Electric Co. 

CONTINENTAL ELECTRIC CO.. St. 
Charles, 111., "Cetron," "Economy" — 
PC, SP 

ALLEN B. DUMONT LABORATORIES, 
542 Vallev Road, Upper Montclair, 
N. J., "Dumont" — CRT 

HUGH H. EBY, INC., 2006 Hunting 
Park Ave., Philadelphia. Pa., "Ebv" 
— PE 

ECONOMY — Continental Electric Co. 

EIMAC— Eitel-McCullough, Inc. 

EITEL-McCULLOUGH, INC., San Bruno, 
Calif., "Eimac" — TT 

FEDERAL RADIO & TELEGRAPH 
CO., Mt. Pleasant Ave., Newark, N. J., 
"Federal" — TT 



GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 12S5 Bos- 
ton Ave., Bridgeport, Conn., "General 
Electric" — CRT, SP 

HEINTZ & KAUFMAN, San Bruno, 
Calif. — TT 

NATIONAL RADIO TUBE CO., 3420 
18th St., San Francisco, Calif. — TT 

RAYTHEON PRODUCTION CORP., 30 
E. 42nd St., New York City, "Ray- 
theon" — TT 

ROA MFG. CO., Front & Cooper Sts., 
Camden, N. J. — CRT, PG, SP, TT 

TAYLOR TUBE CO., 2607 W. Cermak 
Road, Chicago, 111., "Taylor" — SP, TT 

UNITED ELECTRONICS CORP., 42 
Spring St., Newark, N. J., "United" 
— TT 

WESTERN ELECTRIC CO.. 195 Broad- 
way, New York City, "Western Elec- 
tric" — CRT, SP, TT 

WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CO., 
Pittsburgh, Pa., "Westing-house" — 
TT, SP 



VIBRATORS 



AMERICAN TELEVISION AND RADIO 
CORP., 123 E. 10th St., St. Paul, Minn., 
"ATR" 

ATR — American Television & Radio Corp. 

ELECTRONIC LABORATORIES, INC., 
122 E. New York Ave., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

P. R. MALLORY & CO., INC., "Mallory" 

OAK MFG. CO., 711 W. Lake St., Chi- 
cago, 111., "Oak" 

THE RADIART CORP., Shaw Ave. at 
133rd St., Cleveland, Ohio, "Radiart" 

UTAH RADIO PRODUCTS CO., S20 
Orleans St., Chicago, 111., '-Utah" — 
See adv. p. 27 

WAVE-CHANGING SWITCHES 

BEST MFG. CO., 1200 Grove St., Irv- 
ington, N. J., "Best" 

HUGH H. EBY, INC., 2066 Hunting- 
Park Ave., Philadelphia, Pa., "Eby" 

INSULINE CORP. OF AMERICA, 25 
Park Place, New York City, "ICA" 

OAK MFG. CO., 711 W. Lake St.. 
Chicago, 111., "Oak" 

OHMITE MFG. CO., 4835 W. Flournoy 
St., Chicago, 111., "Ohmite" 

PHILMORE MFG. CO., 113 University 
Place, New York City, "Philmore" 

YAXLEY MFG. CO., 3029 E. Washing- 
ton St., Indianapolis, Ind., "Yaxley" 



SERVICE NOTES-JOHN RIDER 



Visual Alignment at 600 kc. 

* There has been some 
confusion concerning the proper pro- 
cedure to be followed in checking the 
alignment of the series oscillator 
trimmer at the low frequency end of 
a band, as for example, at 600 kc. To 
clear up this matter, we shall go over 
this procedure in some detail. 

When working with a normal out- 
put meter type of indicator, it is nec- 
essary to rock the gang condenser on 
the receiver. However, when working 
with a visual alignment arrangement 
as, for example, an oscillograph, it is 
not necessary to rock the tuning con- 
denser inasmuch as the frequency 
modulator unit supplies a signal of 
a pre-determined band of frequencies. 
This is, in effect, equivalent of rock- 
ing. In view of the difference in the 



pattern which appears on the cathode- 
ray oscillograph screen for adjust- 
ment of the various trimmers, and 
that which is the correct pattern to 
indicate the correct adjustment of the 
oscillator padder at 600 kc, the fol- 
lowing explanation is necessary. 

To take a concrete illustration, an 
intermediate frequency of 260 kc. is 
assumed and we shall illustrate the 
type of patterns which appear upon 
the oscillograph screen for single 
trace and double trace images when 
adjusting the oscillator padder at 600 
kc. The first step after aligning the 
i-f. amplifier is to align the first de- 
tector and oscillator shunt trimmers 
in the conventional way at the high- 
frequency end of the broadcast band, 
say at 1,400 kc. "With this completed, 
the test oscillator is set at the proper 




^CtnTRRLRB 



Every serviceman from coast to 
coast knows Centralab . . , every- 
body's his friend and the worst 
thing his enemies can say is that 
he's a mighty smooth article. 

Yes . . . he's smooth all-right 
. . . and it's that famous non- 
rubbing contact that makes him 
"that way." 




Centralab 
smoothness re- 
sults from the 
patented Cen- 
tralab non - 
rubbing con- 
tact whereby 
a strip of pol- 
ished metal 
rocks on the 
resistor so that 
the only rub- 
bing action is 
between an oil - 
less wood bear- 
ing and the 
polished metal. 



CENTRALAB RESISTORS 

look like stone and Cii)^ 
are as sturdy — 
baptized with Fire 
at 2500 degrees F. 
Metal sprayed end 
contacts. 



Centralab 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

RADIOHMS 

FIXED RESISTORS 

SOUND PROJECTION 

CONTROLS 




December, 1935 



33 





Here's the Story on Testing 
the New Metal Tubes 

TUBE CHECKING ADAPTER 950-GEM 

Here is the adapter 
you need if your tube 
checker can test the 
type36tube. Tests all of 
the metal tubes quickly, 
easily and completely. 
Single compact self- 
contained unit. Rugged 
and dependable. 

Approved by metal 
tube engineers. 

950-&EM Adapter List Price $6.50 

TUBE CHECKER ADAPTER KIT 
Here is the 900-RCA 

adapter kit as 

recommen ded 

by RCA engi- 
neers for RCA 

d istributors 

and dealers. 

Thousands o f 

these kits are 

now in use. Requires that tube tester be 

able to test 6A7, 4,2, 75, 76, 77, 78, 80 and 

S5 tubes to accommodate adapters. 

900-RCA Adapter Kit List Price $6.40 

TIBE CHECKER ADAPTER KIT 

900-GE 

These adapter kits 
are recommended by 
G. E. engineers for 
G. E. distributors and 
dealers for checking 
the metal tubes. 
Thousands are now In 
use. To use this kit a 
tube tester must be 
able to test the 37. 
41, 42, 77, 78 and 80 

tubes. Checks each plate of the 6H6 tube. 

Dual grid clip replacement lead supplied. 

9QOGE Adapter Kit List Price $4.S0 

INDIVIDUAL ADAPTERS 

944M1 (shown at right) and 

9S7M1A check all metal 

tubes in Supreme 35, 45, 85 

andsimilar emission testers. 

944M1 — 987M1A 

List Price $3.00 pair 

985M3 similar in appearance 

to tall adapter in 900GE 

Kit tests all metal tubes in Ave contact TJY 

socket of any emission type tube tester. 

985M3 Adapter List Price $2.50 

Individual adapters are also available for 

radio set modernization by replacing glass 

tubes with their metal tube counterparts. 

These adapters list at $1.00 each. 





NEW- 



OCTAL LOCKING ANALYZER 
PLUG KIT 

Here is a new deal in an- 
alyzer plugs and adapters. 
Plug has new locking type 
octal base. Adapters have 
short bodies and no studs 
for ultra-compactness. 

Unique quick - fitting 
10-prong cable plug sup- 
plied attached to 9-wire 
cable with 10 - contact 
socket to match. 

Six new compact adapt- 
ers supplied for 4, 5, 6,' 
7 large, 7 small and S- 
hole sockets. Complete as 
illustrated and described 
90S C Kit List Price $11.50 

BLOCKED OCTAL 
SOCKETS 

New sets like Atwater- 
Kent and Zenith have 
blocked octal sockets in 
which no holes are 
punched where tube 
Iprongs are omitted. 

Hence, to insert an 
analyzer plug, adapters 
are necessary. 
It has been suggested that these hole posi- 
tions be drilled out or that these "blocked" 
sockets be replaced with 8-hole octal types. 
It certainly would not take many socket 
replacement jobs to equal the cost of an 
adapter at 60 cents net (without stud), 
75 cents net (with). Why not get the 
necessary adapters and avoid tearing 
out riveted sockets from new sets, 
Get your name on our mailing list for 

the new 1936 catalog. 
Na-Ald items are widely stocked — try your regular 
supplier — if he hasn't them and does not care to 
(jet the genuine Na-Ald products order direct from us. 
ALDEN PRODUCTS CO. 
k-ALC Dept. RT12 715 Centre St. 

BROCKTON, MASS. 




SERVICE NOTES-JOHN RIDER 



point so that when frequency modu- 
lated, it is producing a mean fre- 
quency of 600 kc. Output of this os- 
cillator then is connected across the 
antenna and ground posts of the re- 
ceiver under test. Let us assume that 
as a result of the frequency modula- 
tion, the output signal covers a band 
of from 585 to 615 kc. The receiver 
is tuned to 600 kc. and the resonance 
curve appears on the screen. From 
this point on we shall consider first, 
the procedure when the single-image 
system of frequency modulation is 
used. 

Single image alignment 

In this case there will be just a 
single trace, the peak of which may or 
may not be in the center of the base 
of the resonance curve. The adjust- 
ment of the series oscillator padder 
should then be made so that that res- 
onance curve has the greatest height 
regardless of the position of this peak 
with respect to the center or middle 
of the base line of the trace. This is 
highly important and even though it 
may be necessary to change the re- 
ceiver tuning slightly, the procedure 
is to adjust the trimmer for the great- 
est peak amplitude. An off-center 
peak indicates that the calibration of 
the receiver is incorrect at 600 kc. 
If the oscillator trimmer is adjusted 
so that the peak is in the center of 
the trace when the receiver and signal 
generator are set to 600 kc, then the 
sensitivity and selectivity of the re- 
ceiver are sacrificed for the sake of an 



improvement in the calibration of the 
receiver. This most certainly is the 
undesired condition. 

Fig. 1 shows the incorrect adjust- 
ment which results when the peak is 
centered. Note the low amplitude. 
Fig. 2 shows the improvement in re- 
sponse when the series oscillator pad- 
der was adjusted for maximum 
height, in spite of the fact that the 
peak is not in the center of the trace. 
To bring the peak back to the center 
of the trace, the receiver tuning can 
be changed and the amount by which 
it must be changed to bring it back 
to the center, indicates how far off 
the receiver calibration is at that set- 
ting. As an example, Fig. 3 was ob- 
tained by changing the receiver tun- 
ing from 600 kc. to 595 kc, thus 
establishing that the receiver calibra- 
tion at 600 kc. is off by 5 kc. 

The optimum adjustment is ob- 
tained when the r-f. and detector 
stages are tuned to the input signal 
and the receiver oscillator frequency 
is higher than the signal frequency 
by the numerical value of the inter- 
mediate frequency. In this case, the 
r-f. and detector stages are tuned to 
600 kc, and the receiver oscillator 
frequency is tuned to 860 kc. There 
is no rocking of the tuning condenser 
during alignment. 

Double image system 

The procedure to be followed when 
the double image system is used re- 
quires further explanation. In gen- 
eral, proper alignment is assumed 



j J 



FIG. I 



FIG- 2. 



FIG. 5 




The cathode-ray oscillograph provides a means of seeing the alignment of the 
receiver. The oscillograms shown illustrate alignment of the oscillator at 600 kc. 



34 



Radio Today 



when the two traces coincide. How- 
ever, when working from 600 kc, a 
double trace will appear on the 
screen. The important point is this : 
In contrast to the usual procedure, 
wherein the trimmer adjustments are 
made, so as to bring the two curves 
to a coincidence; in this case the 
series oscillator padder is adjusted 
maximum amplitude of the peaks, re- 
gardless of whether this may or may 
not bring the two curves together. 
Fig. 4 illustrates the incorrect adjust- 
ment made by bringing the two 
curves into coincidence. !Note the 
amplitude. The improvement in sen- 
sitivity, when the series .oscillator 
padder is adjusted so that the peak 
height of the curves is a maximum, 
is shown in Fig. 5. 2vfote that while 
the curves no longer coincide, at the 
same time the gain and selectivity of 
the receiver have been appreciably in- 
creased. The curves can be brought 
into coincidence by retuning the re- 
ceiver. Again, the measure of the 
discrepancy of the dial calibration is 
the amount by which it is necessary 
to change the receiver tuning in 
bringing the two curves together. The 
appearance of the trace when the 
curves are brought together by chang- 
ing the receiver tuning is shown in 
Fig. 6. 



Collecting Small Claims 

* There has been a sud- 
den interest in the matter of possible 
methods of collecting small amounts 
of money which are due service men 
for work done. This subject is of 
sufficient importance to justify its ap- 
pearance in every radio magazine 
published in America which circu- 
lates among radio men. 

Small establishments of various 
kinds at different times find 
themselves in the position where they 
have no redress against customers 
who do not pay small sums they owe 
for servicing. Usually, these sums, 
ranging from $5.00 to $10.00 or even 
$25.00, do not justify normal proc- 
esses of collection through agencies 
or lawyers, because of the amount of 
money it is necessary to spend in 
effecting collection. Consequently, 
the best course is to charge off the 
amount as a loss. 

It might be well if service men 
made an effort to find out if their 
town has what is known in New York 
City as a "Small Claims Court." It 
is likely that such a hall of judgment 
is found in other towns and perhaps 
known by another name. Some towns 
and cities maintain what may be 



"HOW TO CHOOSE A RADIO SET 
FOR XMAS" 

Feature broadcast on WABC and the 
entire Columbia network, by Dr. 
Orestes Caldwell, Editor of 
"Radio Today," Thurs., Dec. 19, 
5:45 p.m., E.S.T. 

* Further help in the sell- 
ing of quality receivers will be ex- 
tended by Radio Today in a special 
broadcast Thursday when Editor Cald- 
well goes on the air again at the invi- 
tation of the Columbia Broadcasting 
System. Feature will have a Yuletide 
note and will include new tips on the 
ultimate in radio reception. 



classified as being a "public de- 
fender," in other words, a lawyer 
maintained by the city to present the 
case of those people who cannot af- 
ford to spend the money required for 
legal prosecution of small amounts. 

In small claims courts of the type 
existing in New York City, the plain- 
tiff presents his case and it is not nec- 
essary that he have a lawyer to do so. 
The referee or judge sitting on the 
bench determines the merits of the 
case and rthe decision rendered is 
final. 



SOUND 
PROJECTION 

at its best! 

WITH THE NEW, SCIENTIFICALLY DESIGNED 

LIFETIME 

SOUND PROJECTION BAFFLES 

Today's advances in sound reproduction are made possible by 
this new development, resulting in more effective sound distribu- 
tion and a minimum of feed back. .- — -. 

Model No. 32 has a 32" bell — will take any fM % 

12" speaker and comes complete with * m m — _ 
weatherproof speaker housing and adjust- |w^ r % ; 

able mounting bracket. List §3S.50. 

Special Introductory Price to P.A. 
Men $16.95 -;> 

Prepaid on receipt of remittance. \ ./ 

P. A. AND SOUND EQUIPMENT MEN! 

Do you want to increase the value of every dollar that you spend 
for equipment? The LIFETIME CORP. offers a radically new 
proposition to a limited number of energetic P.A. men. Send for 
particulars on your own letterhead. 

LIFETIME CORP. 

1006 MADISON AVE. TOLEDO, OHIO 

MANUFACTURERS: Carbon, condenser, crystal, electrostatic 
and velocity microphones — electro dynamic speakers, aluminum 
trumpets and sound projectors. 

Send for descriptive literature. 



■ 


CattdoHm 

ARMOUR^ji ■ 

wire wr«lff Wry A 


■ 




^Jm [rOVER ELEVEN 
M.MF MILLION INi 

W&W^ use A 




■ 


n>Pr2uoTE? 

cgyfEif) 

THE MUTER COMPANY 

1255 SO. MICHIGAN AVENUE 
CHICAGO 


■ 



> 

z 

> 

TO 

O 
m 

o 

c 
£ 

m 

Z 
—i 

^ 

—i 

> 



December, 1935 



35 



NEW 

readrite 

ALL-WAVE 

SIGNAL 
GENERATOR 




VjUuL-btCoiJk 



s 14- 4 ° 



Five Plugr-in Coi!s cover 
5 frequency bands from 
100 to 20,000 Kc. All fre- 
quencies fundamentals 
and stabilised. Complete 
with batteries and two 
\o. 30 tubes. 
Dealer Wet 
Price Only- 
Model 554-A. The new Readrite All- 
Wave Signal Generator includes all im- 
provements of present-day engineering. 
The use of plug-in- coils permits any 
new frequency band to be added by a 
new coil. Extra wide scale permits ac- 
curate frequency settings from the 
large calibration curves supplied. 
Besides having all frequencies funda- 
mentals, this new Signal Generator is 
complete shielded and tube modulated. 
Model 554-A. Complete with batteries, 
two No. 30 tubes and installed in 
leatherette covered portable case with 
removable cover. 



Dealer Net 
Price 



14 



JO 



SEE YOUR JOBBER 

Readrite manufactures all types o. r 
testers used for servicing Radio Sets, 
including Set Testers. Tube Testers, Re- 
sistance, Continuity and Capacity Test- 
ers, Point-to-Point Testers and inex- 
pensive Indicating Meters. 



'itidutt 



TESTERS AND METERS 



This Coupon Bring* Fuels 

' READRITE METER WORKS 

I 12-10 College Drive I 

J Bluft'ton, Ohio I 

Please send me full information on I 
| Model 554-A Readrite All-Wave Sig- . 

| nal Generator I 

| Catalogue 

I Name I 

I Address ■ 

I I 

City State I 



SERVICE NOTES-JOHN RIDER 



A. S. C. 

* A. S. C. is not a Fed- 
eral bureau. ... It means automatic 
sensitivity control, one of the very 
latest developments in radio receiver 
design, although not yet in receivers. 
What is said here is hased upon a 
paper delivered by G. L. Beers and 
which appeared in the December, 1935, 
issue of The Proceedings of the In- 
stitute of Radio Engineers. With 
A. S. C, A. V. 0., Q. A. V. C. there 
is plenty studying to be done by the 
servicing industry. The basic circuit 
of this automatic sensitivity control 
system is shown below. As is evident, 
a triode is used and its plate impe- 
dance, that is, the impedance existing 
between the plate and the cathode of 
the tube, is in shunt with the tuned 
circuit and acts as a variable load 
upon this tuned circuit. By varying 
the control voltage applied to the grid, 
the plate impedance of the triode is 
changed over a range of from 10.000 
ohms to 1 megohm. As the negative 
grid bias is increased, the plate im- 
pedance becomes higher and the. load 
upon the tuned circuit is lowered. The 
effect of this variable load is to in- 
crease or decrease the selectivity fac- 
tor of the complete circuit. The 
greater the load, the lower the degree 
of selectivity available with the sys- 
tem. 

Normally a load across a tuned cir- 
cuit will not only vary the selectivity 
response of the circuit, but will also 
vary the amplitude of the signal volt- 



age developed across the circuit. 
However, by arranging for automat- 
ically controlled bias voltage, in other 
words A. V. C. upon the amplifier 
tube, a combination of increased sen- 
sitivity and increased selectivity is 
secured when weak signals are being 
received. On the other hand, when a 
strong signal is received, such as 
would enable proper reception of all 
of the modulation frequencies which 
constitute the side bands, the com- 
bination of automatic sensitivity and 
automatic selectivity controls act in 
such manner as to keep the amplitude 
of the signal at the proper level, yet 
broaden the frequency response of the 
circuit, so that the side bands are 
properly passed through the system. 

The r-f. amplifier tube shown on 
the schematic is coupled in the tuned 
circuit through the blocking con- 
denser. The grid leak is used as a 
path for the a-v-c voltage. A similar 
application of automatic selectivity 
conti'ol is to vary the degree of selec- 
tivity of intermediate-frequency am- 
plifiers, whereby it is made possible to 
shift automatically the response of 
such a system from what would be the 
equivalent of a high-fidelity adjust- 
ment to what represents normal selec- 
tivity. 

R.M.A. color codes 

* The R.M.A. color codes 
tabulated on the following page will 
be extremely helpful in servicing 
these receivers which follow the sug- 
gested code. 



A.S.C 




RF- 
\AMP. 






A-S-C- 
B + CONTROL 
VOLTAGE 



RFAMP. 
CONTROL 
VOLTAGE 



Automatic selectivity control as applied to the antenna stage of a receiver. The 
plate impedance of the triode varies the selectivity. 



36 



Radio Today 



RADIO MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION 




COLOR CODES 


The following information should be on file in every radio service 


shop as being the color codes as recommended by the R.M.A. 




Speaker output transformers 


GREEN - 
BROWN - 
RED 


-outside lead of primary winding 
-inside lead of primary winding 
—primary center tap if one is used 


WHITE - 
MARO ON- 


—outside lead of secondary winding 
—inside lead of secondary winding 




Speaker field coils 


YELLOW - 
BLACK 
GRAY - 


— outside lead of winding 
— inside lead of winding 
—center tap if one is used 


If two 
YELLOW - 
BLACK 


separate fields are employed 
—outside lead of winding No. 1 
— inside lead of winding No. 1 


GRAY - 
BLUE 


—outside lead of winding No. 2 
—inside lead of winding No. 2 




Voice coils 


WHITE - 
MAROON- 

These color 
speaker t 


— outside lead of winding 
—inside lead of winding 
codings correspond with codes of 
ransformer secondary winding. 




Power transformers 


BLACK 


— primary leads 


BLACK — common of tapped primary 
BLACK & YELLOW 50/50 stripes— tap of primary 
BLACK & RED 50/50 stripes— finish of primary 


RED — plate leads of hi voltage secondary 
RED & YELLOW 50/50 stripes— hi voltage center tap 


YELLOW — rectifier filament leads 
YELLOW & BLUE 50/50 stripes— rectifier center tap 


GREEN — filament winding No. 1 

GREEN & YELLOW 50/50 stripes— No. 1 filament center tap 


BROWN —filament winding No. 2 

BROWN & YELLOW 50/50 stripes— No. 2 filament center tap 


SLATE —filament winding No. 3 

SLATE & YELLOW 50/50 stripes— No. 3 filament center tap 




Intermediate-frequency coils 


BLUE 
RED 


— plate lead 
— B+ lead 


GREEN 
BLACK 


— grid (or diode) lead 
— grid return 


With full-wave transformer 
GREEN —diode lead 
GREEN-BLACK —diode lead 
BLACK — center tap (diode return) 




RESISTORS 

THE STANDARD OF QUALITY 
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD 




. . . a COMPLETE 
LINE for EVERY 
RADIO NEED 



Type "B" Insulated 
Metallized 

Combining: all the well known 
desirable features of the famous 
Metallized principle PLUS com- 
plete insulation. 

Type "F" Metallized 

For many years the best known 
quality radio resistor. 

Power Wire Wound 

Fixed and adjustable types for 
every heavy duty application. 

Precision Wire Wound 

Unexcelled for use wherever 
great accuracy is essential. 

Suppressors 

Five handy types for eliminating 
noise on all auto radio installa- 
tions. 

Volume Controls 

l*ofl 4'iii iometers & Tone 

Controls 

Specialized units for radio manu- 
facturers and the export trade. 

INTERNATIONAL 
RESISTANCE COMPANY 

I'll 1 1. A It* I. I'll I A. FA. 

Factories or Licensees in 

Toronto — London — Copenhagen — 

Milan — Paris — Berlin 



December, 1935 



37 



Cafiacitote 




WET 

DRY 

PAPER 

MICA 

TRIMMER 



■\.M 



WHEN IN NEED OF 
GOOD CONDENSERS- 
SPECIFY THE BEST 

Literature on n 

SOLAR MFG. CORP. 

599-601 Broadway 
New York City 



PROBLEM 



APPLY - 



To find a reliable 
source for all your 
radio supplies which 
will bring you the highest grade of 
merchandise at the lowest prices — 
which will offer you a vast selection 
to fill every Radio Service need — 
which will give you quick "stream- 
lined" service and smart handling on 
each order — and which, besides, will 
work with you on your problems, 
right at your shoulder, in a friendly, 
helpful way. 

"lALLIED's 19 3 6 
Catalog — the leading 
Radio Supply Guide. 
A real index to radio progress — 
brimming over with fine standard 
merchandise lines at lowest prices — 
sparkling with new test equipment de- 
velopments, new P. A. systems, new 
metal tube radios — rich with fine se- 
lections of tools and thousands of 
high grade parts — everything to save 
you money and help you succeed. 

Save time — save 
money — get any part, 
any brand, any time 
you want it — at the lowest prices — and enjoy 
ALLIED's speedy, helpful personal service be- 
sides. Keep an ALLIED Catalog by your side 
— it pays. 

SEND FOR YOTTR FREE COPY 



ALLIED RADIO 



RESULTS: 



@ 



833 W. TACKSON BLVD., 

CHICAGO, ILL. DEPT. TR. ! 

Send me your FREE 1936 Cat- ■ 

alog — the most complete Radio | 

Supply Guide ever published. ■ 



Name 



City. 



SALES STIMULATORS 

Leading manufacturers present 
valuable promotion material 



NEW TRANSMITTER GUIDE 

• Thordarson Electric Mfg. 
Co., Chicago, 111., lias just issued a 
32-page low-down on transmitters, 
elaborately illustrated and complete 
with tables and charts. With one ex- 
ception, points out the company, the 
circuits shown have not been previ- 
ously published. 

Booklet includes a section on bias 
methods for r-f amplifiers, and a num- 
ber of new high gain speech amplifiers 
are shown. Parts lists this time in- 
clude "specifications on all parts essen- 
tial for best operation." The price 
is 15c. 



TUBE TESTING PROGRESS 

+ Dealers who are inter- 
ested in the design and development 
of test instruments, or who use such 
apparatus in their service shops, will 
welcome the publication of the book- 
let "The Evolution of Tube Testing." 
Supreme Instruments Corp., Green- 
wood, Miss., makers of radio test 
gadgets, has published the 16-page 
affair, which is gratis to dealers. 

Booklet covers the laboratory de- 
velopment of a commercially OK test 
instrument, and is complete with dia- 
grams and technical data. Material 
of this character is rarely published. 

STRICTLY NEW CATALOGUE 

+ Just off the press, re- 
vised and up-to-the-minute, is a new 
catalogue of condensers and resistors 
by Aerovox Corp., 70 Washington St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Volume presents a 
complete assortment of exact dupli- 
cate replacement condensers for stand- 
ard sets, wire-wound vitreous-enamel 
resistors, and a new type carbon re- 
sistor. 



YAREETY IN SPE- 
CIALLY STYLED 
FLYTURES 

* Specific 
styling of radio display 
fixtures, so that sets 
may be effectively dis- 
played in various back- 
grounds in depart- 
ment stores particu- 
larly, has been deftly 
accomplished by Inter- 
tional Radio Corp. of 
Ann Arbor, Mich., 
makers of Kadette sets. 
Designed with taste 
and discernment, the 
fixtures are adaptable 
to gift shops and drug 
or jewelry stores, as 
well as sundry sections 
in department stores. 



GRAPHIC PLUG 
FOR LINE FILTERS 

+ Special window display 
featuring a dramatic caption, "Elimi- 
nates Noise!" is being offered by J. W. 




Miller Co., Los Angeles, with their $4 
line filter. . Exhibit is a catchy card- 
board affair dramatizing noiseless re- 
ception, appropriately elementary 
rather than technical in its appeal. 



L. THOMAS GOES SHORT-WAVE 

* Lowell Thomas, famed 
commentator and man-about-the-world, 
has written a radio travelogue which 
makes foreign broadcasts more inti- 
mately interesting, and includes the 
low-down on broadcast schedules 
abroad. Volume has been published 
by Crosley for distribution through 
the company's dealers. 

Mr. Thomas gives pleasant and 
useful suggestions on how to dial dis- 
tant stations, where to look for police, 
weather, aviation, amateur, and ship 
broadcasts in addition to the Ameri- 
can and foreign features. The World's 
leading stations are listed, and time 
variations are clarified on a map. 




38 



Radio Today 



Headquarters for Quality 
Radio Sets at Low Prices 




Model FE-68, 6 Tube Super- 
heterodyne — AC -DC — 2, Band 
Short Wave and Broadcast Re- 
ceiver — large four color dial- 
tone control. 

An outstanding new radio set 
with exceptionally fine tone 
quality — in hand polished, wal- 
nut cabinet — built for quality 
markets. 

PRIVATE BRAND SETS 

A complete line including low priced 
TRF sets for sales and promotional pur- 
poses to fill the need for low priced 
leaders to round out a complete line. 
Licensed under RCA and Hazeltine 
patents. 

Write for prices and full information on 
the complete new FREED-EISEMANN 
sets. 

FREED MANUFACTURING CO., Inc. 

44 W. 18th ST. NEW YORK, N. Y. 




Not only Volume VI 
but all the 

RIDER MANUALS 

are in hourly use by 
servicemen all over 
the world. . . . There 
is only one reason 

RIDER MANUALS 

are the best 

JOHN F. RIDER 

Publisher 
1440 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 



...USED BY 
THOUSANDS 



WHOLESALERS 



* Louis Buehn Co., Philadelphia, 
veteran Atwater Kent distributor, have 
announced their retirement from busi- 
ness, and AK has issued notice that 
the Rumsey Electric Co., 1007 Arch St., 
will be the company's distribution 
headquarters in Philadelphia and sur- 
rounding- area beginning next month. 

* F. B. Connelly Co.. Seattle, have 
made three important appointments'. 
Frank T. Parker as the new credit 
manager of the Connelly branch at 
Portland, Oregon; S. W. Leach as new 
credit manager of the Seattle branch, 
and Frank Porter as purchasing agent 
at Seattle. Entire Connelly Co. sales 
organization recently had a two-day 
general convention at Seattle, with 14 
manufacturers exhibiting. 

■k New and exclusive distributor of 
Fairbanks-Morse radios, refrigerators, 
and home laundry equipment is the 
Sam Home Co., Knoxville, Tenn. Home 
Co. plans to service the territory from 
offices at Knoxville and Bristol, Tenn., 
and Middleboro, Ky. 

•k Troy Radio Manufacturing Co. 
has announced Henry Wolff, of the 
Henry Wolff Co., 154 Eighth St., San 
Francisco, as the exclusive representa- 
tive for Troy in northern California. 

•k Dale Radio Co. and Dale Parts 

Inc., New York City, have issued 
a list of recently appointed dealers: 
Standard Radio Service, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Robert Steiger, Lawrence, Long 
Island, N. Y., and New Deal Radio 
Shop, Passaic, N. J. 

New products added to the Dale Co. 
lines are Eveready batteries, Webster 
amplifiers, and Knapp-Monarch appli- 
ances. 

■*■ K. Mclnnis, southeastern district 
sales manager for Fairbanks-Morse 
Home Appliances, Inc., has issued no- 
tice that the General Auto Supply Co., 
Tampa, Florida, is now distributor of 
the company's radios, refrigerators, 
and ironers. Appointment of Railey- 
Milain, Inc., Miami, Fla., as exclusive 
distributor in southern Florida was 
also announced by Fairbanks-Morse. 

-k Fada Radio and Electric Co., 

Long Island City, N. Y., has OK'd the 
appointment of the Kronson Radio and 

Parts Co., Buffalo, as exclusive distrib- 
utor of Western New York for both 
household and auto receivers. Kron- 
son Co. has branches in Niagara Falls 
and Rochester. Ernest Kronson heads 
the main office at Buffalo and W. C. 
Moore is manager of the Rochester 
branch. 

Fada has also announced a new dis- 
tributor for the Trenton, N. J., area, 
the Warren Balderston Co., of which 
Harry Stover is president and R. L. 
Hutchinson manager of the electrical 
department. 

jic From Zenith Radio France, 

Paris, exclusive distributors for Zenith 
in France and her colonies, came the 
report late last month that since Mon- 
sieur Aries and Monsieur Audibert 
have again taken over the agency, the 
firm has noted a substantial improve- 
ment in business. Report described the 
new models as "impeccable." 

■*• Carl Hartman, of the C. L Hart- 
man Corp., Rochester, N. Y., died sud- 
denly on Nov. 30. Hartman Co. distrib- 
utes Atwater Kent radios. 

ir Greer & Co., 223 Canal St., Staple- 
ton, Staten Island, N. Y., who were re- 
cently appointed Ken-Rad jobbers, re- 
port the signing of a large number of 
dealer accounts throughout their terri- 
tory for Ken-Rad tubes. "Doc" Greer 
and Al Motz are personally visiting the 
dealers and service men all along the 
road, believing that these are the days 
when personal cooperation brings busi- 
ness. 

■*• The Sparks-Withington Co. is 
sponsoring the thirty-sixth gathering 
of Sparton -jobbers on January 7th and 
Sth at the Hayes Hotel, Jackson. The 
1936 line of Sparton refrigerators will 
be shown together with several new 
radio models. 




The Only Speaker 

with Armored 

Field Coils 



UAM 

SPEAKERS 




Only skilled oper- 
ators, experienced 
in delicate electri- 
cal assembly, build 
the precise voice 
coil units of Quam 
Speakers. 




QUAM-NICHOLS CO. 



IERICA-S LARGEST SPEAKER MANUFACTUR 




ONLY 
QUALITY 

CAN 
ENDURE 



ONLY DEPENDABLE CONDENSERS 
can continue to shine permanently in en- 
gineering favor. Some products, like fall- 
ing stars, attract the attention of buyers for 
a moment— then fade into obscurity. Spec- 
tacular — but lacking in enduring quality. 
CORNELL-DUBILIER capacitors have 
been the choice of broadcasting en- 
gineers since the inception of radio trans- 
mission. 

The genius of William Dubilier and a staff 
of great engineers ... a plant second to 
none in size or facilities . . . an army of 
skilled workers . . . these are the factors 
which guarantee that C~D condensers will 
continue to shine permanently in your favor. 

26 Years of experience behind every condenser. 

Catalog 127 available upon request. 



CORNELL-DUBILIER 

CORPORATION 

4360 BRONX BOULEVARD 
NEW YORK 



December, 1935 



39 






The Money-Saving 



OXE SOLKCE OF SUPPLY 



Dealing with Aerovox means one 
source of supply for those con- 
densers and resistors . . . one 
order, one shipment, one book- 
keeping entry, one check in 
payment. You save time, pa- 
tience, routine, and money. 

• <o.M)i:.\si:iis • 

Most varied line available today. 
Every type . . . paper, electrolytic, 
mica, transmitting . . . every 
voltage and capacity and 
mounting . . . engineered for 
quality and service . . . mass 
produced for lowest prices. 

• RESISTORS • 

Pyrohm wire-wound vitreous 
enameled resistors for heavy 
duty; Slideohms for adjustable 
resistance values; new Carbon 
Resistors; and other types. 

DATA New 1936 Catal °g, 

covering entire line, 
sent on request. Meanwhile, see 
your local AEROVOX JOBBER. 
He's worth knowing! 



EFCOvm 



CORPORATION 

85 Washington St. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



JUadia VjCtots 

SftetUdists£ 

Supplying 
20,000 
Servicemen 
with Every- 
thing in 

RADIO 

THE New Radolek 1936 Profit Guide 
is NEW! BIGGER! BETTER! 
The most complete Radio Parts Catalog 
ever published — it's colossal — gigantic 
— it's the "top"! Never has there been 
a Radio Parts Catalog comparable to 
this superb book. Every page brings 
you extra profits. Completely revised — 
right up to the minute, bringing you 
everything in radio — at the right prices. 
Over 160 pages of valuable, money - 
saving "radio - buying" information. 
Over 10,000 separate Repair Parts- 
hundreds of new items — a complete, 
new selection of Radio Receivers and 
Amplifiers. Contains the most com- 
plete, exact duplicate, replacement parts list- 
ings, of volume controls, condensers, transform- 
ers, vibrators ever compiled. This is your book 
—it's FREE. Send for IT! 
RADOLEK restricts distribution of the PROFIT 
GUIDE to those actively and commercially en- 
gaged in the Radio Business. Please enclose 
your Business Card or Letter Head. 
MAIL THIS COUPON 




THE RADOLEK COMPANY 

o«S W. Randolph St.. Chicago. 111. 



NAME ... 
ADDRESS 



you a serviceman ? n Dealer □ Exp'm n 



TRADE NEWS 



* Parker H. Ericksen, 

for the past three years advertising 
manager of Zenith Radio Corp., Chi- 
cago, has been advanced to the po- 
sition of sales promotion manager 
and will devote his time to the an- 
alysis ..nd solution of sales problems 
of distributors' territories. Zenith 
also announces apointment of Edgar 
C. Herrmann as advertising man- 
ager. Hermann has had 16 years' 
ad and merchandising experience 
with the Federal Advertising Agency 
of New York, Victor Talking Ma- 
chine Co., and RCA Victor. 

•k Lee McCanne, secre- 
tary of the Stromberg-Carlson Tele- 
phone Mfg. Co., Rochester, N. Y., 
made a visit to Chicago early this 
month to work on the company's 
early 1936 plans. Kenneth Gillespie, 
sales manager of Stromberg's Kan- 
sas City branch, and several impor- 
tant dealers in the area were in on 
the conferences. 

* Move to augment the 
personnel of the exec staff of Echo- 
phone Radio Corp., Chicago, has re- 
sulted in the appointment of Doug- 
las C. Smith as vice-president in 
charge of sales, and Joseph Webber 
as chief engineer, according to the 
announcement of Clem F. Wade, 
Echophone president. Smith has had 
extended radio experience with 
Wanamaker's stores, and Webber 
has emerged from the U. S. air ser- 
vice and four years in the engineer- 
ing dept. at the University of Illinois. 

+ Orders from abroad 
for Majestic radio or refrigerator 
parts are being handled by Harry J. 
Scheel, 330 South Wells St., Chi- 
cago. 

•k Fada Radio and 
Electric Co. has appointed W. R. Mc- 
Allister as direct sales manager cov- 
ering the territory of upper New 
York State, Pennsylvania, Ohio, 
West Virginia, Delaware, Maryland, 
and the District of Columbia. Mc- 
Allister, who has been busy in radio 
since the beginning of broadcasting, 
rejoins the Fada organization after 
an absence of 16 months. 

* W. W. Cone, until 

recently a special New York repre- 
sentative of the RCA Radiotron di- 
vision, has a new position as aide to 
Thomas F. Joyce, sales promotion 
and advertising manager of RCA 
Manufacturing Co. 

k H. Ij. Boar, eastern 
district manager for Fairbanks- 
Morse Home Appliances, Inc., re- 
ports a strong gain in radio sales, 
mainly in higher priced models. 
Company 3rd Dimensional Tone fea- 
ture fits the popular interest in high 
fidelity. 

Witkop & Holmes, who now han- 
dle Fairbanks-Morse radios in Buf- 
falo exclusively, have reported good 
results from a big tie-in with a local 
movie house. 



GENUINE 



Radio & Refrigerator 
Parts 

A Complete Stock Now 
Available at the F 'act or y 

. . . Send for our new Genuine 
Majestic Radio Parts Catalog. 
Also our New Exchange Price 
Schedule on Majestic Refrigera- 
tor Units and Parts. 

Write Today 

FRANK M. McKEY, Trustee 

GRIGSBY-GRUNOW CO. 

5801 Dickens Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 



Export orders will be handled 
through 

HARRY J. SCHEEL 
330 South Wells St. 

Cable Address: Harscheel Chicago 



SPEAKER 
CONES 

TODAY'S TOMORROW'S 
TREND IS DEMAND 

TOWARD: WILL BE FOR: 

Quality Products 

In the MULTIPLEX line you have the 
ultimate in speaker cone replacements. 

MULTIPLEX cones are better be- 
cause, they are of better design, they 
have better diaphragms, they fit exactly, 
they have reinforced voice coils and 
many other features found only in the 
MULTIPLEX line. 

MULTIPLEX products bear this 




— your guarantee of quality. 

Write for information and the name 
of your local representative. 

MULTIPLEX 
RADIO SERVICE, Inc. 

88 4th AVE., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Cable Address: "SARUM" NEWYORK 



40 



Radio Today 



* Hart Lehman, ad 
agency, has been appointed by Pierce 
Airo, Inc., to handle its account. 
Pierce Airo makes De Wald radios. 

* Harry J. S c h e e 1, 

widely known abroad as former ex- 
port manager for the Grigsby- 
Grunow Corp., is now associated 
in the same capacity with the Case 
Electric Corp., with factories at 
Marion, Ind., and export offices at 
330 S. Wells St., Chicago. 

* Open house is the 
order of the day at the new home of 
Ford, Browne & Mathews, well- 
known Chicago advertising agency, 
handling the advertising of many 
radio manufacturing organizations. 
In its new quarters at 100 East Ohio 
Street, Chicago, the agency has 
greatly increased facilities. Some of 
the color schemes introduced in 
these new offices would do justice to 
the most ardent disciples of futur- 
istic art. 

* H. A. Hutchins, for 
many years a radio-tube executive 
and now connected with the West- 
ern Advertising Agency in Chicago, 
is responsible for a unique idea in 
the shape of a composite house or- 
gan, which is being issued monthly 
for his various clients in the radio 
industry. The house organ is mailed 
monthly and, according to Mr. 
Hutchins, was conceived with the 
idea of coordinating the sales, ad- 
vertising and sales promotion divi- 
sions of the various manufacturing 
organizations. Among the com- 
panies whose activities are set forth 
are National Union Radio Corp., 
New York, N. Y.; Triplett Electrical 
Instrument Company, Bluff ton, Ohio; 
Halldorson Company, Chicago, and 
the Girard-Continental Corp., Chi- 
cago. 




PRODUCTS CO., 361 W. SUPERIOR ST., CHICAGO 

200 BROADWAY, SEW YORK, N. i. 




"STANDARD" 
6 volt to 550 volt 



m£i^\JOA\^&C^ "BLUE RIBBON" 

Condensers 



630 



IN ANY STYLE, SIZE OR CAPACITY 

FOR RADIO FILTER, AUDIO BY PASS, TRANSMITTING 
AND MOTOR STARTING 

EVERY CONDENSER GUARANTEED TO GIVE SATISFACTION 



CURTIS CONDENSER CORPORATION 



CLEVELAND. OHIO 





AR THAT 
OXFORD/ 



w 



Y~^LEAR as a belli Every note true, distinct 
V-^ — from high soprano to treble bass. Such 
a Speaker makes radio more enjoyable. Plenty 
of volume, too, for Public Address. No dis- 
tortion. . . . Oxford CHROMAVOX Speakers 
— scientifically designed, care- 
fully manufactured and thoroughly tested (every one) — can be depended on 
to give true reproduction under all conditions. A wide line, moderately 
priced. Investigate! See your jobber or write us for Bulletin 351-K. 




In old Algiers, R.A. Picard, the ad 
agency exec. He's just back from a 
globe -circler on which he very 
seriously eyed conditions in the for- 
eign radio market. 

December, 1935 



OXFORD-TARTAK RADIO CORP. 

150 W. Huron St. Chicago. Illinois 



YOUR OBSOLETE 
ANALYZER MODERNIZED 

INTO A TWO METER MASTER 
ROTARY SELECTIVE SYSTEM 

UIDITC CAD AIID Dl All mention model number 

niiiic run uun rum \of your old analyzer 

PRECISION APPARATUS CORP. 

Modernization Division — Dept. T 
821 EAST NEW YORK AVE. BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 



41 



NEW THINGS FROM THE MANUFACTURERS 



MODERNIZATION CHASSIS 

+ All-wave speaker and 
chassis outfits for modernizing that 
old cabinet. Numerous models using 
from 6 to 10 tubes available — some 
with metal tubes. Incorporates fea- 
tures found in regular Crosley models. 
Attractive panel furnished with each 
chassis. List prices from $34.20 to 
$84.70. Crosley Radio Corp., Cincin- 
nati, Ohio — Radio Today 



HI IMPEDANCE VELOCITY MIKES 




* High impedance velocity 
microphones for direct coupling to 
grid of amplifier tubes — increases gain 
and reduces hum. Models with imped- 
ances of 100,000 or 5,000 ohms avail- 
able. High fidelity — flat response 
within one decibel from 50 to 12,000 
cycles. Permanent magnet type em- 
ploying field pieces of Nicalum high- 
permeability alloy. Bruno Labora- 
tories, 22 W. 22nd St., New York City 
— Radio Today 



REPLACEMENT CONES 
AND FIELD COLLS 

* Complete line of replace- 
ment field coils and speaker cones for 
Majestic receivers. Conform with 
maufacturer's specifications, electri- 
cally and physically. Multiplex Radio 
Service, Inc., 88 Fourth Ave., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. — Radio Today 



ATTRACTIVE TUBE TESTER 




* Tube analyzer with free 
point analysis — possibility, of obsoles- 
cence eliminated — accommodates over 
300 types. Line voltage checked on 
meter — instrument fused. Provides 
hot inter-electrode short and cathode 
leakage tests — each portion of multi- 
section tubes checked separated. Tubes 
tested under load — condition indi- 
cated on direct reading scale. Avail- 



able in portable, panel, or counter 
types. Electronometer Model 500 — 
net $39.50. Precision Apparatus Corp., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. — Radio Today 

ANTENNA ELIMINATOR 




Kadi 

to Set Anf. J" 

* Substitute designed for 
use where conventional antenna is im- 
practical. Used as test aerial by serv- 
icemen and demonstrators. Operates 
down to 80 meters. Signals diverted 
from power line to receiver by choke 
and condenser arrangement. Used 
with good ground connection and de- 
pends only upon the signals picked up 
by power line. Continental Carbon, 
Inc., 13900 Lorain Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio — Radio Today 



ALLOY-CORE LP. 
TRANSFORMERS 




* High-gain intermediate 
frequency transformer using Crolite, 
a magnesium alloy core imbedded in 
ceramic body. Mica compression tun- 
ing condensers — aluminum shield can 
1% in. square by 3% in. Single-stage 
amplifier with these transformers has 
gain equal to two-stage air-core type 
and with lower noise level. Available 
in standard frequencies. List $2. 
J. W. Miller Co., 5917 South Main St., 
Los Angeles, Calif. — Radio Today 



SOUND TRUCK OUTFIT 

* Combination amplifier 
for sound truck with radio, dual-speed 
turntable, and microphone. Power out- 
put of 7 watts feeds two 8-inch dy- 
namic speakers. Superheterodyne re- 
ceiver with AVC. Entire outfit 
powered by 6-volt battery. Pick-up 
arm operates successfully while under 
way, even over rough pavements. Size 
— 17%xl8y 8 in. xl5% in. high. Model 
PG-79. RCA Mfg. Co., Camden, N. J.— 
Radio Today 



MOULDED RESISTORS 

•At Non-inductive carbon re- 
sistors of the moulded type — noiseless, 
permanent, and unaffected by humidity 
changes. Slight positive temperature 



coefficient compensates minimum volt- 
age coefficient and protects against 
heavy short-period overloads. Pig- 
tails soldered to resistor element. 
Available in 1/3, %, 1 watt sizes — 
100 to 10,000,000 ohms. Aerovox Corp., 
70 Washington St., Brooklyn, N. Y. — 
Radio Today 



AUTOMATIC PHONO- 
COMBINATION 




■* Automatic phonograph 
combination and 8-tube radio — covers 
140-410 and 540-19,500 kc. Features 
slide-rule tuning scale and sentry box 
with permaliners. Record reproduc- 
tion handled through audio system — 
record changer accommodates nine 10- 
inch or eight 12-inch records — inter- 
mission of 4% seconds between rec- 
ords. Power output of 8.1 watts — 8 
metal tubes. Model A-88. General 
Electric Co., Bridgeport, Conn. — Radio 
Today 



METAL TUBE LINE 




* Arcturus Radio Tube 
Company, Newark, N. J., announces 
its "Coronet" metal-tube line, utilizing 
a new and exclusive principle in re- 
ceiving-tube structure. It is claimed 
that the "Coronet" seal in these tubes 
enables the application of manufactur- 
ing technique perfected over past 28 
years. 

This special construction also re- 
sults in material reduction of input 
and output capacities and makes pos- 
sible uniformity in inter-element ca- 
pacities. Special process has been de- 
veloped to permit proper bombard- 
ment of the inner elements to the 
temperature necessary to dispense 



42 



Radio Today 



with residual-gas troubles. New seal 
precludes possibility of shorts between 
wires and ground. 

Manufacturer also claims more de- 
pendable vacuum; lower operating 
temperatures permitting closer ar- 
rangement of chassis components; 
rugged structure eliminating metallic 
sleighbells and resulting in quiet op- 
eration. Types already in production 
are 5Z4, 6A8, 6C5, 6F5, 6F6, 6H6, 6J7, 
6K7, and 6L7 — Radio Today 

CO-AXIAL, TRANSMISSION LINE 

•k Untuned concentric 
transmission line for broadcast and 
ultra-high frequency transmitters — 
nitrogen filled for dependable per- 
formance. Weather-proof line may be 
buried or bent as desired — shipped in 
coils. Available in sizes for powers 
up to 50 kw. with terminating equip- 
ment — single lengths up to 500 feet. 
Doolittle & Falknor, Inc., 1306 W. 
74th St., Chicago, 111.— Radio Today 

TUNED S-W ANTENNA 




■*• A tuned antenna for the 
short-wave fan. Doublet 49% feet 
long with 134-foot twisted-pair trans- 
mission line terminating in tuning 
box. It is claimed that four- to five- 
fold increase in volume is obtained 
over ordinary all-wave antennas, with 
equal gain in noise elimination. Non- 
critical in operation and easy to tune. 
List $14.75. McMurdo Silver Corp., 
3354 N. Paulin St., Chicago, 111 — 
Radio Today 

CLOCK DIAL RECEIVER 




* Line of all -wave re- 
ceivers using 8-inch tuning dial with 
phantom illumination for ease of tun- 
ing and calibration-dual ratio vernier. 
Table and console models with six to 
ten tubes — combination of metal and 



glass. Superhet circuit with variable 
selectivity — automatic volume control 
and bass compensator. Modernistic 
streamline cabinets. "Tell-Time" re- 
ceivers — list $47.50 to $119.50. Case 
Electric Corporation, 1307 S. Michigan 
Ave., Chicago, 111. — Radio Today 



MODERNISTIC METER 




* DS meter of D'Arsonval 
type with unusually long scale 
(4% in.) — jewelled pivots. Semi-flush 
type mounting — bakelite case. Accu- 
racy within 2 per cent — made in all 
popular current and voltage ranges. 
Mounts through 2% in. diameter hole. 
Hoyt type 573 — 10 milliampere move- 
ment — list $8.50. Burton-Rogers Co., 
755 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. — 
Radio Today 



UNIVERSAL TESTER 




■* AC-DC multi-meter de- 
signed for radio servicing — provides 
for measurement of AC-DC voltages 
and resistances, DC currents, and in- 
ductance and capacitance. Founda- 
tion of outfit is DC meter with rec- 
tifier. Range of meter controlled by 
rotary selector switch. Will test 
electrolytic condensers for capacitance 
and leakage. Model 611 Tester — list 
$50.00. Shallcross Mfg. Co., 700 Mac- 
Dade Blvd., Collingdale, Pa. — Radio 
Today 



RESISTOR TUBE 

* Resistor for dropping 
line voltage in AC-DC receivers — en- 
closed in perforated metal housing fit- 
ting in octal socket. Offers low op- 
erating temperatures, excellent insula- 
tion between element and ground, 
keeps "live" leads under chassis with 
resistor above. Will take care of tubes 
and pilot lights. Satisfies Under- 
writer's requirements. Clarostat Mfg. 
Co., 285 N. Sixth St., Brooklyn, N. Y.— 
Radio Today 



6X5 25A6, 25Z6 TUBES 

• Metal tubes for auto and 
AC-DC receivers. Type 6X5 is recti- 
fier for auto use — will handle greater 
power than type 84. Types 25A6 and 
25Z6 are similar to glass types 43 and 
25Z5 respectively. The three types 
employ octal bases. Raytheon Pro- 
duction Corp., 30 E. 42nd St., New 
York City- — Radio Today 

PERMANENT iMAGNET 
DYNAMIC SPEAKER 

* Line of permanent mag- 
net speakers employing a newly dis- 
covered alloy in the magnetic struc- 
ture — equal to energized type used in 
AC receivers. More compact than pre- 
vious types and lower in cost. Avail- 
able in 6, 8, 10, and 12-inch sizes. Jen- 
sen Radio Mfg. Co., 6601 S. Laramie 
Ave., Chicago, 111. — Radio Today 

AUTOMATIC CHLMES 




* Automatic chimes for 
broadcast stations have been developed 
by Rangertone, Inc., Newark, N. J., 
utilizing the oscillations of vacuum- 
tube circuits, thus producing definite, 
dependable volume and sequence. These 
chimes are heard regularly over NBC 
networks. Available in various series 
and can be applied in numerous ways. 
— Radio Today. 

12-TUBE SUPER 




* Metal-tube superhetero- 
dyne with 12 tubes featuring cathode- 
ray tuning indicator. Four band tun- 
ing with selective dial lighting — bass 
accentuator and static reducing con- 
trol. Triode power detection and au- 
tomatic volume control. Designed for 
export and tropic use as well as do- 
mestic. Pilot Radio Corp., 37-06 36th St., 
Long Island City, N. Y. — Radio Today 



December, 1935 



43 



j\: 



■^ka£1 



*d\° 






RA.01OS 






»^° H CHICAGO 



Ou t s tan ding 
EXCELLENCE 
in RECORDING 

TN the largest broadcast stations . . . 
■*- in professional and private record- 
ing .. . RANGERTONE recording 
equipment and records have brought a 
new and higher standard of excellence. 

Two quality-characteristics have led to 
its use or adoption in the most exact- 
ing studios: 1 — extreme fidelity; 
2 — elimination of surface noise. 

With RANGERTONE superiority in 
recording and reproducing . . . with 
10 decibels less surface noise . . . 
fidelity is no longer a mere trade term; 
it is a scientific fact. The reproduction 
is indistinguishable from the original. 

RANGERTONE efficiency lies not 
only in high quality, but in the cor- 
rect engineering balance between all co- 
working units and parts — especially 
Rangertone Cutting Needles which are 
hand-lapped Stellite designed to cut 
Rangertone Records made of purest ma- 
terials in an air-conditioned atmosphere. 

fMS T GERTONE,lNC. 
Electric -Music 

201 VERONA AVE., NEWARK, N. J. 



SELLING RECORDS 

Dealers string along with show producers 



* Currently important on 
the list of movie and musical produc- 
tions whose vogue gives the record 
dealer some special opportunities for 
sales promotion are: 

Sunny 

Top Hat 

Collegiate 

Porgy and Bess 

Two for Tonight 

We're in the Money 

Stars Over Broadway 

Here Comes the Band 

Broadway Melody of 1936 

George White's Scandals of 1936 

A Night at the Opera 

I Dream Too Much 

Here's to Romance 

On With the Show 

To Beat the Band 

Sweet Surrender 

In Person 

Coronado 

Jubilee 

Live-wire and aggressive retailers 
find a tie-up with motion pictures 
of distinct help in building rec- 
ord sales. They follow carefully the 
scheduled dates for the presentation 
of the different pictures and use win- 
dow streamers, window displays, 
mailing lists and other sales-promo- 
tion ideas to sell records of the fea- 
tured hits in the motion pictures play- 
ing in their neighborhood theaters. 

The progress made by the record 
industry in the past year or so is 




Reisman of Brunswick's top ork. 



fittingly illustrated in the attitude 
shown by one of the foremost motion 
picture producers recently. Hereto- 
fore, the motion-picture producers 
have placed motion pictures on the 
screen with the idea in mind that 
the picture would help to sell records 
and sheet music. With the intro- 
ducing of the Fred Astaire picture, 
"Top Hat," this policy was reversed 
and the records were placed on sale 
several weeks before the premiere of 
the picture, the producer believing 
that the music would help exploit the 
picture. 

Ads on programs 

* With the beginning of 
the concert and opera seasons, plenty 
of dealers are buying ad space on 
programs. A prominent jobber re- 
minded Radio Today of several suc- 
cessful stunts of this type, where new 
records were adroitly listed on pro- 
gram booklets and the fall values in 
recorded music got across to the right 
prospects. 

Best sellers as ive go to press 

BRUNSWICK 

I Got Plenty o' Nuttln' — Pox trot. It 
Ain't Necessarily So — Fox trot. (Both 
from "Porgy and Bess") VC by Edward 
Matthews, with Leo Reisman and his 
Orchestra — 7562. 

One Night in Monte Carlo — Fox trot. 
VC by Elmer Feldkamp. A Little Bit 
Independent (But Easy on the Eyes) — 
Fox trot. VC by trio. Both with 
Freddy Martin and his Orchestra — 7559 

If You Were Mine — Fox trot. Eeny 
Meeny, Miney, Mo — Fox trot. (Both 
from RKO picture, "To Beat the Band"). 
Both with VC by Billie Holiday with 
Teddy Wilson and his Orchestra — 7554. 

DECCA 

Red Sails in the Sunset — Fox trot. Ma- 
donna Mia — Fox trot. Vocal by Car- 
men Lombardo, with Guy Lombardo 
and Orchestra — 585. 

I'm in the Mood for Love — Fox trot. 
Got a Bran' New Suit — Fox trot. VC 
by Louis Armstrong. Both by Louis 
Armstrong and Orchestra — 579. 

Cheek to Cheek — Fox trot. Top Hat. 

White Tie and Tails — Fox trot. (Both 
from "Top Hat") with Boswell Sisters 
vocal trio and Orchestra — 574. 

VICTOR 

Take Me Back to My Boots and Sadd'c 
— Fox trot. On Treasure Island — Fo\ 

trot. Both bv Tommy Dorsey and his 
Orchestra — 25144. 

Red Sails in the Sunset — Fox trot. 
Turn Your Face to the Sun — Fox trot. 
Both by Jack Jackson and his Or- 
chestra — 25152. 

Georgia Rockin' Chair — Fox trot. 
Brother Seek and Ye Shall Find — Fox 

trot. Both by "Fats" Waller and his 
Orchestra — 2517 5. 



44 



Radio Today 



- — 




A/(/A/Cr 7\AD/0 




The combination of the best brains of the radio engineers and the artistry of the designers 

has placed the 1936 PHILCO at the top of the radio industry. 

Perfect reception from near or far — the doings of the whole world are yours by the turn of the new PHILCO precision dial. 

Model illustrated: Philco 116X— High Fidelity— 15 watts undistorted output— 11 tubes— A. C— 13.4 to 2000 meters. 

PHILCO RADIO AND TELEVISION CORP. 
Export Department 

AMERICAN STEEL EXPORT COMPANY 

347 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK, N. V., U. S. A. 



NEW 1936 PHILCO 

PRECISION RADIO 

DIAL 




SHADOW TUNING 

1. Daytime Foreign 

2. Night time Foreign 

3. Police, Aircraft, Amateur 

4. Standard Broadcast 

Five wave bands covering 
every broadcast service. 




Jmeep this ringing all through 
1936 with Atwater Kent 



ATWATER KENT MANUFACTURING COMPANY • A. Ativater Kent, Pres. - PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



25< 





$1 Yearly 



General Business 

— recovery holds at 97% 

— prospects good thruout 1 936 

— retail buying up, all lines 

— January activity strong 

Radio Trade 

— receiver sales reach all-time record 
of 5,700,000 for '35 

— tubes 73,000,000 for year 

— many new January lines appear 

Broadcasting 

— air-time $86,000,000,- 
525,000,000 for talent 
political broadcasts under way 




Automobile Radio 

— 1935 closes with 1,200,000 sold 

— automotive industry rush carrying 
car-radio to new highs in '36 

— rumored Ford will make radio 
standard car equipment 

Trade-ins 

— dealers report 80-90% of sales 
involve handling old sets 

— trade-in problem more acute 

— Radio Today launching campaign 
to give old sets to shut-ins 

Public-Address 

— local political meetings open new 
sales opportunities 

— moderate-priced equipment now 
available 

Phonograph "Combinations" 

— 31 makers now offer units 

— finance plans available to trade 

— dealers hold women's club recitals 



• JANUARY • 1936 • 



MAGIC KEY BUILDS 
PROGRAM WITH TALENT 

DRAWN FROM ALL 
AROUND THE WORLD 





There's been a lot of talk about a man on 
a horse. Well, he seems to have arrived, 
and bless us, if it isn't Paul Whiteman. 
No, he didn't wear his horse to the NBC 
studio for his Magic Key appearance — 
but you should see him at Jumbo. 




From feeble little station ETA at Addis 
Ababa, RCA Communications picked up 
Ed Beattie, put his talk on the RCA Magic 
Key program. 




HOW HIGH IS A MOUSE WHEN IT 
SPINS? Right smart high in world popu- 
larity when it can keep up the dizzy pace 
of Mickey Mouse. Walt Disney, Mickey 
and a gang of their pals turned up on an 
RCA Magic Key broadcast. Went over big. 



Magic Key of RCA takes place among 

NBC programs that are building demand 

for new, up-to-the-minute sets 

THE better the entertainment offered on the air, the big- 
ger the interest in new radio sets. And this year NBC 
programs are at a new high in all 'round interest. Every day 
and every evening the NBC Networks present show after 
shovv that holds the interest of millions. 

The Magic Key of RCA is one of the more recent comers. 
Starting last October this show has attained nation-wide fol- 
lowing. And it has attained it on Sunday afternoon, when the 
whole family listens. 

This Magic Key program put right up to NBC the job of 
organizing a program to sell the goods and services of all its 
associated companies. Because of RCA's position the pro- 
gram had to have dignity. But it also had to sell. So the dignity 
was achieved on the basis of doing everything well. Thus 
RCA proved itself no cobbler with barefoot children. It 
wrought well at its own trade, and for its own offspring. 

Sell today's great National Broadcasting Company shows 
to your prospects, and you will sell more radio sets. 



NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 

A SUBSIDIARY OF RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA • NEW YORK • CHICAGO • WASHINGTON • SAN FRANCI 




Bullseye 1936 Sales Now with these 3 Hot Shots!' 



'Emerson 



'RE-CREATES THE ARTIST 





Radio 



IN YOUR HOME" 



Freshen up your stock — lead off with these winners — 
three of the livest, easiest-to-merchandise sets on the 
market — priced to sell in all territories — with ap- 
pearance and performance which make them in all 
ways sensational. 

All other Emerson models — up to $129.95 — are 
scheduled for the biggest records in history during 
1936! 



EMERSON 
Model 108 



EMERSON . Model 116 

With Tone Control and Aeroplane Dial 

NEW — 5-tube AC Superheterodyne with 
Tone Control — Aeroplane Dial — Two Bands: 
95 to 200 Meters and 196 to 555 Meters — 
Standard American Broadcast and American 
Short Wave including both Police Bands, 
Amateur and Aeroplane Stations — 3 Watts 
Output — Emerson "Micro-Selector" and 
other features — in a handsome Walnut 
Cabinet, I4'/j in. high — with RCA tubes. 
List Price, 




5-tube AC-DC Super- 
heterodyne — Aeroplane 
Dial — Automatic Volume 
Control — Dustproof Dy- 
namic Speaker — Two 
Bands: 75 to 200 Meters 
and 193 to 565 Meters — 
Standard American Broad- 
cast and American Short 
Wave, including both Police 
Bands, Amateur and Aero- 
plane Stations — Baltelite 
Cabinet, II in. high — RCA 
tubes. List price, 

$0^ 95 



24 



$ 



24 



95 



Get Emerson's 1936 
Proposition NOW 

Write or wire your nearest Emerson dis- 
tributor — or send direct for details of 
discounts, promotion, etc., during Emerson's 
biggest year ever! 



EMERSON Model 109 

4-tube AC-DC Superheterodyne — Cov- 
ering American Broadcasts, Police and 
Amateur Stations — Illuminated Aero- 
plane Dial — Dustproof Dynamic Speaker 
— Balcelite Cabinet — ol /t in. wide — 
RCA tubes. List Price, 



$ 



17 



95 




EMERSON RADIO & PHONOGRAPH CORPORATION, I I I Eighth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
The EMERSON Line Also Comprises Models for Every Foreign Market. Cable Address: EMPHONOCO, N. Y. 



Radio Today, published monthly by Caldwell-Clements, Inc., 480 Lexington Avenue, New York City. 
Subscriptions yearly, $1 in U.S.; $2 in Canada and foreign countries. Copyright 1936 by Caldwell-Clements, Inc. 




and cuqaLkL. in 




• * * \Qt/L 

PHILCO 



*f Q*J p was a bis year for Philco dealers . . . 
■ 7 «J +J a year in which they made great strides 
forward . . . built up prestige . . . made more profit 
than ever before. 

And now for another year ... a year that 
promises even more to Philco dealers than the one 
that has just closed! Philco has kept a watchful eye 
on sales opportunities . . . has figured out just what 
you need to boost 1936 sales to still greater 
heights . . . and NOW Philco announces many new 
additions to the 1936 line! These additions will 
give you the same jump on competition in 1936 
that Philco has always given you in the past. 

The new models are ready now! And in every 
American and Foreign Philco, you have the great- 
est sales weapon of the day . . . the exclusive 



built 



in 



AERIAL-TUNING 
SYSTEM 

From all sides . . . from dealers everywhere . . . 
letters pour in telling of the tremendous success 
of this great Philco invention as a sales-builder! 
Here is a "feature" that only Philco dealers can 
offer ... a feature that registers with the public 
for it doubles the number of foreign stations you 
can get and enjoy. It's a feature that means SALES 
for YOU! 

You can make January a record month. January 
is the time to pile up those points for the great 
Philco Havana Cruise . . . points that will make you 
one of the 2481 guests on the luxurious "Monarch 
of Bermuda," with all expenses paid! 

Get full details of the new additions to the Philco 
line . . . and of the Philco Cruise to Havana . . . 
from your distributor! 



PHILCO RADIO & TELEVISION CORPORATION 



Radio Today 



^ JA ^ 22 M 

^ClB 288128 % 



Staff— 

Darrell Bartee 
Franklin S. Irby 
Randall R. Irwin 
G. H. Mayorga 
M. H. Newton 
John F. Rider 
B. V. Spinetta 
Vinton K. Ulrich 



Lee Robinson 

Sales Manager 



RADIO 
TODAY 



Orestes H. Caldwell 
Editor 



M. Clements 
Publisher 



/ 480 Lexington Ave. 
New York City 
Tel. PLaza 3-1340 

/ 

Vol. II, No. 1 



BRIGHT 1936 



* Signs for general busi- 
ness in 1936 seem good. As year 
opens the business index stands at 
between 96 and 97 per cent — com- 
pared with 83 per cent a year ago. 

General business activity will un- 
doubtedly continue at least at pres- 
ent levels throughout the year, and 
may even go higher, although the 
prospects of a Presidential election 
usually have the effect of slowing 
down business. 

Experienced observers, however, de- 
clare they see no signs of business 
let-up in 1936. On the contrary in- 
tense small-house building is ex- 
pected, with benefits all along the 
line. 



DURING 1936, RADIO WILL 
ELECT NEXT PRESIDENT 

• With 1936 an election 
year, and the political pot already 
bubbling, radio has had handed to it 
the greatest drawing card on earth — 
a full-blast Presidential campaign. 

For radio — not the newspapers — 
will elect the next President. Popu- 
lar interest, high and low, city and 
country, will be centered upon the 
present contest. The sessions of Con- 
gress, the party conventions, the cam- 
paigns, and finally the election itself, 
will provide a continuing spectacle 
for radio listeners, and one which 
should sell sets. 

So radio sales should hold their 
own during 193-6. And despite the 
enormous production totals of the 
year just closed, radio sets will be in 
more demand than ever. 

So while radio production for 1936 
may not run far ahead of 1935, it 
will be substantially based and sound, 
and should repeat the glowing record 
of 5.700,000 sets. 



BROADCAST BILLINGS 

* Networks have added 
up their revenues for 1935 and are 
still beaming over the totals. From 
NBC : "Ours is $31,148,931, which is 
11.9 per cent over 1934, not including 
talent expenditures." From CBS : 
"Ours is $17,637,804, which is 19 
per cent over 1934, and the largest in 
our history." 

For the year, 1935, Columbia's 
totals and the estimates of NBC rev- 
enue, by networks, line up as follows : 

NBC Bed $18,722,715 

CBS 17,637,804 

NBC Blue 11,659,499 

Figure issued by the Mutual Broad- 
casting System was for the last 6 
months of 1935, a total of $697,821. 

Total time sales on all stations in 
the U. S for 1935 adds up to about 
$86,000,000, compared with $72,- 
887,000 in 1934. Where this upthrust 
will bring the totals in 1936 to a 
figure which is likely to mark radio 
as a financial miracle, since the presi- 



dential campaign and the sponsor's 
preference for celebrities will drive 
the expenditures sharply upward. 



5,700,000 SETS SOLD IN 1935 

* Beports compiled by 
Badio Today indicate that radio-set 
production for the fourth quarter of 
1935, although slowed up by retail set- 
backs, nevertheless exceeded third- 
quarter production' Particular fea- 
tures were theybig output of October 
and the end-of-year rise of automo- 
bile-radio production. 

Estimating fourth-quarter produc- 
tion at 1,700,000 sets, and combining 
this with the license totals for other 
quarters and with unlicensed sets, the 
figures are given below, dollar vol- 
umes being retail values of sets with 
tubes. 

1935 Units Retail Value 

1st quarter 1,155,438 $69,000,000 

2nd quarter 1,074,909 64,000,000 

3rd quarter 1,521,684 91,000,000 

4th quarter (est.) 1,700,000 101,000,000 



Total licensed... 5,450,000 $325,000,000 
Unlicensed 250,000 11,000,000 



Total sets 



5,700,000 $336,000,000 




January, 1936 



ie 




.. ..Ki * 




" 










s 

n ■ 




X) 


m 




* . j 



NEW NBC PREXY 



David Sarnoff, president RCA, shows Major Lohr, new prexy NBC, how to 
operate the controls of a big network. 



* Honored newcomer to 
the prexy's office at NBC is Lenox R. 
Lohr, succeeding Merlin H. Ayles- 
worth, who asked to be relieved of 
the chief's duties because he has 
enough to do with the chairmanship 
of RKO. 

Among other things, Major Lohr 
has emerged from Cornell and Cam- 
bridge Universities, the World War, 
and the general- managership of 
Chicago's Century of Progress. Seven 
years he was a member of the board 
of directors, executive secretary and 
editor of the Journal of the Society 
of American Military Engineers. 

Smart journalist, distinguished en- 
gineer, seasoned showman. Major 
Lohr has already had first hand-shake 
with FCC moguls at Washington. 



REALLOCATION OFF 
TILL AFTER ELECTION 

* Lor the past two or 
three months radio circles in Wash- 
ington have been agog with reports of 
plans for a complete re-allocation of 
broadcast facilities, station power, 
clear channels, and new applications. 
Broadcasters have been lying awake 
nights worrying over their future as- 
signments if the mysterious re-alloca- 
tion plan, concocted in FCC engineer- 
ing offices, went through without 
notice. 

But now all these headaches are 
postponed for the time being, and it 
is certain that there will be no sta- 
tion shift between now and November. 

The White House was courteously 
reminded that broadcasting is in 1936 
the most powerful electioneering me- 
dium, far out-distancing the press, 
that "Radio will elect the next Presi- 
dent." So there will be no mussing up 
of the ether channels between now 
and Nov. 4. But after election, look 
out for a big shake-up. 



DOZEN STATIONS 
FLIRTING WITH 500 KW 

* Success of 500 kw. 
transmitter power on WLW, Cincin- 
nati, has aroused the interest of other 
leading broadcasters, and many are 
eager to follow Crosley into the super- 
power realm. 

Recent cheek-up showed that there 
are at least ten or a dozen stations 



which are now considering applica- 
tions for 500 kw. or thereabouts and 
have discussed possibilities with man- 
ufacturers. 

Meanwhile it is rumored that if 
other broadcasters barge into the 500 
kw. class, Powel Crosley will apply 
for still greater power, perhaps 1,000 
kw. — "a million watts." At any rate 
it is a matter of record that the Cros- 
ley station has long led the power 
procession, back from the days when 
it pioneered 50 watts and 500 watts, 
then considered gigantic by other 
broadcasters. 




Walter Holland, who retires as Philco 
vice-president, to ranch in Arizona. 



DISPLAY ON WHEELS 

* From Chicago, Fair- 
banks-Morse has forwarded to Radio 
Today a novel account of how several 
distributors get results with the use 
of trucks and trailers in contacting 
dealers and dealer prospects with mer- 
chandise models for sales demonstra- 
tion work. 

These traveling displays roll up to 
the dealer's front door with a work- 
ing supply of radios, refrigerators, 
washers, and ironers, and create a 
mild sensation with a well-planned 
show-off of the models. It drama- 
tizes the efforts of the salesmen and 
cuts the contact costs for the dis- 
tributors. 

Fairbanks-Morse distributors now 
using the device are Appliances, Inc., 
Cincinnati ; True and Blanchard Co., 
Newport, Vt. ; Charles E. Turnock 
Co., Milwaukee, and Fairbanks- 
Morse & Co., St. Louis. 



BIG RETAIL BUSINESSES 

* Signify what it may, 
the dizzy amounts spent by consum- 
ers in 1935, considered by groups, 
ranged from one billion to seven, 
with radio's figure set at $400,500,000. 
Total retail biz in the United States 
for the year is estimated at $32,000,- 
000,000; last year the figure was 
$28,548,000,000. 

Estimated line-up for 1935 is : 
Food group, $7,560,000,000; auto- 
motive group (includes gas and oil), 
$6,800,000,000 ; apparel group, 
$2,405,000,000; furniture and house- 
hold group, $1,472,000,000 ; drug 
group, $1,267,000,000. 



Radio Today 



"RADIO WILL ELECT THE 
NEXT PRESIDENT" 

* An observer who is 
making a tour throughout the nation 
studying economic and political con- 
ditions, makes the following signifi- 
cant report to his principals : 

"If one does any great amount of 
talking with 'dirt-farmers' and the 
public generally, about the political 
outlook, he will soon find that the in- 
fluence of the newspapers and their 
editorials is a very much over-rated 
factor in the present-day world. 

"The fact is that radio has run 
away with the show in influencing 
the politics of the public — and from 
the writer's travels he finds it five-to- 
one in effectiveness. And the group 
he finds still least conscious of this 
change, is the newspaper publishers 
themselves. They are still living in 
the world of yesterday." 

TELEVISION-CABLE ROW 

* After the American 
Telephone and Telegraph Company 
had been granted authority by the 
Federal Communications Commission 
to lay the much-discussed coaxial 
cable between New York City and 
Philadelphia, the company asked for 
a rehearing because the grant stipu- 
lated that the cable must be made 
available to others for experimental 
purposes in television. 

A. T. & T. moved to have testimony 
of commercial uses of the cable ruled 
out of the affair, but the FCC said 
thumbs down, and is hearing evidence 
on that very angle. 

CARLOADS FOR RADIO 

* Radio is now big busi- 
ness and has gotten to the point where 
its raw materials come in thousand- 
carload lots. 

During 1935 the entire radio in- 
dustry is estimated to have con- 
sumed a million miles of wire — 
enough to reach four times to the 
moon. Some 1,500 carloads of steel 
were consumed for receiver chassis 
and parts. And 3,500 carloads of 
lumber went into cabinets. 

The radio-set industry collected 
roundly $307,000,000 from the Ameri- 
can public for receivers and tubes — 
exclusive of set operating costs, serv- 
icing repairs, and broadcasting. Thus 
the set-and-tube business alone sup- 
ported some 350,000 people, both di- 
rect employees and those occupied in 
the supply of constituents and raw 
materials. 




Howard Briggs of Howard Radio, 

with Burton Browne, of F B & M, 

Chicago, — old timers. 



EXCISE TAX SHOWS 1935 
RADIO 25% AHEAD 

* The official govern- 
ment report of Federal excise taxes 
collected on sales of radio sets for the 
first eleven months of 1935 indicates 
that 1935 sales of the radio industry 
will be about 25 per cent ahead of 
1934. 

During November, the U. S. Rev- 
enue Bureau reports, the 5 per cent 



radio and phonograph excise tax col- 
lections were $571,479.61, an increase 
of 23.5 per cent over the collections of 
$462,638.47 during November 1934. 
This does not include excise taxes on 
automobile radio which are not sep- 
arately reported but are included 
among automobile accessories taxable 
at 2 per cent. 

The radio excise tax collections for 
eleven months ending November 
1935, totaled $3,706,420.65, an in- 
crease of 25.5 per cent over the simi- 
lar excise tax collections of $2,952,- 
737.48 for the similar eleven months' 
period of 1934. 

SERVICE EXPENSE, 46% 

+ Statistics indicate that 
radio service men operating rec- 
ognized servicing establishments or 
stores all over the United States oper- 
ate at an expense as high as 46 per 
cent of total income. 

Recognizing that the salary of the 
owner, which is a part of this expense, 
is on the average less than $1,000 a 
year, the low prevailing service 
charges and the definitely limited 
prices which may be charged for re- 
placement parts when sold, these ex- 
pense figures are extremely high. 
They are very much higher than the 
ratio found in profitably operated 
maintenance sale organizations. Since 
a man can work only a definite num- 
ber of hours each day, that is, if he 
is to live like a human being, the only 
means of rectifying the situation is 
to raise service charges. 

Proper financial planning and oper- 
ation calls for an expense not greater 
than about 30 per cent of the total 
income, assuming at least $1,500 a 
year salary for the operator. 



WHAT WAS SPENT FOR RADIO IN 1935 



5,700,000 radio sets, with tubes 

39,000,000 tube replacements 

Electricity and batteries to operate 25,500,000 
home sets 

Repairs and servicing, of sets (minus replacement- 
tube sales) 

Broadcasting time sold 

Broadcast talent costs 



1935 Total 



$336,000,000 



31.000,000 



154,000,000 



68,000,000 

86,000,000 

25,000,000 

$700,000,000 



Compiled by Ilndlo Today 



January, 1936 




Scramble among amateur photographers for camera angles of the principals in 

NBC's Eno Crime Clues program. In the unusual contest, Miss Paula Morse of 

New York City was named winner last month. 



DEEPER BLUE 

* Major move by NBC 
to give Pacific Coast listeners a finer 
program service was the opening of 
a second coast-to-coast net, an ex- 
pensive 1936 gesture which will carry 
to the west coast the same programs 
heard on the Basic Blue Network 
headed by Station WJZ. Extension 
of the Blue Web thus offers coast 
fans the whole works on both NBC 
chains. 

Five stations in the West joined 
NBC to complete the hook-up, and 
along with KFSD these are to be 




"Doug" Smith, recently named as 

Echophone's vice-president in charge 

of sales, located at Chicago. 



known as the Pacific Coast Blue Net- 
work. Newcomer stations, which are 
EGO, EECA, EEX, KJK, and EGA, 
hook up with the rest of the Blue 
stations at Omaha. 

NBC thus belts the northern sec- 
tion of the nation with two trans- 
continental webs; the term "coast- to- 
eoast"' has a new meaning for 
sponsors who want a national recep- 
tion for their artists. 

TELEVISION TESTS USE MOVIE FILM 

* Motion pictures will 
come to the aid of television at the 
outset, for the proposal now is that 
recent-run feature films will be put 
on the air, for the enjoyment of tele- 
vision "lookers-in." These part fea- 
tures can be supplemented with 
trailer "pre-views" of current movie 
offerings, and also news reels. In 
this way, television instead of sap- 
ping movie-attendance, will be made 
to supplement it. 

Programs offer another difficulty, 
for when the actors are to be both 
seen and heard, production problems 
are enormously complicated. 

These are but a few of the prob- 
lems which television faces before the 
present laboratory developments, ad- 
vanced as they are, can be put to 
commercial application. 

As radio dealers, jobbers and ser- 
vice men read and hear about the 
coming experiments in television 
transmission at New York, they 
should be prepared to explain to their 
customers that these are only local 
experiments which will have no sig- 
nificance for many months so far as 



television service for the country is 
concerned. 

Eadio receiver sales can therefore 
be carried on undisturbed, despite the 
local New York experiments. 

OLD RADIOS GIVEN TO INVALIDS; 
SOLUTION FOR TRADE-INS 

*■ With old radio sets 
presenting increasing obstacles to the 
sale of modern sets into millions of 
homes well able to afford quality radio 
reception, Eadio Today is launching 
a nation-wide campaign to get such 
old sets given away by their owners 
to local deserving shut-ins and unfor- 
tunates who would not be able to buy 
radios for themselves. 

The undertaking will be carried out 
through local welfare groups entirely 
outside of the radio trade. Volunteer 
and professional charity workers will 
be asked to find deserving recipients 
— invalid, blind, aged — to whom a 
radio set would mean so much. 

Each such transfer of an old radio 
will bring happiness to an individual 
otherwise shut off from radio, besides 
impressing on the well-to-do donor a 
new appreciation of radio-broadcast 
quality with modern sets. 

Each such gift will also create a 
vacuum into which a new high-quality 
set can be immediately sold, so that 
radio dealers will want to work closely 
with local agencies engaged in this 
inspiring effort. 



GRUNOW REORGANIZED, 
GOES AHEAD 

* General Household 
Utilities Company, Chicago, Ed., 
manufacturer of Grunow radio and 
refrigeration products, has completed 
plans during the past thirty days 
which will enable the company to go 
ahead on a definite, sound basis, with 
ample working capital. 

On Dec. 31 W. C. Grunow sent a 
telegram to Grunow distributors that 
briefly summarized the company's 
financial and manufacturing status : 

"Federal Court appointed C. A. 
Albers and me permanent trustees. 
. . . This morning court authorized 
purchase of materials to put wonder- 
ful 1936 line of refrigerators into 
immediate production. ... I believe 
reorganization will be completed in 
near future. You may pass this news 
on to your dealers. Eadio production 
now running in excess of a thousand 
sets per day." 

In a letter mailed the same day to 



Radio Today 



Grunow dealers everywhere, Mr. 
Grunow added : 

"General Household Utilities did 
thirty-two million dollars' worth of 
business in thirty-four months, with 
insufficient capital. That's the situ- 
ation in a nutshell. And it tells con- 
vincingly of the very overwhelming 
value we have built into Grunow 
radios and refrigerators. But lack of 
adequate working capital, for the vol- 
ume we have been doing, made it nee- 




New Grunow exec — Howard J. 
Shartle, sales head of General House- 
hold Utilities Co. 

essary for us to reorganize under 
WB. (77B is in no sense a receiver- 
ship.) 

"On Dec. 24 a plan of reorganiza- 
tion was filed. This plan is so fair 
to creditors and to stockholders that 
the assurance of more than 80 per 
cent of the debt and the consent of 
an overwhelming majority of the 
stock was instantly given (the law 
calls for an assent by only two-thirds 
of the debt and 51 per cent of the 
stock)." 

Grunow distributors and dealers 
were further gratified to learn of the 
appointment of Howard J. Shartle as 
general sales manager of the com- 
pany. Mr. Shartle brings to this im- 
portant position a background of a 
quarter century in executive, sales 
and merchandising positions in the 
radio-music industry. For several 
years he was an important executive 
in the Victor Talking Machine Com- 



pany and over a long period was head 
of the Cleveland Talking Machine 
Company, Cleveland, Ohio, one of the 
most successful distributing organ- 
izations in the country. Mr. Shartle 
is, therefore, familiar with the mar- 
keting of specialty products from 
every conceivable angle. He knows 
the problems of jobber and dealer 
thoroughly and adequately, and is ad- 
mirably qualified to work in close co- 
operation with every factor of the 
Grunow organization. 

During the past few weeks, Mr. 
Shartle has surrounded himself with 
a corps of thoroughly experienced 
and capable merchandisers, including 
Otto Bowman, Jimmy Basmussen, 
Herbert E. Young, James J. Davin 
and IT. D. MacBae. 

Every member of this staff has 
been identified with the merchandis- 
ing of Grunow products for many 
years. Mr. Bowman is assistant sales 
manager; Mr. Basmussen is advertis- 
ing manager ; Mr. Young is Eastern 
manager, with Mr. MacBae as his 
assistant. Mr. Davin is functioning 
as a division manager in Western 
territory. 

RADIO HELPS SAFER DRIVING 

* Simply because it 
seems ghastly and fantastic that mo- 
torists and pedestrians should be 
steadily mangled at an astonishing 
rate on the highways of the country, 
Stewart- Warner has moved to give 
the matter of safe driving the benefit 
of a big-time radio program. Altru- 
istic gesture is similar to Squibb' ■; 
backing the cause of world peace, ex- 
cept that Stewart- Warner carries a 
banner of more immediate concern. 
Activity in the national campaign 
will center around the Alemite divi- 




John Shephard III, president of New 

England's progressive chain, the 

Yankee Network. 

sion of the company, plugged every 
Thursday night on CBS by Horace 
Heidt and his popular entertainers. 

JAPANESE MENACE 

* A new and widespread 
source of radio interference on the 
short waves is reported coming' from 
incandescent electric lamps. Par- 
ticular lamps, exhibiting no visible 
fault, are found to set up Barkhausen 
oscillations at 30 to 60 megac5'cles. 
Such oscillations are found espe- 
cially prevalent in Japanese lamps. 
The oscillations are set up in the 
lamp filament itself, and have noth- 
ing to do with loose sockets or poor 
connections, which are other sources 
of radio interference. 



MORE RADIO HOMES THAN AUTOS 


Homes' with radio sets, Jan. 1, 1936 


' 22,500,000 


Sets in homes with two or more radios 


3,000,000 


Automobile radios in use, Jan. 1, 1936 


3,000,000 


Total radio sets in use, Jan. 1, 1936 


28,500,000 


Total passenger car registrations, Jan. 1936 


22,450,000 


Total homes with automobiles, Jan. 1936 


17,650,000 


Total residence telephones, Jan. 1936 


11,000,000 


Total homes with electricity, Jan. 1936 


21,030,000 


Total homes in United States, Jan. 1936 


31,000,000 


Compiled by Hndlu Todny 





January, 1936 



THERE'S NO SUBSTITUTE FOR SELLING 



-large percentage of replacement sales in 1936 
- quality sets best demonstrated in home 



— present users as prospect list for calls 

— "service inspections" as door-openers 



• "OUTSIDE selling" by radio 
dealers has met with distinct objec- 
tion on the part of many successful 
radio merchandisers, until recent 
months. But surveys conducted bj' 
Radio Today throughout the country, 
show that this method of "going 
after the business" into the custom- 
er's home is now being utilized by an 
increasing numbv of retail radio 
organizations. 

More and more, as radio becomes a 
replacement business, is it found 
necessary to get into the homes of 
existing radio listeners, and show 
them the great improvements in the 
new receivers, to replace their now- 
obsolete equipment. 

Rule of seven 

In any community, divide the 
homes with radios into seven groups. 
Then the first of these groups will be 
found to have radio sets sold during 
1935; the second, sets dated 1934; 
the third, 1933 ; the fourth, 1932 ; the 
fifth, 1931 ; and the sixth and seventh 
will contain outmoded products of 
1930, 1929 and before. 

Thus half of the homes in your 
town — any town — have radios four 
years old or more — radio sets badly 
in need of replacement. These are 
sets with cabinets that have become 
eye-sores, and with reproduction tone 
that is far substandard compared with 
the splendid broadcasting of today. 



Tinny aw fulness 

The loyalty with which a radio 
owner will insist that the tone of his 
old set is the equal of anything on 
the market, has long been the de- 
s p a i r of musically-discriminating 
friends as well as the bane of the 
interested radio dealer. It is only 
by getting a new radio set into such 
a home, connecting it up, and let- 
ting the prospect hear it for himself, 
alongside his own radio, that the 
tinny awfulness of the old reproducer 
becomes evident to the doting owner. 

Demonstration and contrast will 
tell the story. Demonstration will 
"show up" the old set with its lack 
of the low notes which deepen and 
enrich the reproduction, and its fail- 
ure to deliver the sparkling high fre- 
quencies which add life and character 
to music and voice. "Demonstration 
is believing." 

Home demonstrations 

And such demonstration has to be 
done in the home itself. In few 
stores during daylight hours are 
radio reception conditions such as 
permit any adequate demonstration 
of the full reproduction possibilities 
of the new sets. Field-strengths are 
usually weak in business sections, 
among steel buildings, and here also 
electrical interference is at its 
maximum. 




The place to demonstrate and sell 
the 1936 radio set is right in the 
home where the set is to be used. 

Go after present users 

Homes to which radio sets have 
been sold in the past, often make the 
besCpossible prospect lists, say radio 
dealers who are cold to ordinary can- 
vassing. The retailer who sold the 
same householder a set several years 
before, has an excuse to go himself 
or send a man to cheek-up on the 
set's performance. 

If the receiver has become obsolete 
in performance or appearance, it is 
logical to suggest that a modern set 
be sent up to "try out." Here the 
selling psychology is the same as that 
of the autonrobile salesman who al- 
ways tries to get the prospect seated 
behind the steering wheel, and then 
encourages him to "take a little drive." 

Experience shows that once the 
new radio set is in the family's hands 
and the dials are twirled for a night 
or two, sales follow in most cases. 

Digging up prospects 

Newspaper advertising and direct- 
mail campaigns through letters, post- 
cards and booklets, afford another 
way to dig up interested prospects 
and save the salesman the time taken 
to complete cold-turkey calls. 

Telephone calls provide other 
"openers." Often a woman's voice is 
best for making such canvasses. After 
the appointment has been made, the 
salesman can "get through" the home 
portals more easily if he is "expected." 

Some dealers require their outside 
salesmen to keep several radio sets 
always in customers' homes on dem- 
onstration. Point here is to main- 
tain such demonstration sets continu- 
ally in circulation, and make the 
demonstration periods relatively short 
and definite. Successful dealers rec- 
ommend setting a time for the dem- 
onstrator unit to be moved away — ■ 
or a decision to buy reached. Of 
course on request the demonstration 
period is usually extended, but again 
to a definite date, which should be 
rigidly observed. 

In every town and every neighbor- 
hood there are hundreds of radio sets 
that need replacement. The owners 



Radio Today 



THE "RADIO STATES OF AMERICA 



How the map would look 

if area of each state were 

proportional to its number 

of radio homes 



HOMES WITH AND WITHOUT RADIOS 



Listening audience and receiver markets by states, 
as of January 1 , 1 936 Compiled by Radio Today 



STATE 


HOMES WITH 


PERCENTAGE OF 


HOMES WITH- 




RADIOS 


HOMES WITH RADIOS 


OUT RADIOS 


Alabama 


227,500 


37.7 


374,700 


Arizona 


56,100 


50.3 


55,400 


Arkansas 


128,800 


28.8 


317,900 


California 


1 ,474,000 


83.8 


285,400 


Colorado 


195,600 


72.3 


75,200 


Connecticut 


356,000 


88.4 


47,700 


Delaware 


48,000 


79.4 


12,500 


Dist. of Col. 


121,800 


95.6 


5,600 


Florida 


216,500 


53.6 


187,300 


Georgia 


272,200 


41.2 


389,400 


Idaho 


77,800 


71.0 


31,500 


Illinois 


1,728,000 


85.6 


291 ,500 


Indiana 


625,000 


71.8 


244,500 


Iowa 


482,000 


75.5 


155,200 


Kansas 


334,500 


68.5 


1 54,000 


Kentucky 


323,800 


52.3 


294,1 00 


Louisiana 


271 ,000 


53.8 


232,700 


Maine 


1 43,200 


71.3 


57,800 


Maryland 


333,400 


83.8 


64,500 


Massachusetts 


945,000 


89.5 


1 1 2,300 


Michigan 


964,000 


77.5 


278,200 


Minnesota 


463,000 


74.7 


1 56,500 


Mississippi 


119,500 


25.0 


358,900 


Missouri 


679,500 


72.0 


263,800 


Montana 


90,800 


65.9 


47,100 


Nebraska 


256,000 


73.3 


92,700 



STATE 


HOMES WITH 


PERCENTAGE OF 


HOMES WITH- 




RADIOS 


HOMES WITH RADIOS 


OUT RADIOS 


Nevada 


17,170 


63.8 


9,730 


New Hampshire 98,600 


81.8 


21 ,900 


New Jersey 


939,000 


90.7 


93,000 


New Mexico 


45,400 


44.6 


56,200 


New York 


3,035,000 


92.7 


229,700 


No. Carolina 


280,000 


41.6 


393,700 


No. Dakota 


88,000 


60.0 


58,400 


Ohio 


1 ,405,000 


80.0 


347,800 


Oklahoma 


305,300 


51.8 


284,000 


Oregon 


221,100 


80.4 


53,900 


Pennsylvania 


2,009,700 


88.1 


275,400 


Rhode Island 


1 56,000 


90.7 


1 5,900 


So. Carolina 


1 49,500 


40.2 


222,800 


So. Dakota 


108,300 


66.0 


55,700 


Tennessee 


327,800 


52.6 


294,500 


Texas 


768,000 


53.1 


677,900 


Utah 


88,000 


74.4 


30,200 


Vermont 


64,200 


71.2 


26,100 


Virginia 


31 5,900 


59.4 


21 5,800 


Washington 


349,100 


80.4 


85,500 


West Virginia 


250,500 


65.6 


1 37,800 


Wisconsin 


51 2,000 


. 70.0 


220,900 


Wyoming 


35,100 


59.0 


24,400 



22,501,670 8,41 f 630 

Of the 31 million American families, 72.6% have radios. 



of most of these will not eome into 
the store of their own volition. The 
new set merchandise must be taken 
to the customer's home and the con- 
trast between new and old radios 
demonstrated to all the family. 



The radio dealer can't wait in his 
store for this business to come in. 
He must go out. Within walking 
distance of his store are thousands 
of dollars of prospective sales wait- 
ing for his calls. 



TRADE-INS" TODAY 

— manufacturers present more models to lift trade-in burden 

— dealers develop specific uses for old sets kept in homes 

— owners also encouraged to make gifts of outmoded sets 



* SO long as we live and do 
business, some part of the 13,000,000 
allowance-conscious owners of out- 
moded radios will be continually drag- 
ging them in to trade for new models. 

Facts are that the old sets average 
between five and seven years in age, 
and dealers report that as high as 
90 per cent of their sales involve 
some allowance made for them. Prob- 
lem becomes freshly important as the 
public becomes aware of the finer 
reception features of 1936 models and 
begins to wonder what part of the 
$2,000,000 weekly programs is missed 
when heard through an antiquated set. 

Aid from headquarters 

At least two leading makers of sets 
have offered specially priced models 
to help the dealer meet the trade-in 
problem. In these cases the adver- 
tised list price indicates an excep- 
tionally wide margin, so that the 
dealer may offer attractive allow- 
ances and still expect his normal 
profit. Differences in these models as 
compared with the others are usually 
found in the cabinet, rather than in 
the chassis. 



These policies moved some dealers 
to remark : "How we handle trade-ins 
depends almost entirely upon which 
set we are selling. Allowances vary 
with the attitude of individual 
manufacturers." 

Your solution here? 

Picked up from scores of thought- 
ful dealers, some of them plenty grey 
over the problem, are assorted solu- 
tions and possible answers to the 
question, ''What is to become of the 
old sets?" 

Even in the midst of price cutting, 
some dealers insist that dignified re- 
luctance to offer high allowances can 
be used to induce patrons to keep the 
old set. Convinced that the shop of- 
fers a complete and first class brand 
of service of both the old and the 
new, customers will often forget the 
allowance angle. 

Some dealers have offered to re- 
condition the old set, if the patron 
will buy a new. one and find another 
spot in his home for the old one. 
The trick here is for the salesman 
to get the prospect involved in a dis- 
cussion as to how the reconditioning 



WHERE 1935'S RADIO-SET OUTPUT WENT 


Sets exported 


600,000 


Battery sets to farms 


550,000 


Automobile radios 


1,200,000 


Sets to new listeners in wired homes 


1,000,000 


Replacement sets and additional sets in homes pre- 
viously having radio 


2,350,000 


Total 1935 set production 


5,700,000 


Compiled by Ilndlo Today 





vo 



can be done, and what it will mean 
to the household. 

Dealers agree that so far as sell- 
ing value is concerned the big talk- 
ing point is the all-wave feature of 
the new models. Therewith it may 
be pointed out that although the all- 
wave feature is highly desirable for 
the main receiver in the home, the 
foreign angle is not important for a 
receiver in the kitchen or nursery. 

One prominent dealer said flatly 
that he did not take in the old sets; 
he has an elaborate scheme for in- 
spiring charity on the part of the 
owner, and has a good supply of sug- 
gested places where the old receiver 
would be greatly appreciated as a 
gift. Hospitals, orphanages, club 
rooms, social enterprises, and recrea- 
tional centers are on the list. 

Dealers must remember, however, 
that such old receivers are usually 
a large-size console with a good sup- 
ply of old-fashioned legs, and in sug- 
gesting spots whei'e they may remain 
in use, specific help must be given 
as to how to place the old set to the 
best advantage. 

Second hand biz 

Some dealers have made a fair 
profit by reconditioning the old sets 
and pushing them among people who 
cannot afford a better set. Difficulty 
here is that the prospect was at- 
tracted in the first place by publicity 
given the 1936 receiver features, and 
may not be sidetracked to a set which 
has only the features of yesterday. 

It might be kept in mind, though, 
that among people of the lower in- 
come brackets, who do not own a set 
and have never had any experience 
with the 1936 models, an old set, 
properly reconditioned and plugged 
as a good value, may have sufficient 
appeal. 

Experience has proved that it is 
not wise to sell old sets on time, 
which is the procedure in many cases, 
unless it is completely and carefully 
reconditioned. Service responsibility 
for the dealer following such sales 
is likely to remove all chance of profit. 

Air plugging 

Generally agreed, it is, that what- 
ever trade-in policy is adopted by the 
dealer may best be plugged on the 
air in local broadcasts. Allowance 
offers which have already gone on the 
air are the ones which stuck in the 
minds of prospects, according to 
dealer reports. Everyone who hears 
the offer on the air already has a 
set, of course, and the medium seems 
to dramatize the trade-in biz par- 
ticularly well. 

Radio Today 



AUTOMOBILE RADIOS 

— dealers eye trends in auto sales as best guide today 

— hook-ups with car dealers and dept. stores prove smart 

— auto radio promoters win argument on safety in driving 



* AUTO horns, several loud ones, 
are honking at the dealer's door. 

Drivers come from auto dealers, 
department stores, export concerns, 
or just off the street, and they want 
installation and service of 'a sort 
which they had not learned to ex- 
pect before the advent of 1936. 

Automotive manufacturers, who 
pretty well out-promoted everybody 
else in 1935 and emerged with the 
best sales volume since 1929, could 
scarcely have chalked up such rosy 
gains without creating a stir among 
those who sell car radio receivers. 

Dull conclusions to the effect that 
car dealers sell the sets along with 
the cars and that's the end of it, are 
something less than valid at this 
point. There are plenty of car deal- 
ers and department stores who main- 
tain neither the equipment nor the 
servicemen to do the work required 
for car radios. 

New slants 

Change in the date of the auto 
shows inspired a shift in the sales 
curve for autos, and left a promotion 
spot for merchandisers of car radio, 
since the 1936 car receiver models 
were not ready at the time of the 
show. 

Custom-built controls, deftly de- 
signed to match all car models, are 
now receiving their widest publicity, 
although they are not brand new as 
a mechanical feature. Since the up- 
rush in auto sales runs definitely to- 
ward the higher-priced models, many 
dealers are cashing in on the stronger 
demand for rear-seat installations. 

Specialization 

By this time, the public has had 
enough experience with the operation 
of auto receivers to know its relation 
to the car's ignition system. Deal- 
ers have discovered a nifty talking 
point in accenting the fact that it 
requires a highly specialized type of 
service to assure "clear reception with 
maximum motor power." 

M. B. McCullough, who heads the 
MacAdams Equipment Co., Inc., 507 
W. 56th St., New York City, is one 
exec who specializes very seriously 
and will soon open new and improved 



shops. MacAdams' activity is dedi- 
cated directly to the theory that serv- 
icing 1936 car radios requires atten- 
tion that is special and peculiar. 

Beautiful hook-ups 

Emil Krauss, of Krauss Bros., 210 
W. 65th St., New York City, has 
some profitable hook-ups with car 
dealers and department stores ; con- 
tracts for installation and service 
which have boosted his business to 
1929 levels. Mr. Krauss has the ad- 
vantage of being a pioneer who knows 
his way around in the automotive 
business. 

Local applications of this get- 
together policy, among car dealers 
and radio experts, is quite possible 
in cities of all sizes, since in many 
cases the car manufacturers do not 
stipulate to their dealers where or by 
whom the radio installations may be 
made. 

An argument settled 

Safety cranks who have persisted 
in the claim that car listening is a 
menace to safe driving have been 
shouted down and outnumbered. Driv- 
ers testify that listening in tends to 
cut their speed; a lively broadcast is 
refreshing and lessens the fatigue of 
driving; what driver will go to sleep 
in the midst of an interesting- 
program ? 



Reports have it that the proposed 
ordinance prohibiting auto radios in 
St. Louis has died a well deserved 
death in one of the city's committees. 

Driver programs 

It has been found that among busi- 
ness men who drive to and from work, 
the appeal of news reports and mar- 
ket reviews has an enormous appeal. 
Considerable merchandising success 
awaits those who would regard this 
class of drivers as important enough 
to merit extra attention; perhaps the 
day will come when special broad- 
casts will be arranged for this, or 
other professional types of drivers 
whose road habits are known. 

N. Cooper, of the York Automotive 
Dist. Co., 17 W. 60th St., Xew York 
City, remarks that drivers who have 
tried listening to news broadcasts in 
their cars are likely to regard it as 
a necessity rather than a luxury. With 
the nearby perfect reception now 
available to the driver, via the 1936 
sets, Mr. Cooper's point is that a 
new receiver is actually a necessary 
investment. 



BRAVO, IN A WAY 



* A Wisconsin motorist 
has discovered that it's unthinkable, 
his not having a radio in his car. 
The man, Mr. Bibby, was driving un- 
musically along on the way home 
from Madison, when he was hailed by 
a debonaire hitch-hiker, who inquired 
elegantly, ''Have you a radio in your 
car?" 

Mr. Bibby, feeling himself unex- 
pectedly identified with the Middle 
Ages, admitted that he hadn't a radio. 
The hitch-hiker coolly thanked him 
and said he'd wait for another car. 





_ ■ WHERE THE RADIO 


Wpfy. Repairs. 
Hk&-» ^K servicing 1 


^^ DOLLAR GOES 




Electricity ^H 


w/MMj\ 


to operate sets ^H 


Mw////////mzm\ 


22 cents TM 


BL B /,? aclcast 'imema. 

^y//////'''''''//j/vi////Affldy 

^///////V//m/v,,, ////////////»{ . 


_ ■ "He** tubes 1 

— — ____4c. 1 


^K Purchase of new 


radio sets fl| 


^L 48 cen 


J^ 


700 million such ^^B 


^ 


dollars were spent ^^^J 


J^^ 


in 1935 






-RAPio today 



January, 1936 



11 



ACCENT MODERN 







Speed patterns of the 20th century — above is Zenith's 

strikingly styled distributing headquarters at Chicago. 

Below are passengers dialing RCA receiver aboard the 

Union Pacific's radio-equipped streamlined train. 



Above, Hollywood favorites try out the neat and novel Royale 

"Radiobowl," in which the speaker points vertically. Center 

is a new and fast-looking bookshelf model by Philco, and below 

is recent and intriguing design from Stewart- Warner. 



12 



Radio Today 



SELLING MORE TUBES 



— condition of tubes now in use reveals surprising situation 

— technical education of dealers and servicemen important now 

— record tube output in 1935 ; 39,000,000 in replacement biz 



* TUBES wear out with use. 

The majority of the listening pub- 
lic doesn't yet seem aware of this 
simple fact of life, if one can judge 
from the number of radio tubes sold 
at retail for replacement. 

For if the dealer will consider any 
group of radio sets in use in his com- 
munity, he will find an astounding 
situation with respect to the hours 
and years the tubes have been in use. 

Out of every four tubes, one was 
replaced last year; another tube has 
been in use two years; the third has 
been running three years, and the 
fourth tube is four years old or older. 

It is time therefore to put pressure 
on getting the old tubes out of the 
sockets, and new tubes in. 

Manufacturers help 

Sensitive promoters of the tube- 
replacement business have betaken 
themselves to the serious education, 
in one way or another, of dealers and 
servicemen. These days, a smart 
dealer will get plenty from the manu- 
facturers in the way of info; lists of 
sales ideas, formulae for feature pro- 
motions, the technical low-down, 
equipment data, display features, tip 
files, "deals," and assorted sales 
stimulators. 



Test equipment 

"Tune-ups," it turns out, are best 
adapted to promotion in smaller 
towns where types of service can 
readily be personally publicized. In 
many cases they have been success- 
fully staged before special broadcasts 
of universal interest. Trend is to- 
ward plugging these offers on the air, 
although newspaper and handbill ads 
are popular among dealers. 

"Deals" offered by the tube mak- 
ers formerly ran to casual shop equip- 
ment, such as coats, displays, and 
files, but at this point there are many 
which include the highest priced test- 
ing equipment. Signal generators, 
tube checkers, testers, trouble 
shooters, oscilloscopes, combinations, 
meters, analyzers, voltmeters, etc., 
come from the leading instrument 
makers and are offered through the 



tube promoters. Price of the instru- 
ments is often credited when tubes 
are ordered from the makers. 



More stunts 

Dressing up a handsome blonde as 
a "human radio tube" sold 5,000 
tubes in little over a week at Russell's 
Eadio Co., Indianapolis, Ind. The 
girl wore a costume featuring the 
colors on the containers of the tubes 
handled at the store, and she stayed 
at the place all day long to test old 
tubes brought in as a result of a 
special ad. Tube tester was put in 
the center of the floor, and a special 
window display helped to attract 
traffic. 

Up-to-the-mark technique in tube 
selling asks not only that dealers im- 
prove their technical education by an 
intelligent perusal of new reference 
manuals and data charts, but they 
should advertise the fact that they 
are up to the minute, for the benefit 
of the patrons. Neat and spectacular 
testing equipment is operated in 
prominent spots in the shop, sur- 
rounded by flashy tube displays. 

Servicemen are encouraged to 
know and sell allied electrical mer- 
chandise, along with sets and tubes, 
so that they may start with one and 
end up with the other. 



73,000,000 tubes in year 

First-of-year estimates indicate 
that 73,261,000 radio tubes were made 
and sold during the last twelve 
months. Probably 39,000,000 of these 
went into replacements through re- 
tailers and servicemen. Here are the 
figures by quarters for tube sales by 
tube licensees during last year and 
the year before, together with esti- 
mated total sales : 

1935 Tubes Value 

Jan.-Mar 15,247,456 $ 5,266,500 

Apr. -June 14,454,219 4,563,800 

Jul. -Sep 20,559,634 7,365,897 

Oct. -Dec. (est.).. 21,000,000 7,500,000 

Licensed (est.).. 71,261,000 $24,700,000 
Unlicensed (est.). 2,000,000 570,000 

All tubes 73,261,000 $25,270,000 

1934 

Jan.-Mar 13,664,063 $ 5,369,678 

Apr.-June 11,400,000 3,900,000 

Jul. -Sep 12,200,577 4,472,389 

Oct.-Dec 20,000,000 7,300.000 

Total licensed .. 57,264,640 $21,042,067 
Unlicensed (est.) 2,000,000 540,000 

Total. 1934 59,264,640 $21,582,067 



DRAMATIZING BROADCAST 
PROGRESS 

* Lively and convincing 
demonstration of what improvement 
has been made in the quality of 
broadcasting since 1922 was staged at 
WOR, Newark, N\ J., a recent broad- 
cast of the popular Alfred Wallen- 
stein's Sinfonietta program. 

By using line-filters to cut out the 
high and low-register notes, WOR 
engineers were able to show what the 
broadcast would have been like in 
1922, in 1925, and in 1929, using the 
various types of old-style mikes. 
When they turned on the 1936 ar- 
rangement, using the new non-direc- 
tional mike, the improvement in tone 
quality was obvious and amazing. 



Out of every four radio tubes 



And 
No. 4 
has been 
1 used 



.longer; 



January, 1936 



13 



RADIOS FOR FARMERS 

■ — farm groups tense with interest in 1936 political battle 

— uprush in income this year makes farmers likely buyers 

— home demonstrations will sell farm families quickly 



* THIS 1936 promises to be a ban- 
ner year for radio on the farm. For the 
American farmer loves nothing better 
than his politics. And whereas in 
former Presidential years he had to 
hitch up and drive to town to sit-in 
on mere small-town oratory, now his 
radio set gives (or can give) him a 
reserved seat to listen to the nation's 
topflight political debaters, includ- 
ing the Presidential candidates 
themselves. 

So 1936 is going to see a good many 
thousands of new radio receivers 
move promptly into farm territory ; 
thousands of new farm listeners will 
be added to the political audiences, 
and the farm voters will go to the 
polls in November as well informed 
as any city cousins. 

For as a purchaser of radio sets 
and other new merchandise, the 
farmer is now equipped with real 
money in his overalls pocket — cash 
dollars which have flowed in to him 
along with the rise in the prices of 
farm products. 

What the farmer has gone through, 
during the depression, and how far 
he has already come-back, on the way 
to a state of rural prosperity, is best 



pictured by the total figures on farm 
incomes for the United States. 

Prior to 1929, the farm income of 
this country ran between 13 and 16 
billion dollars a year. By 1932 how- 
ever, the farm total had dropped to 
only four billions, imposing on the 
farm population hardships even worse 
than those visited on industrial com- 
munities. 

But in 1933 1 farm income turned 
upward, and the total reached five 
and a half billions. In 1934, it had 
passed seven billions; in 1935 it was 
eight billions. 

And for 1936, the outlook is for 

9 to 10 billions of farm money in 
circulation, indicating that a healthy 
share of the 1929 totals have already 
been regained. 

Of the United States' total 130,- 
000,000 population, 35,000,000 live on 
farms; another 25,000,000 live in 
small rural communities and rightly 
can be classed with the farm group. 

There are 6,500,000 farms; hardly 

10 per cent of these farms are yet 
served with electricity, leaving a vast 
number of farm homes which are 
prospects for battery sets of one kind 



or another, if they are to enjoy any 
radio reception at all. 

It is not surprising then that the 
sale of battery sets for farm use 
reached during 1935 the all-time top 
total of 550,000. Special-battery sets 
for use with "air-cell' batteries, made 
up a part of this. Also during the 
year just closed, the wind-mill gen- 
erator was introduced, enabling the 
farm listener to employ an ordinary 
storage battery and to keep it charged 
by wind-power, without further at- 
tention or trips to the village for 
replenishment. 



4,000,000 farms without 
radio 

And yet today, as the Presidential 
campaign of 1936 opens with its first 
scattering shots, there are at least 
4.000,000 farm homes which are with- 
out radio sets, although well able to 
purchase them. 

For the farmer is a generous if 
thrifty buyer. Look around his tool 
yard or shed and see his $150 feed- 
grinder, his $300 binder, his $650- 
$1,000 tractor; his $700 team of 
horses; his $1,000 car. Then do not 
question his ability to buy and pay 
for a good radio set, if it is once 
brought out and set up in his home, 
so he can work the dials for himself. 

The radio set on the farm is far 
more than an entertainment device. 
It is a newspaper, a cultural channel, 
and an economic necessity to the farm 
producer who must depend upon dis- 
tant markets to sell his wares at best 
prices. 




Farm home features 

Also, farm interests have been the 
subject of some extra program-build- 
ing on the part of the broadcasters, 
so that broadcast schedules now in- 
clude special features that farmers 
will not want to miss. 

Rural listeners have learned to 
count on the National Farm and 
Home Hour for valuable tips on agri- 
cultural news, events, research and 
farm trends. Sponsored jointly by 
the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture and 
NBC, the popular broadcast is heard 
daily except Sunday through 60 sta- 
tion outlets. 

To sell radio sets to these 4,000,000 
farm homes is the radio industry's 
next big job. And it will have to be 
done by taking the sets to the farms, 
connecting them up, and letting the 
farm family discover for itself the 
miraculous country back of those 
magic dials. 



14 



Radio Today 



PUBLIC ADDRESS FOR 1936 

— local political campaigns create demand for P.A. rentals 

— large profit in furnishing amplifier systems 

— manufacturers supplying specialized equipment 



* STORMY opening of the presi- 
dential campaign and its allied by- 
play will furnish an additional income 
to wide-awake radio dealers and serv- 
icemen who are "public address - ' 
conscious. 

The possibilities of renting-out 
amplifier systems are practically un- 
limited; there will be hundreds of 
political meetings in every community 
between now and Election Day — 
each rally should have its public ad- 
dress system so that the speaker can 
be heard clearly in the far corners 
of the auditorium without raising 
his voice. 

Sound cars, too, are virtually a 
necessity if the candidates are to 
reach the general public — most of 
whom are too busy or lazy to attend 
scheduled pow-wows. By parking the 
car at a busy spot in the town and 
first playing a phonograph record, 
the politician can soon attract a large 
audience. He then can address the 
group, irrespective of size, via the 
amplifier with complete ease ; the 
power of his voice can be used for 
oratory rather than mere coverage of 
the crowd. 

Getting started 

Many servicemen have gone into 
public address work with an invest- 
ment on the order of $100 or less. 
The capital required depends entirely 
upon quality of reproduction desired 
— fortunately, for speech amplifica- 
tion it is not necessary to have high- 
fidelity microphones and amplifiers. 

For the dealer who wants to be 
equipped for mobile work and inside 
installations, a single system which 
will work on both 110 AC and 6 volts 
DC is most economical. Ordinarily 
such amplifiers have a power output 
of 15-20 watts, which is capable of 
covering almost any gathering, in- 
side or outdoors. Most PA men use 
their delivery car, usually a passenger 
model, for the mobile installation. 
By mounting one or two loudspeakers 
on the roof on swivels, the reproducers 
can be pointed in any desired direc- 
tion for optimum coverage. 

For use indoors the system is op- 
erated from the AC line. Most of 
the portable-mobile equipment is com- 
pact and not too heavy for one per- 
son to move, and it can be set up in 



a short time. It represents an ideal 
solution for the individual who wants 
to do both types of work with the 
least investment. 

A turntable and pick-up for record 
reproduction are necessary for the 
success of any PA set-up. The rec- 
ords are valuable in providing musi- 
cal interludes, attracting attention, 
and giving both the speaker and 
audience a relief. 

Mike attraction 

A word should be said about mic- 
rophones — if possible several differ- 
ent types should be on hand. In cer- 
tain installations one particular type 
may give better results. Spare mic- 
rophones are desirable, because mikes 
have a great attraction — and they 
are very likely to disappear if not 
watched very closely. For this rea- 
son expensive microphones, if used, 
should be carefully guarded. 

The PA man should use the mic- 
rophone attraction in his selling. 
Since the mike is the symbol of broad- 
casting, it is well to bring a shiny 
one along on all sales calls and let 
the prospect handle it — the results 
are strikingly effective. 



Making contacts is the most im- 
portant thing in selling PA services 
to political campaigns. Knowing a 
friend who has a friend in politics is 
one way. Advertising over the local 
broadcasting station is very effective 
— particularly in smaller communi- 
ties. And get acquainted with the 
engineer and operators of your local 
stations — they receive many re- 
quests concerning public address 
installations. 

Your own store is also an effective 
place to advertise your services. On 
service calls and sales of sets make 
mention of the fact that you can 
supply amplifiers — hand out your 
calling cards, on which there should 
be reference to public address and a 
picture of a microphone. When you 
rent your services — have a sign in 
the auditorium or on your sound car 
telling who you are and that you are 
supplying the PA system. You should 
always contact the owner of the hall 
and try to sell him on the idea of 
having a permanent installation — 
there is much profit in such sales. 

What to charge 

Prices for rental are always diffi- 
cult to determine. The policy of 
charging what the traffic will bear is 
about the only advice that can be 
given. This charge depends upon the 
competition, the state of finances of 
the organization, who you know, and 
your own reputation. Always get a 
deposit in advance — if possible get 
the full amount. Too many persons 
have found out that it is practically 
(To page 33) 




January, 1936 



15 



"MILLION -DOLLAR PROGRAMS 



• ORGANIZED rush, sustained 
and expensive, for renowned artists 
who will face the mike for the benefit 
of listeners in 1936, starts off a new 
year of thrilling air features. Star 
performances will crowd the air 
waves to such an extent that radio 
dealers have only to mention the de- 
tails, in order to convince his pros- 
pects that he is selling a singularly 
spectacular type of merchandise. 

Intense interest has already been 
stirred up in radio's part in the next 
presidential election. Colorful po- 
litical skirmishes are the order of the 
day, and many extraordinarily dra- 
matic broadcasts lie ahead. 



. . . as never before 

H. V. Kaltenborn, veteran news 
analyst at CBS has observed: ''The 
loud speaker has brought the politi- 
cal leaders and their ideas into every 
American home ... as a result this 
national campaign is sure to arouse 
the country as never before." 

Unprecedented position of radio at 
the recent opening of Congress re- 
sulting in specific publicity for the 
stands to be taken by both the na- 
tional chains, set the pace for lis- 
tener interest in coming political in- 
trigue. Never before have party 
leaders waited at the door of the 
studios with such eager requests for 
time. 

Political gentry have realized the 
terrific meaning of radio's power and 
the fact that they will influence 
greatly what goes on the air during 
the year does not mean that listeners 
will be bored with dull political fan- 
fare. It means that they will be able 
to tune in on the news that interests 
them more than anything else at the 
moment. 

More millions ready 

Trends in programs building for 
1936 are likely to accent big names, 
as regular features and as guest stars. 
Interesting adaptations of the ama- 
teur shows are expected, although the 
sponsors appear to shy from rank 
novelties. Tip-top comedians appear- 
ing with dance orchestras seem to be 
encouraging the popular yen for 
brisk farce and swing tunes of the 
instant. 

It appears too that new emphasis 
will fall on world-wide broadcasts, 
24 hour studio schedules, sport events, 



and radio versions of newspaper fea- 
tures, cartoons, and columns. 

Listeners will never be bored with 
misguided innovations cluttering the 
air waves in 1936, because the pat- 
tern is pretty well fixed and sponsors 
know what types of shows have 
brought national acceptance for prod- 
ucts already plugged in broadcasting. 

Who is to gather, who is to sponsor, 
and who is to broadcast news reports 
will perhaps be settled in 1936, but 
meanwhile listeners hear complete 
summaries anyway. Commentators 
have worked up huge followings and 
public interest in the news as inter- 
preted by the human voice is defi- 
nitely on the upgrade. 

These will sell sets 

Promising item on new' CBS bills 
for 1936 is "Musical Reveries" fea- 
turing the tenor, Stuart Churchill, 
four times a week. More artists on 
the Ford Hour at the same studios 
include Lucrezia Bori, Gregor Piati- 
gorsky, Enzio Pinza, Richard Bonelli, 
Efrem Zimbalist, and Nelson Eddy. 

Full glory of the Metropolitan 
Opera's joyous Saturday matinees 
are not to be missed on NBC; main 
season continues until Mar. 21. Pe- 
culiar punch of the Metropolitan's 
auditions for new singers is also 
available now to radio fans, since it 
has been dragged from behind Man- 
ager Johnson's locked doors and 
launched on WEAF, sponsored and 
all. 

There's a new Fred Waring set-up 
on NBC and a new Palmolive Beauty 
Box lay-out on CBS as dial spots of 
fresh value. Paul Whiteman, well 



THE BLACK LIST OF 

RADIO'S ENEMIES 

/. Publicity-seeking politicians 
who condemn broadcasting 
to get newspaper headlines 

2. Disgruntled reformers (get- 
ting nowhere Jast with pro- 
hibition) who want morejree 
tlmejor themselves 

3. Newspaper publishers who 
print distorted jacts 

4. Radio men who knock pro- 
grams 



paid and thinner, has his pretentious 
"Musical Varieties" well under way. 
Expert rhythmist Harry Reser and 
his Cliquot Club Eskimos are also 
back on the air. 

New at WOR is a "Short Story 
Seminar" with a deal of literary lions 
scheduled for it; the station has also 
launched a Viennese affair, titled 
"Alt Wien," which is very welcome 
indeed because of its Strauss music. 
WOR also goes in for some racy ad- 
venture on the high seas, with a new 
feature billed as "The Holisters." 

Fresh batch of "Melody Matinees" 
has had a brisk opening on WEAF. 
Bing Crosby has taken over the Kraft 
show, Thursday nights, and his sen- 
sational new comedian, Bob Burns, 
gets more encouragement. 

BOAKE CARTER STARTS 4TH YEAR 

* Valiant and bold- 
spoken Boake Carter, newscaster on 
the Columbia Broadcasting System 
under the sponsorship of Philco, has 
just begun his fourth year on the air. 
Airing five nights a week, at 15 min- 
utes a clip, the feature costs Philco, 
in round figures, $12,500 weekly, for 
time alone, and the bill for 1935 will 
be around $560,000. 

Mr. Carter believes in "discussion" 
and has not been reluctant to inspire 
it. His interpretation of the news is 
crisply independent; he's the sort 
that comes right out with views that 
are pointed and honest. He has 
waded into many a political mix-up 
and preferred to follow only the civi- 
lized impulse. And on his 23-station 
hook-up he has gathered a following 
which applauds heartily. 

NEW HIGH FOR AIR ADS 

* Powerful drag of 
broadcast advertising got further 
proof when the Sinclair Minstrels, an 
NBC show ethered on the Blue net 
of 46 stations, made an offer of a 
free Dinosaur Stamp Album to every 
child who would go to a Sinclair 
service station accompanied by an 
adult. 

Actually, within 48 hours after the 
offer was aired, over 1,000,000 chil- 
dren rushed out after an album. At 
least the Sinclair people found the 
supply exhausted after the first ex- 
citement, and the next week hiked 
the supply to 2,000,000. 



16 



Radio Today 



GO WITH EVERY SET WE SELL" 




Important on the dial — top (left) Haile Selassie, Ethiopian 

Emperor who is radio-conscious; center (left) Sigmund 

Romberg, composer of 68 romantic operettas. 



January, 1936 



Shown in the bottom row are Deane Janis (left), California 

caroler; Lucrezia Bori (center); and Nelson Eddy (right). 

Latter two artists are favorite guests. 



17 



PHONOGRAF COMBINATIONS 

— musical appreciation sharpened by studies now on the air 

— new glamour of opera stars has hit the public fancy 

— family circles are now curious about fine points 

— 1936 features of radio-phonographs make them practical 



• THIRTY-ONE MILLION 
homes in the United States would 
like to be credited, if you please, 
with some cultural ambitions ! 

Oddly enough, exactly 31 of the 
leading- radio manufacturers in the 
country are now making radio-phono- 
graph combinations. Prices range 
from $50 to $1,400 but the data is 
destined to change swiftly as new 
models are offered to meet the re- 
newed interest in this "instrument of 
distinction." 

Inspired by radio 

Not all prospects for combinations 
need to have high-brow tastes, but 
whatever musical instincts have slum- 
bered in us have been considerably 
stirred by samples of classics heard 
and explained in radio programs. 
Much of this interest had its origin 
in the 65,000 radio equipped schools 
of the country, and now there must 
be provision made for follow-ups at 
home. 

Walter Damrosch's Music Appre- 
ciation Hour on NBC is "required 
listening" for 10,000,000 school chil- 
dren; the program on CBS titled 
"Understanding Opera" goes over a 
network of 36 stations. Both of 
these, and others, have been found to 
bo of sure-fire interest to adults also. 




Upshot is that the trend these days 
is toward "the fine points of musical 
composition and performance" as the 
Radio Institute of Audible Arts puts 
it. Musical study and experimenta- 
tion in homes can best be carried on 
with the use of a good radio-phono- 
graph combination. 



Selling angles 



Tommy Dorsey, leading Victor sales 



Here is the chance for dealers to 
suggest that all of this fascinating 
home study and experimentation may 
be carried on at small additional cost 
by investing in an instrument which 
can play the musical favorites when 
needed. Appetites for model selec- 
tions have been sharpened, and it is 
up to the dealer to see that something 
is clone about it in the American 
home. 

Right now, the dealer will find that 
manufacturers are busy creating new 
departments, new franchises for com- 
ing merchandising campaigns in com- 
binations. Additional models are be- 
ing offered which will meet the 
demands in any dealer's locality, and 
doubtless it will mean a fine source 
of more profits for him. 

Demand for stars 

Recently, the stage of the Metro- 
politan Opera has been emptied by 
singers who found it profitable to 
journey to Hollywood. Lily Pons, 
Lawrence Tibbett, Gladys Swarthout, 
Nelson Eddy, Nino Martini, and 
Grace Moore are among those who 
have worked up popular following* 
which were denied to even the top- 
flight dramatic stars. 

Elaborate ballyhoo of these artists, 
which Hollywood has by no means 
neglected, has created a situation in 
which their names actually mean 
something to the patrons who come 
into a radio dealer's shop. Since 
their masterpieces have all been re- 
corded, it appears that a record-player 
should be easy to sell. 

Dealers may now tell their pros- 
pects that the controls and record- 
changing devices used on the new 
combinations are simple and prac- 



tical. New model being offered by 
General Electric is an example; rec- 
ord reproduction is handled through 
audio system, using 9 ten-inch or 8 
twelve-inch records, changed in 4J4 
seconds. This instrument does not 
use remote controls. 

Hostesses in fashionable homes 
often require musical programs which 
do not permit commercial announce- 
ments that are likely to accompany 
regular broadcasts. Private social 
gatherings held in the daytime must 
turn to the combination for a musi- 
cal menu which is exactly proper. 

Localized popularity of certain 
opera stars fits into the merchandis- 
ing of combinations; Norwegian com- 
munities are likely to welcome the 
chance to hear Kirsten 'Flagstad's 
songs when and as often as they feel 
the urge. 

Sample of doings in the field is 
RCA's recent announcement that 
Commercial Investment Trust Co., 
One Park Ave., New York City, will 
finance purchases of the Victor 
Library of Recorded Music, working 
with dealers under much the same 
terms as apply to radio-phonograph 
combinations. 

This is the first time that financing 
plans have been available to dealers 
on any phonograph record merchan- 
dise, and the step opens the way for 
renewed sales promotion. 

Best sellers as ive go to press 

BRUNSWICK 

Love Will Live On — Fox trot. Then I 
Shan't Love You Any More — Fox trot. 
Both bv Hal Kemp and his Orchestra 
—7578. 

Begin the Beeuine — Fox trot. Can't 
We Dream a Midsummer Night's Dream 

— Fox trot. Both by Leo Reisman and 
his Orchestra — 7575. 

I Got Plenty o' Nuttin' — Fox trot. It 
Ain't Neeessarily So — Fox trot. Both 
bv Leo Reisman and his Orchestra — 
7562. 

DECCA 

The Music Goes 'Round and Around — 

Fox trot. VC by Mike Reilly. Looking 
For Love — Fox trot. Reilly-Farley and 
the Onyx Club Boys — 578. 

No Other One — Fox trot. A Little Bit 
Independent (But Easy On the Eyes). 
Both with VC by Bob Crosby and both 
played by his Orchestra — 629. 

Red Sails in the Sunset — Fox trot. 
Madonna Mia — Fox trot. Vocal by 
Carmen Lombardo, with Guy Lombardo 
and his Orchestra — 585. 

VICTOR 

The Music Goes 'Round and Around — 

Fox trot. (If I Had) Rhythm In My 
Nursery Rhymes — Fox trot. Both by 
Tommy Dorsey and his Clam Bake 
Seven — 25201. 

It Ain't Necessarily So — Fox trot. I 
Got Plenty o' Nuttin' — Fox trot. (Both 
from "Porgy and Bess".) Both by Guy 
Lombardo and his Royal Canadian 
Orchestra — 25204. 

Quicker Than You Can Say Jack Roll- 
inson — Fox trot. W 7 hen A Great Love 
Comes Along — Fox trot. Both by Guy 
Lombardo and his Roval Canadian 
Orchestra — 25205. 



18 



Radio Today 



VICTOR RECORDS ROLLING 
UP NEW TRIUMPHS! 

Definitely, this is the time to push your record business 



Here's a significant fact: — 
during the first two weeks 
of January, Victor Record 
sales were bigger than the 
same period in December. 
That's most unusual. Record 
sales usually drop in Janu- 
ary. January 6th brought 
Victor Records more orders 
than any other single day in 
the past 8 years ! That was in 
spite of the fact that Decem- 
ber 30 and 31 were the big- 
gest two consecutive days 
during the previous 5 years! 
No matter how you look 



at them, those figures prove 
just one thing: Victor Rec- 
ords are going big. The sales 
curve is shooting up. It's 
been rising for nearly three 
years now. Dealers who saw 
the boom coming have been 
making plenty of money 
with Victor. There's still no 
sign of a slackening pace. 
This is the time to give your 
record department an extra 
boost for extra profits. If you 
haven't a record department, 
get one, in a hurry. We'll 
tell you how to get going. 



ALL VICTOR 
RECORD SALES 

£aAt47foy<tftA.ot 1935 



90%<hh*./933 
62% oiM^c/934- 



These figures show how sales of 
Victor Records continue to increase. 





Dollars go 
Round and Round 



Victor always has the hits. 
"The Music Goes Round and 
Round" by Tommy Dorsey 
and his Clam Bake Seven 
(Victor Record 25201) is 
breaking all sales figures, roll- 
ingup bigger profitsto dealers. 





The mighty little R-93 Record 
Player — see how it's selling. 
Every sale means a new record 
prospect. 



VICTOR RECORDS 



RCA MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC., Camden, N. J., an RCA Service 
January, 1936 19 



SALES IDEAS THAT WORKED 

Tested sales stunts that may give you a lively start this year 



Logs pull the biz 

* Hollywood radio dealer 
drags in the customers by distribut- 
ing annually to 6,000 prospects a 
complete radio log, which the recip- 
ients have learned to depend on. H. 
D. Hatfield & Son regard this as the 
best possible direct mail appeal to 
Hollywood residents, and many a new 
customer comes in to say that "I've 
been using your log as a guide for 
years — thought it was about time to 
drop in and get acquainted." 

Hatfield's also gets results from a 
manufacturer-printed short-wave log 
to which is attached a personal note 
in reproduced handwriting. 

Country campaign 

* Brothers and England, 
Wellington, Ohio, announcing a de- 
parture from previous emphasis on 
sound equipment and service, have 
carefully planned a new local cam- 
paign for this season. 

The line-up : "An extensive sales 
and service campaign in rural areas 
within a 25-mile radius, to cover 
radio and home electrical appliances. 
Only one radio line will be carried. 
Calls at every rural home served 
by commercial electrical lines are 
planned. We will depend upon ac- 
tual home contact almost exclusively." 

Brothers and England, backed by 
what wisdom they picked up in the 



business since 1931, go on to say: 
"The plan might not work in metro- 
politan areas, but we tried it in a 
small way last year in our territory 
and did not lose a single sale due to 
a trade-name. What sells them is 
performance, trade-in allowance, 
ability of the set to stand up, and 
the service we give them if and when 
they need it. Any dealer equipped 
by experience, and capable of render- 
ing real service when needed, can do 
likewise." 

Offers 3-month trial 

* Radio men at Broome 
Furniture Co., Santa Fe, New Mex- 
ico, do not regard three or four days 
as a good test of a receiver, and sug- 
gest to prospects that they keep the 
set for two or three months, and 
make a small deposit. Plan elim- 
inates those who merely want to use 
a machine free of charge, and the 
others usually keep the set. Broome's 
reports that "very few come back." 

Hikes traffic 500% 

* Allan Jones, an oper- 
atic favorite in St. Louis, made a 
personal appearance for dealers 
TJnion-May-Stern at their radio store 
in that city and jammed the sales 
rooms to capacity. Stunt was pulled 
amid great ballyhoo for the world pre- 
miere of the singer's latest movie; the 



••""■B13 




Jobbers True & Blanchard, Newport, Vt., cover territory with this conspicuous 
trailer, equipped for brisk demonstrations of battery or power line sets. 



dealer upped his store traffic 500 per 
cent and made ten more sales than 
any day of the past year. 

A full hour program, distribution 
of autographed photos, and vigorous 
newspaper ads were part of the event. 

Appeal via roto ads 

* Maloney Sport Shop, 
Bayonne, N. J., stirs fan interest in 
New Jersey with regular issue of 
Philco's lively roto circular, 10,000 
strong. Prospects in Maloney terri- 
tory seem intrigued by the tricky 
lay-out titled News — Views which 
presents timely shots of important 
persons and places in radio, and the 
Sport Shop enjoys quickened sales 
tempo. 

Sells in cycles 

* At the Rockefeller Cen- 
ter Radio Shop, the "only radio shop 
in Radio City," the practice of selling 
in "gift cycles" is in favor, particu- 
larly for holiday merchandising. Sales 
managers at the shop consistently dis- 
play a handsome representation of all 
sets which are adapted to use by all 
members of the family cycle, appro- 
priate receivers for housewives, hus- 
bands, sons and daughters of all ages. 

Floor displays at the swank shop 
are elegantly arranged from the 
"every-purpose" angle. Window ex- 
hibits feature placards with such cap- 
tions as "Remember the child in your 
home" and "Just the thing for the 
bedroom or den." 

Let who will be clever 

* Malvin H. Marshall, of 
the Anchorlite Appliance Co., Pitts- 
burgh, has this advice for younger 
salesmen : "Make a natural and pleas- 
ant approach — don't overdo yourself 
trying to attract your prospect's at- 
tention; get the prospect seated if 
possible and intelligently discuss your 
merchandise; ask for an order." 

Marshall theory is that salesmen 
should be human and sensible and yet 
quite positive in personal demeanor. 
He sees no point in putting on any 
sort of an act, and he has had excep- 
tional success with the simple tech- 
nique. 



20 



Radio Today 



Glass houses for dealer 

* Grunbaum Bros. Fur- 
niture Co., Seattle, Wash., pioneer 
radio dealers with a special sized radio 
department on the first floor, have 
completely revamped the receiver dis- 
play rooms to handle year-round ac- 
tivity. Layout includes 6 booths, each 
scientifically sound-proof and equipped 
with short-wave aerials. 

Five of the booths are used for 
the five major lines featured by the 
department, the sixth is used for a 
collection of table and midget models 
of mixed makes. Side walls of each 
booth are glass panels, so that sales 
references can be made without dis- 
turbing the patron. 

Grunbaum has successfully used 
the device of selling sets in a win- 
dow also, so that street traffic may 
observe the whole performance given 
by the Grunbaum salesman. 

Dealer "lends" new sets 

* "After getting the feel 
of a new set," insists J. A. Mayes, 
radio manager at the Allen & Jemison 
Hardware Co., Tuscaloosa, Ala., 
"many are unable to go back to the 
antiquated product." 

Mayes' service men, on their calls, 
are likely to leave a new set at the 
home of the patron while the old one 
is being repaired, unless minor ad- 
justments can be made at the time. 
A salesman then calls on the prospect 
and states the cost of repair and the 
allowance that can be made on the 
new set. With the new one already 
installed, Mayes reports that about 25 
per cent will say "all right." 

Dealer "traps" prospects 

* Under the word "Free," 
the Charles E. Wells Music Co., Den- 
ver, staged an elaborate radio show in 
an upstairs room, hostesses and all, 
and then fixed it so that the guests 
could not get back down to the street 
without passing through the store. 
Elevators went up, but never down. 

Event attracted 1,000 visitors daily 
for three days, and 90 per cent of 
them turned out to be prospects. 
Organ concerts were the only musical 
features. 

Beauty shops need sets 

* Resourceful dealers 
will discover that operators of beauty 
shops are likely prospects for good re- 
ceivers. Radio programs are the 
favorite entertainment for patrons 




Pleasant, new, sound-proof demonstration booths, a row of six, are the boon of 

floor salesmen at Grunbaum Bros., Seattle, Wash. Glass panels between them 

allow salesmen to make inter-booth sales references. 



who might be in for some dull mo- 
ments while the body is being 
groomed. Other forms of pastimes 
have been tried, but none is as satis- 
factory as a lively radio program, par- 
ticularly since the patron can listen 
without having to move about while 
the beauty operator is in action. 

Folloiv-up ivrinkle 

* At the Robinson Radio 
and Refrigeration Co., Houston, 
Texas, salesmen of refrigerators and 
gas ranges are instructed to follow up 
every major sale within 30 to 60 days 
to try for a radio sale. 

"This plan for re-contacting cus- 
tomers works very fine for us," say 
Robinson managers. "Eighty per cent 
of our radio sales are to people who 
have purchased some appliance from 
us before, or have bought a radio 
here. And, incidentally, our radio 
sales average better than $75 each." 

Valentine eye-catcher 

* Neat and effective 
radio window for Valentine time, 
built around a large red paper heart 
through which a radio set has been 
pushed, has been used successfully by 
several dealers. The pierced paper 
heart is displayed at the rear center, 
and the dealer may fill up the remain- 
ing space with other trimmings of his 
own choice. 

Electric Shop, Cincinnati, used the 
device supplemented by the use of a 
yellow spot-light, and larger models 
at the sides. Smaller appliances were 



exhibited amid a profusion of white 
tissue, heart and dart stickers, pleated 
pink drapes and black velvet. United 
Music Store, Toledo, got a good effect 
with an exceptionally large paper 
heart with the radio breaking through 
at the center. 

Miller's Electric Shop, Pasadena, 
used the idea along with a carnival 
effect — streamers hung from the 
ceiling — and three bridge lamps at 
rear sides and center. In all cases 
the theme of the display plays up 
appropriate sentiment and romance. 

Out-of-town service 

* Acme Radio and Re- 
frigeration Service, Topeka, Kansas, 
announced recently a special out- 
of-town service charge for nearby 
radio families around the Kansas cap- 
ital. The newest deal is "Out-of- 
town service at 10c per mile — no extra 
mileage charge for additional stops." 

"Ensemble" stunt 

■* Main floor booth at the 
May Company, Denver, Colo., dis- 
plays the necessary articles "To Make 
the Home More Livable" chosen from 
various departments of the store. 
Firm assumes that a prospect for liv- 
ing room accessories is also a prospect 
for at least a mantel radio, if the 
radio is shown as an important part 
of the properly appointed living room. 
Radio department at May's is on 
the second floor and many shoppers 
would miss it if the booth did not 
accent the receiver as a necessary item 
for the living room. 



January, 1936 



21 



STANDARDIZING SERVICING TECHNIQUE 

John Rider points out that systematic methods 
of servicing will produce greater profits 



By JOHN F. EIDER 
Service Editor, Radio Today 

* DESPITE the fight which 
rugged individualism has waged in 
connection with Federal affairs — we 
still feel that interest can well be 
aroused in the standardization of 
servicing technique. We write these 
lines with the full knowledge that it 
is a controversial subject and that 
there will be those people who will 
claim that they have their own and 
individual methods of testing, and 
that there can be no standardization 
of technique. Also there are those 
who feel that the merits of individ- 
uality are preferred to mass produc- 
tion systems. On the other hand, we 
feel that too much time is consumed 
in the servicing of a radio receiver. 
Speaking about time consumed, we 
greet the man who will immediately 
speak about the intermittent contact 
and the uncertainty of locating the 
sources of trouble within a specified 
time. We grant that this is true. 
However, intermittent types of trou- 
bles do not represent the greater ma- 
jority of defects in radio receivers. 
Without qualification, we say that all 



other types are subject to a routine 
form of test, rather than the hit or 
miss and trial and error methods, 
which are typical of rugged individ- 
ualism. 

We have no quarrel with hit or 
miss and trial and error methods 
where they constitute a part of a logi- 
cal test procedure, but where the op- 
eration is in reality a matter of 
groping in the dark — that certainly 
is not consistent with modern times. 

Scientific servicing 

What is a scientific method? — 
you may ask. Several can be ad- 
vanced and each may find its pro- 
ponents. At this time we are not so 
much concerned with the selection of 
any one system, as we are with the 
inculcation of the idea to proceed 
through the receiver in a logical 
manner — wherein the normal process 
of advancement is well-established in 
the mind of the operator. It is quite 
natural that some sort of breakdown 
or division of the sections in a radio 
receiver or amplifier be advanced as 
being a logical sequence. The exact 
nature of this breakdown may be dif- 




In the home the set analyzer often provides an effective means of determining 

the general source of trouble. Business-like equipment will foster the idea among 

radio owners that the serviceman really knows his radios. 



ferent in a case of a receiver which 
is "dead" and a receiver which is op- 
erative but not producing the required 
results. Whether the actual tests in 
each of the divisions in the receiver 
is a voltage test or a resistance test 
is a matter of choice — although we 
favor the resistance method of analy- 
sis. As we stated, the important 
thing is a logical pre-established 
approach. 

Hopping from one part of the re- 
ceiver to the other — guessing as to 
the operation of any one component 
network in the receiver — wondering 
about this and that — does not belong 
in modern servicing routine. 

Not stereotyped 

It is barely possible that by this 
time you may have cultivated the im- 
pression that we advocate a stereo- 
typed "hand-book" method of attack 
in servicing problems. This, too, is 
far from the truth. There are suffi- 
cient versions of servicing problems 
to preclude the actual servicing from 
ever becoming a dull, colorless affair. 
There are enough variations present 
in the arrangement of the receivers, 
which come into the modern service 
shop, to arouse interest in each and 
every instance and to make each re- 
ceiver a separate problem and one 
which taxes the ability of the oper- 
ator. Nevertheless, there is still 
something universal in all of these 
receiver problems, and that is the 
use of a common method of attack. 
Perhaps this may mean the acquisi- 
tion of new equipment — or addi- 
tional equipment and the abolition 
of improvised testing systems. If 
such is the case, it must be done and 
there is no alternative. 

Eliminate guesswork 

There is no denying the fact that 
receivers have become quite compli- 
cated and that if the problems pre- 
sented by modern design are to be 
solved, guesswork must be eliminated. 
What with the interlocked circuits, 
no method other than a routine pro- 
cedure will enable the discovery of 
the defect in the shortest possible 
time. Such mode of operation is re- 
quired for the protection of the cus- 
tomer and for the self-preservation 



22 



Radio Today 




NEW! 



TWO METAL-TUBE FERRODYNES THAT ARE 

PRICED TOO LOW! 

Latest Stewart -Warner creations offer beauty and performance 
far beyond their cost. Read the opportunity they offer you 



EVERY tradition of radio value in 
the lower price bracket is swept 
aside by this announcement ! 

Just think of a real, full-size Craft- 
Built console, beautifully and strongly 
built in overlaid curly maple, pencil- 
striped walnut and matched stump 
walnut, and hand -rubbed to a fine 
satin finish — a genuine Ferrodyne 
chassis with seven tuned circuits engi- 



neered throughout especially for the 
NEW METAL TUBES -a full 8-inch 
speaker of the most improved design 
— all drawing buyers into your store 
with this amazing price ! 

And a twin in table size, equally 
well housed, identical in performance 
and just as surprisingly priced ! 

Here's just the tonic radio sales need 
for the late winter season when value 



is the key to profit. Both have 5 metal 
tubes. Both have illuminated dial, 
tone control, built-in line filter and 
other quality features, and cover both 
police bands. Both offer you — and 
your prospects — more than radio has 
ever offered before. If your distribu- 
tor hasn't contacted you, phone or wire 
him now. STEWART-WARNER 
CORPORATION, Chicago, Illinois. 



STEWART-WARNER 

Zfct/UOthfite. RADIO 



January, 1936 



23 



and profitable operation of the serv- 
ice station. The common good of 
the industry demands that the cus- 
tomer be protected against penalties 
in the form of excessive charges, im- 
posed because of non-systematic pro- 
cedure in the service shop and the 
resultant unnecessary loss of time. 
The financial 'welfare of the servicing 
industry also demands systematic 
procedure in order that the prices 
which are charged be in line with 
common sense and reason — yet be 
profitable. 

PROFIT ON PARTS 

* HOW do you sell your parts? 
We know that you huy at a discount 
— a 40 per cent discount off list. 
Do you charge for your parts at list 
and figure that you are earning 40 
per cent on the sales price? Do you 
figure this 40 per cent on list as be- 
ing a part of your profit and allow 
it to influence your charge for the 
time and labor involved in the service 
shop? 

Tou may be interested in the fol- 
lowing facts : While it is true that 
the discount you receive is 40 per 
cent off list, it has been found that 
between 10 per cent and 20 per cent 
of this 40 per cent is absorbed in 
various expenses relating to the han- 
dling of these parts, with 15 per cent 
representing a very fair and common- 
place average. It is, therefore, evi- 
dent that at best the usual net profit 
is seldom more than 25 per cent on 
the sale price — that is, if you are 
selling or charging for these parts 
at list. Oftentimes the sale of the 
part at list represents a loss, and for 
that matter — if the list price of the 
part were twice as great, it would 
still represent a loss. We are refer- 
ring to low-priced replacement items; 
as, for example, small resistors and 
condensers, units, which, while of 
high quality, list at prices ranging 
from 15$ to perhaps 354 or 40^. 

High handling expenses 

The discount on a 20^ resistor is 
84. As a general rule, the handling 
expenses relating to such a unit, that 
is, in connection with its purchase 
and sale, invariably cost more than 
the aforementioned 84. In view of 
the fact that the greatest number of 
replacement parts, which are handled 
by a service organization during a 
year, are the low-priced items, it is 
essential that service men earn their 
full profit on sales as represented by 
the discount off list. Expressed in 
another manner, it is the wisest 



move to charge for replacement parts 
at list. 

Of course, there are exceptions to 
this statement, as for example, the 
case of a unit which sells for $6.00, 
$8.00 or $10.00, and where a charge 
to the customer at list price would 
make the entire service charge so 
high as to result in the loss of the job. 
In such instances, it is quite proper 
to sacrifice some portion of the profit 
upon the parts, providing that there 
is no loss entailed in the handling 
of the part and that the proper 
amount of profit is made upon the 
sale of the service, time, or labor. 



MAILING PIECES 



* MAYBE we're too curious, but 
upon numerous occasions we have 
spoken to friends of ours who receive 
literature from service organizations. 
In each and every case, the same com- 
ment was heard — namely that there 
was no reader appeal in the literature 
which was received from the service 
organization. We, of course, realize 
that the amount of money available 
for such material is not as great as 
is available to other organizations 
which attempt direct mail sales. At 
the same time, we also realize that a 
post card can be made attractive. If 
those organizations, which supply 
mailing pieces of one kind or an- 
other for use by servicemen, would 
give some thought to the contents 
and appearance of such material, the 
interest of the recipient — that is, 



the set owner — would be aroused to 
a greater extent. 

Educational data 

Take, as one concrete example of 
what text could be printed upon a 
post card — the subject of receiver 
tuning. We doubt very seriously if 
20 per cent of all the radio receiver 
owners, operating receivers equipped 
with tuning indicators, appreciate the 
indication upon the tuning meter as 
it relates to the tone quality of the 
reproduced signal. This fact was 
brought to our attention during sev- 
eral conversations. . . . The men and 
women of the household did not 
read the instruction booklets. A 
catchy head and a short description 
contained upon such a mailing piece 
would attract the attention of these 
people. At least such is our reaction, 
based upon questions asked. 

Of course, we know that all of the 
people who would receive such a 
mailing piece from a local organiza- 
tion, would not be in possession of 
receivers equipped with tuning meters, 
so that some of the material will be 
wasted. Such waste, however, would 
not be in excess of the normal loss 
with the present type of mailing piece. 
A subsequent mailing could cover 
some other phase of tuning, which 
would, perhaps, be more generally 
applicable. 

At any rate, we feel that some 
change is necessary in order that the 
direct mail efforts of the servicing 
industry be more lucrative. 




Many servicemen prefer to do their repairs at the shop after having made a rough 

estimate for the job. In the shop it is usually easier to repair the trouble, and 

the customer feels that he is getting more for his money. 



24 



Radio Today 




AS A RESULT of its amazing success, the RCA 
x\. Radio Tube Check-Up Promotion is being 
continued on an even larger scale in 1936. This 
great plan, tried and proven in 1935, has brought 
undreamed-of results in the form of new business 
to dealers in every part of the country. It has 
sold not only tubes, but repair jobs, new re- 
ceivers, and other appliances. 

The secret of its success is that it helps every- 
body. We sell tubes; you sell tubes and more; 
the customer gets new enjoyment out of radio. 

In 1936 the Check-Up campaign to improve 
radio reception (statistics show there are 5,850,000 
sets in need of repair) will be waged in all direc- 



tions: (1) Weekly in over 100 newspapers; (2) 
Three to six spot announcements a week on a 
nation-wide network of more than 30 broadcast 
stations; (3) National advertising in the Saturday 
Evening Post, Collier's and other leading peri- 
odicals; (4) Special new and result -producing 
direct mail pieces. Consult your jobber as to how 
you can tie in with the 1936 Check-Up for 
greater profits. Then, what dealers say about 
the Check-Up will be only what you know from 
your own experience. 

FOR PROFIT-MAKING IDEAS, 
ATTEND RCA SERVICE MEETINGS 



RCA RADIO TUBES 

RCA Radiotron Division, RCA MANUFACTURING CO., INC., Camden, N. J., A Radio Corporation of America Subsidiary 



January, 1936 



25 



CUSTOM-MADE CABINETS 

— strong interest in modern design justifies special plugging 

— console prospects can be headed toward newly styled jobs 

— ' ' freaks ' ' have been given dignity of legitimate novelties 

— cabinet lines complete enough this year to attract interest 



• QUEEN ANNE is slipping. 

Praise as you will the graceful 
tapers of period de